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Article
Publication date: 27 December 2022

Ana Junça Silva

Human–animal interactions (HAIs) have been found to have an extensive and significant influence on individuals' well-being and health-related outcomes. However, there are few…

Abstract

Purpose

Human–animal interactions (HAIs) have been found to have an extensive and significant influence on individuals' well-being and health-related outcomes. However, there are few studies that examine this influence on work-related contexts, such as teleworking. In this study, the author relied on the affective events theory to examine the effect of daily HAI on employees’ daily work engagement and the underlying mechanisms (daily affect ratio and state mindfulness), by resorting to a daily diary study.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses, the author collected daily data during five consecutive working days with pet owners (N = 400 × 5 = 2,000).

Findings

Multilevel results showed that interacting with pets during the working day was positively associated with daily work engagement, but this positive relationship was stronger for individuals with lower levels of mindfulness. Further analyses showed that the daily affect ratio mediated the moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between daily interactions with pets and daily work engagement.

Practical implications

These findings provide strong support for the proposed mediated moderation model; indeed, positive affect and mindfulness help to explain the positive effect of HAIs on work engagement. Hence, managers may consider the adoption of teleworking, even in a hybrid format for those workers who own pets, because interacting with pets may be a strategy to make them feel more positive and, in turn, more enthusiastic, dedicated and absorbed in their work.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies to demonstrate the importance of adopting pet-friendly practices, such as allowing pet owners to telework, as a way to promote daily work engagement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 53 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2023

Ana Junça Silva, António Caetano and Rita Rueff

Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, the authors expected that daily micro-events, daily hassles and uplifts at work influenced well-being via work engagement at the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, the authors expected that daily micro-events, daily hassles and uplifts at work influenced well-being via work engagement at the daily level.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two diary studies. In study 1, 181 workers answered a daily questionnaire for four working days (N = 181 × 4 = 724). In study 2, 51 workers filled in a questionnaire for ten consecutive working days (N = 51 × 10 = 510).

Findings

In study 1, the results demonstrated that work engagement fully mediated the effects of daily uplifts on well-being and partially mediated the effects of daily hassles on well-being. The results of study 2 revealed a full mediation for both kinds of daily micro-events. Hence, daily uplifts stimulated work engagement, which, in turn, enhanced well-being, and daily hassles minimized work engagement and, consequently, well-being.

Originality/value

The relationships explored provide new theoretical elements for models that explain well-being.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Ana Junça Silva, Patrícia Neves and António Caetano

This study draws on the affective events theory (AET) to understand how telework may influence workers' well-being. Hence this study aimed to (1) analyze the indirect relationship…

3011

Abstract

Purpose

This study draws on the affective events theory (AET) to understand how telework may influence workers' well-being. Hence this study aimed to (1) analyze the indirect relationship between telework and well-being via daily micro-events (DME), and (2) test whether procrastination would moderate this indirect effect.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the goals, data were gathered from a sample of teleworkers in the IT sector (N = 232). To analyze the data, a moderated mediation analysis was performed in SPSS with PROCESS macro.

Findings

The results showed that micro-daily events mediated the positive relationship between telework and well-being; however, this relation was conditional upon the levels of workers' levels of procrastination, that is, this link became weaker for those who were procrastinators.

Practical implications

By highlighting the importance of telework, DME and procrastination, this study offers managers distinct strategies for enhancing their employees' well-being.

Originality/value

Despite the existing research investigating the effect of telework on well-being, studies investigating the intervening mechanisms between these two constructs are scarce. Moreover, there is a lack of research investigating the moderating effect of procrastination in these relations. Hence, this study fills these gaps and advances knowledge on the process that explains how (via DME) and when (when procrastination is low) teleworking influences workers' well-being.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2023

Ana Junça Silva, Carolina Violante and Sílvio Brito

Recently new forms of telework emerged, such as the hybrid model; however, little is known about how and when it promotes performance. Based on the job demands-resources (JD-R…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently new forms of telework emerged, such as the hybrid model; however, little is known about how and when it promotes performance. Based on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, the authors developed a conceptual framework to demonstrate that the hybrid model of telework positively influences performance via positive affect. Furthermore, the authors identified both personal (emotional intelligence [EI]) and job resources (autonomy) as moderators of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed model, the authors collected data from teleworkers who were in a hybrid telework regime from the telecommunications industry (N = 290).

Findings

The results showed that (1) telework positively influenced positive affect and, in turn, performance and (2) the indirect effect of telework on performance through positive affect was moderated by both EI and autonomy.

Originality/value

These results appear to be fundamental for a better conceptual and practical understanding of how and when hybrid telework can improve performance.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 December 2023

Ana Junça Silva, Leticia Mosteo and Rita Rueff

Relying on the effort-recovery model, this study aimed to test how and when a good night’s sleep increases in daily physical health. The authors hypothesized that when individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Relying on the effort-recovery model, this study aimed to test how and when a good night’s sleep increases in daily physical health. The authors hypothesized that when individuals have a good night’s sleep, it helps them to recover their self-regulatory resources, and, in turn, these cognitive resources improve their physical health experienced at work. Furthermore, the authors argue that this will be different depending on the individuals’ levels of neuroticism; that is, the indirect relationship between sleep duration and physical health through self-regulatory resources will be stronger for individuals who score lower on neuroticism, and in contrast, the relationship will be buffered for those who score higher on neuroticism.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypothesized model, the authors conducted a three-wave longitudinal study with working adults (N = 262). The authors used multilevel modelling to test if neuroticism moderated the indirect relationship between sleep duration and physical health through self-regulatory resources, at both between and within-person levels.

Findings

The multilevel results showed that a good night’s sleep recovered self-regulatory resources needed to promote physical health; however, this indirect relationship was buffered for those who scored higher on neuroticism (versus lower levels of neuroticism).

Practical implications

Hence, the role of neuroticism as a potentially harming condition for employees’ physical health is pointed out.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the relevance of sleep as a recovery activity for both cognitive and physical resources experienced during the working day. However, this appears to be attenuated for employees with higher levels of neuroticism.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2023

Ana Junça Silva and Sara Martins

Although (tele)work is increasingly being adopted and employees’ behavior is recognized to be key for organizational outcomes (e.g. performance), the current literature on…

Abstract

Purpose

Although (tele)work is increasingly being adopted and employees’ behavior is recognized to be key for organizational outcomes (e.g. performance), the current literature on counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) in telework settings is fragmented, and a valid measurement instrument is lacking. This study aims to address this gap and starts by presenting a review of the current literature on counterproductive work behavior in flexible work arrangements (i.e. telework). Based on this study, eight categories of work behavior that appear to be frequent under telework settings were identified.

Design/Methodology

Next, four studies aimed at developing and validating a measurement instrument that captures employee counterproductive work behavior when teleworking: the counterproductive [tele]work behavior scale (CTwBS).

Findings

In Study 1, the CTwBS was created, and in Study 2, its factorial validity was examined (N = 350). In Study 3, using a sample of teleworkers (N = 289), the convergent and discriminant validity of the CTwBS was tested using self-ratings of (positive and negative) affect, attitudes toward telework and frequency of CWB in general. In Study 4, a daily-diary study across five workdays (N = 232 × 5 = 1,160) examined the criterion validity of the CTwBS.

Practical implications

The results indicated that the CTwBS is a valid and reliable instrument for capturing employee counterproductive work behavior in telework settings. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Originality

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, CTwBS is the first measure aimed at assessing counterproductive work behavior in telework settings.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2024

Ana Junça Silva

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mindfulness and two types of well-being, namely subjective and psychological well-being, particularly in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mindfulness and two types of well-being, namely subjective and psychological well-being, particularly in a managerial context. The mindfulness-to-meaning theory (MMT) suggests that the practice of mindfulness might lead individuals to reevaluate and find greater meaning in their experiences, ultimately contributing to increased well-being. Accordingly, we argue that mindfulness boosts well-being because it may potentially lead managers to reappraise what surrounds them, making them experience more frequent positive affect.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-wave survey with a two-week interval was used to gather quantitative data. An overall sample of 1,260 managers with and without experience with mindfulness took part in the study.

Findings

Structural equation modeling showed that mindfulness had a direct and positive relationship with both subjective and psychological well-being. Furthermore, both processes – positive reappraisal and positive affect – mediated the path from mindfulness to both forms of well-being.

Practical implications

The findings emphasize the importance of creating training strategies that develop managers’ ability to positively reappraise daily events and occurrences, which may trigger more frequently positive affective experiences. Therefore, promoting mindfulness training at the workplace may develop mindful employees, especially by working on specific strategies, such as positive reappraisal, which may be a promising empirical-based strategy to enhance well-being.

Originality/value

This study adds knowledge about how mindfulness can contribute to well-being and contributes to expanding the mindfulness-to-meaning theory by adding positive affective experiences as an additional mechanism in the relationship between mindfulness and well-being. Specifically, it demonstrates that the practice of mindfulness helps managers to positively reappraise their surroundings, which results in more frequent experiences of positive affect.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2024

Ana Junça Silva and Rosa Rodrigues

This study relied on the job demands and resource model to understand employees’ turnover intentions. Recent studies have consistently lent support for the significant association…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study relied on the job demands and resource model to understand employees’ turnover intentions. Recent studies have consistently lent support for the significant association between role ambiguity and turnover intentions; however, only a handful of studies focused on examining the potential mediators in this association. The authors argued that role ambiguity positively influences turnover intentions through affective mechanisms: job involvement and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the model, a large sample of working adults participated (N = 505).

Findings

Structural equation modeling results showed that role ambiguity, job involvement and job satisfaction were significantly associated with turnover intentions. Moreover, a serial mediation was found among the variables: employees with low levels of role ambiguity tended to report higher job involvement, which further increased their satisfaction with the job and subsequently decreased their turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design is a limitation.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions regarding how organizations can reduce employee turnover are discussed.

Originality/value

The findings provide support for theory-driven interventions to address developing the intention to stay at work among working adults.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2023

Ana Junça-Silva, Henrique Duarte and Susana C. Santos

Discovering opportunities is a key entrepreneurship competence for those who want to start their own business and who choose to enter the workforce. In this study, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

Discovering opportunities is a key entrepreneurship competence for those who want to start their own business and who choose to enter the workforce. In this study, the authors focus on the antecedents of the ability to discover entrepreneurial opportunities by uncovering how and when students' personal initiative (Frese and Fay, 2001) leads to an increase in this key competency. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of risk-taking and creativity in the interplay between personal initiative and opportunity discovery competencies among university students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with a self-assessment tool in two moments in time, using a sample of 103 university students from Portugal enrolled in an entrepreneurship course. The authors measured personal initiative and entrepreneurial risk-taking at the beginning of the entrepreneurship course (Time 1). Two months later (Time 2), by the end of an entrepreneurship course, the authors measured creativity and opportunity discovery abilities.

Findings

The results of this study showed that risk-taking mediates the effect of personal initiative on opportunity discovery and that creativity interacts with risk-taking and opportunity discovery. Specifically, the authors found that the relationship between entrepreneurial risk-taking and opportunity discovery is positive and statistically significant when students display average or above-average creativity. The indirect effect of the personal initiative on opportunity discovery through entrepreneurial risk-taking seems to increase when the student's creativity increases, as the index of moderated mediation is positive.

Research limitations/implications

As with all studies, there are limitations to work of this study. First, data of this study is restricted to a sample of students from Portugal. As such, the authors should be careful about generalizations concerning students from other cultural settings; entrepreneurship competencies can differ across countries. Second, the findings of the present study are based on students’ self-reports regarding their own entrepreneurship competencies.

Originality/value

This work can inspire entrepreneurship educators to look at the entrepreneurship competencies models holistically and inspire future work to explore the relationship patterns between entrepreneurial competencies.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2023

Ana Junça Silva and Raquel Dias

Although overall well-being is a well-studied phenomenon, financial well-being only recently has attracted scholars’ attention. Accordingly, this study aimed to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although overall well-being is a well-studied phenomenon, financial well-being only recently has attracted scholars’ attention. Accordingly, this study aimed to understand the relationship between financial well-being, its predictors (financial status, financial behaviour, financial knowledge and financial attitudes) and overall well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 262 working adults.

Findings

The results showed that only financial status was positively related to financial well-being and the latter was positively related to overall well-being. It was also found that financial well-being mediated the relationship between financial status and overall well-being. In sum, these results showed a multidisciplinary concept of overall well-being and that individuals tend to prioritize financial security over the other components.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the data is a limitation.

Practical implications

Practically speaking, this research is relevant because it highlights the evidence of financial status as an important influence on financial well-being, as well as the role of household income in individuals’ financial satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study addresses a call for research on the relationship between financial well-being, its main predictors and how these contribute to explain overall well-being.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 26