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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Amy Ragan, Jenna Kammer, Charlene Atkins and Rene Burress

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of library instruction on the use of e-textbook features in a seventh-grade science class in Budapest, Hungary. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of library instruction on the use of e-textbook features in a seventh-grade science class in Budapest, Hungary. Using the theory of value-expectancy, library instruction was designed to show students how the e-textbook features would improve their study habits.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a time-series, within-subject design, the researchers examined the students’ use of e-textbooks before receiving library instruction, and then again after receiving library instruction. Data were collected from student survey responses, focus group interviews, and digital library usage. A repeated-measures t-test was used to compare data collected prior to and following the instructional sessions.

Findings

The results indicate that the use of e-textbook features (glossary, audio, quizzes, notes, highlighter, and video) increased after library instruction. While the use of e-textbook features increased, this did not translate to other types of e-books: the use of the digital library did not increase.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has implications for research on the use of e-textbooks in academic settings. Baseline findings support the existing literature that shows that students do not use all of the features of an e-textbook. The research in this study adds that direct instruction on those features will increase use.

Practical implications

Librarians and teachers may want to consider direct instruction on e-textbooks. While it may not increase digital library usage, it may benefit the student learning experience.

Originality/value

This study builds on the work related to the student experience of using e-textbook. It highlights the value of library instruction in improving the student experience and use of e-textbooks.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Ami R. Moore, Foster Amey and Yawo Bessa

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of race, gender, and region of birth by assessing the earnings of blacks and whites from Africa, blacks from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of race, gender, and region of birth by assessing the earnings of blacks and whites from Africa, blacks from the Americas, whites from Europe and Asians from Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing, different income levels were used to see if there were any variations in earnings. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds of earnings at the various percentiles of the income of white African men, controlling for the human capital resources and other demographic variables.

Findings

The paper finds an unambiguous race effect among male workers. White males from both Africa and Europe have significant advantage over non‐white male workers from Africa, the Americas, and Asia. However, the earnings attainment is more favorable to white African males regardless of income levels. Further, a gender effect is also found in that relative to the earnings of white African‐born males, all the female workers in our study had lower odds at all the earning percentiles regardless of race and region of origin.

Originality/value

This paper helps clarify the issue of gender and stratification as it relates to immigrants in the USA.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Han Soo Kim, Minsoo Kang and Minjung Kim

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the category function of the sport fandom questionnaire (SFQ), determine the optimal categorization of the SFQ and calibrate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the category function of the sport fandom questionnaire (SFQ), determine the optimal categorization of the SFQ and calibrate the measurement qualities of the newly modified rating scale option using Rasch analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on the Rasch analysis to validate the SFQ. A series of studies are performed based on analysis procedures for the responses from 244 (study 1) and 477 (study 2) participants.

Findings

The results revealed that the original SFQ consisting of the eight-category rating scale is flagged due to irregular observation distribution and disordering of thresholds, whereas both six-category and seven-category rating scales meet the guidelines for the optimal categorization. However, only the seven-category rating scale showed desirable model-data fit indices. Furthermore, the results of the Rasch calibration model showed that all items of the SFQ have large variability, and a person's ability level varied moderately along the continuum.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, examining the psychometric properties of the SFQ, the current study provides information about the optimal categorization and presents a novel reconstruction category in measuring individuals' sport fandom level. In measuring the level of sport fandom, the authors suggest the use of a seven-category rating scale that the current study found to exhibit reliability and construct validity.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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