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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Amy Muller and Liisa Välikangas

The corporate boundaries that matter today are the boundaries that define and contain the corporation’s innovation searches. This article examines how innovation can be…

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Abstract

The corporate boundaries that matter today are the boundaries that define and contain the corporation’s innovation searches. This article examines how innovation can be extended outside the traditional corporate boundary. After identifying several factors that are driving extended innovation ‐‐ and, in so doing, changing the value‐creating nature of the firm ‐‐ the authors present extended innovation strategies for companies in either mature industries (where the industry structure is established( or emerging opportunity spaces (where the competitive structure and industry dynamics have yet to crystallize). In mature industries such as retail, new ideas are most likely to be found in the “white spaces” between companies. Companies should pursue these opportunities through cross‐company alliances that recombine assets and competencies. In emerging spaces such as biotechnology, where the locations of opportunities are unknown, companies should pursue explorative collaborations that emphasize low‐cost probing and learning.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Jorge Rufat‐Latre, Amy Muller and Dave Jones

For all the rhetoric – and hype – about open innovation, the reality is that few corporations have institutionalized open innovation practices in ways that have enabled

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Abstract

Purpose

For all the rhetoric – and hype – about open innovation, the reality is that few corporations have institutionalized open innovation practices in ways that have enabled substantial growth or industry leadership. This paper aims to explain how open innovation can achieve its potential in most companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Three cases of companies that practice various types of open innovation are discussed. The principles of establishing an organizational environment for open innovation are outlined.

Findings

The ability to move into and out of different industries by capitalizing on ideas and concepts from inside and outside the organization – open innovation – has tremendous value.

Practical implications

Without the appropriate mindset and, ultimately, operational structure in place, the promise of open innovation cannot be realized.

Originality/value

For corporate leaders, the paper identifies a key first step – to deliver on the promise of open innovation an organization must start by making the change from a competition‐focused, market‐share mindset to a competence‐based mindset.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Amy Muller, Nate Hutchins and Miguel Cardoso Pinto

While the open innovation concept proposed by Henry Chesbrough a decade ago has had some striking successes, the myriad options for engaging external partners can be

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Abstract

Purpose

While the open innovation concept proposed by Henry Chesbrough a decade ago has had some striking successes, the myriad options for engaging external partners can be daunting, so leaders need a guide for getting started that matches the needs of their firm. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies that innovation processes involve three stages during which the business model elements are conceived and elaborated: idea‐generation, idea‐development, and commercialization. The question for leaders is: “In which of the three stages could your growth efforts benefit from an infusion of external ideas and expertise?”

Findings

The open‐innovation approach does not require a company to replace all its current research and development (R&D) efforts. But it does change the primary question leaders should be asking to “How can my company create significantly more value by leveraging external partners to bring many more innovations to market?”

Practical implications

The article shows executives how they can systematically assess an innovation process, understand where new venture business models are weakest, and select the points at which open innovation could add some needed spark.

Originality/value

The article leads executives through two‐step process for introducing a customized open innovation program: step one, assess where your company's innovation process would benefit from external input by using five key questions; and step two, learn how to manage external relationships.

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Nate Hutchins and Amy Muller

The authors of this paper contend that too many firms' innovation initiatives are shackled with archaic budgeting and planning methodologies that are intended to protect

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors of this paper contend that too many firms' innovation initiatives are shackled with archaic budgeting and planning methodologies that are intended to protect managers from the embarrassment of blown budgets, missed deadlines, or market flops but instead suppress learning and adaptability, both critical to achieving successful commercialization of unique ideas. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose that the first step to rid myopia and rigidity from the stage‐gate approach is to re‐conceive it as an assumption‐driven process centered on learning, rather than simply a sequence of activities marching towards a pre‐determined outcome.

Findings

The authors suggest that firms should adopt assumption‐driven learning in a series of sequential divergent‐convergent cycles – one cycle per stage – each centered on testing the major assumptions for that stage.

Practical implications

Continuous learning and unlearning is essential to the process of developing raw ideas into viable commercial applications. The key to success is to test assumptions through real‐life experiments – for example, market assumptions should be tested in‐market, manufacturability assumptions should be tested in production.

Originality/value

Firms should adopt assumption‐driven learning in a series of sequential divergent‐convergent cycles – one cycle per stage – each centered on testing the major assumptions for that stage.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Amy Muller, Liisa Välikangas and Paul Merlyn

During the past year, the authors have built a framework for a suite of metrics that senior managers can customize to track and promote innovation success in their companies.

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Abstract

Purpose

During the past year, the authors have built a framework for a suite of metrics that senior managers can customize to track and promote innovation success in their companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Senior executives can use the suite of metrics to assess their company's innovativeness over time and hence combat the insidious strategy decay that often afflicts a company's business.

Findings

The framework combines three views on innovation – resource, capability, and leadership – providing the perspective to develop a suite of metrics for assessing and developing a company's capacity for innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The optimal selection of metrics and the optimal value or “sweet spot” of any particular metric will vary from company to company.

Practical implications

As more firms develop strategic innovation metrics and a database that validates their relevance, top managers will learn to assess and guide a company's innovation capability more effectively.

Originality/value

This is the first strategic guideline for building a customizable system of innovation metrics.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Amy Muller and Nate Hutchins

This paper posits that by selectively applying open innovation, companies can enrich their stock of valuable ideas, effectively manage product development and upgrade

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper posits that by selectively applying open innovation, companies can enrich their stock of valuable ideas, effectively manage product development and upgrade their emerging businesses without wholesale changes to their innovation initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study of the open innovation process at Whirlpool Corporation written by two Strategos consultants who have worked with the firm.

Findings

Whirlpool has developed a set of questions and discussion guides that help to inform the decision to go “open” or not at each step of the innovation process.

Practical implications

Whirlpool believes that open innovation is really about building and maintaining relationships and alliances. These relationships are managed by “relationship managers” as part of the new business development activities.

Originality/value

By changing the context to competences within any organization, not just Whirlpool, the company is now considering and pursuing a number of opportunities that would have previously been rejected, and Whirlpool is successfully expanding its business to adjacent spaces through the help of open innovation partners.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

In 1991, aged 29, Park Byeong Yong of South Korea applied to numerous banks for a loan to start up a business. He did not come from a family of business leaders and…

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Abstract

In 1991, aged 29, Park Byeong Yong of South Korea applied to numerous banks for a loan to start up a business. He did not come from a family of business leaders and neither did he have his degree from one of the top universities. Perhaps needless to say, his loan applications did not get far. Determined, however, Park raised cash from friends and personal savings and went ahead with his venture. Just over ten years on his company, Pantech, is the third largest mobile manufacturer in South Korea, and has successfully established itself as a key player within both the home and overseas markets. Park is clearly doing something right.

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Strategic Direction, vol. 19 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Robert M. Randall

295

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Robert M. Randall

421

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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