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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Marcela Sotomayor-Peterson and Ana A. Lucero-Liu

The purpose of this paper is to assess the associations between familism, frequency of physical contact, and marital satisfaction with mental health and well-being in a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the associations between familism, frequency of physical contact, and marital satisfaction with mental health and well-being in a sample of 58 female marital partners of migrants who stayed in Mexico when their spouses migrated to the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 58 women were recruited through word of mouth in Sonora, Mexico. All women had their partner (the father of her children) living in the USA. Survey was administered face-to-face in participants’ homes.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analysis found that higher marital satisfaction and frequency of physical contact predicts mental health and well-being. However, familism was not associated with mental health and well-being for female partners of migrants.

Originality/value

This work is unique in that the current sample of female partners of migrants originate from the Sonora border region and has greater physical contact with their partner than most studies on transnational families assume. Approximately 40 percent of participants residing in the Sonora border state meet with their partners at least once a month. Additionally, this work provides an intimate face to the understanding of the very specific processes distinctive of inhabitants of border regions that are part of international migration. In order to promote health equity, health providers (e.g. counselors) need evidence-based information to tailor services to the specific needs of underserved Mexican transnationals.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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