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Article

Raymond P. Fisk, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Laurel Anderson, David E. Bowen, Thorsten Gruber, Amy L. Ostrom and Lia Patrício

Elevating the human experience (HX) through research collaborations is the purpose of this article. ServCollab facilitates and supports service research collaborations…

Abstract

Purpose

Elevating the human experience (HX) through research collaborations is the purpose of this article. ServCollab facilitates and supports service research collaborations that seek to reduce human suffering and improve human well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

To catalyze this initiative, the authors introduce ServCollab's three human rights goals (serve, enable and transform), standards of justice for serving humanity (distributive, procedural and interactional justice) and research approaches for serving humanity (service design and community action research).

Research implications

ServCollab seeks to advance the service research field via large-scale service research projects that pursue theory building, research and action. Service inclusion is the first focus of ServCollab and is illustrated through two projects (transformative refugee services and virtual assistants in social care). This paper seeks to encourage collaboration in more large-scale service research projects that elevate the HX.

Practical implications

ServCollab seeks to raise the aspirations of service researchers, expand the skills of service research teams and build mutually collaborative service research approaches that transform human lives.

Originality/value

ServCollab is a unique organization within the burgeoning service research community. By collaborating with service researchers, with service research centers, with universities, with nonprofit agencies and with foundations, ServCollab will build research capacity to address large-scale human service system problems. ServCollab takes a broad perspective for serving humanity by focusing on the HX. Current business research focuses on the interactive roles of customer experience and employee experience. From the perspective of HX, such role labels are insufficient concepts for the full spectrum of human life.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article

Geraldine Rosa Henderson, Tracy Rank-Christman, Tiffany Barnett White, Kimberly Dillon Grantham, Amy L. Ostrom and John G. Lynch

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providersā€…

Abstract

Purpose

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providersā€™ ability to recognition faces of both black and white consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were administered to understand how intercultural competence impacts recognition of black and white consumer faces.

Findings

The authors find that the more intercultural competence that respondents report with blacks, the better they are at distinguishing between black regular customers and black new shoppers in an experiment. The authors find no impact of intercultural competence on the ability of respondents to differentiate between white consumers. These findings hold for respondents in the USA and South Africa.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this research is that the studies were conducted in a controlled lab setting. Thus, one could imagine additional noise from a true consumer setting might increase the effects of these results. Another limitation is the focus on only black and white consumer faces. In this paper, the authors focused on these two races, specifically to keep the factorial design as simplified as possible.

Originality/value

The implications of this research are important given that the ability of employeesā€™ recognizing customer faces can affect customersā€™ day-to-day interactions in the marketplace.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Amy L. Ostrom and Dawn Iacobucci

This paper aims to examine the status of service guarantees specifically, and cues to quality more generally.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the status of service guarantees specifically, and cues to quality more generally.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflection on the 1998 Journal of Services Marketing article with views both to the academic literature and the presence of guarantees in industry.

Findings

Service guarantees still exist, sometimes in their original form (e.g. ā€œ100 per cent satisfaction guaranteed!ā€) and sometimes in a morphed form (e.g. retailersā€™ promises of price-matching). Research has continued to focus on understanding service guarantees yet there are additional questions left to be addressed. There are also numerous other types of information, in addition to service guarantees, consumers may use as cues to quality.

Practical lmplications

Service guarantees remain an important and useful tool for services marketers to signal their quality to their customers and to reduce the uncertainty surrounding many services purchases. Other information such as online ratings and reviews through social media can also serve as strong informational cues.

Originality/value

In providing cues to customers about quality, while marketers have long considered the value of price and brand names, the usefulness of service guarantees is still under-studied.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Amy L. Ostrom and Dawn Iacobucci

Recently, several service firms (e.g. Hampton Inn, Delta Dental Plan of Massachusetts) have successfully implemented service guarantees. Little research, however, has been…

Abstract

Recently, several service firms (e.g. Hampton Inn, Delta Dental Plan of Massachusetts) have successfully implemented service guarantees. Little research, however, has been done examining the conditions under which service guarantees are the most effective. The current research examines how the presence of a guarantee affects consumersā€™ preā€purchase evaluations. It also investigates interactions between multiple extrinsic cues such as the presence of a guarantee and information about the quality level of firm offering the guarantee. The results suggest that while guarantees can enhance consumersā€™ perceptions of quality, especially in situations characterized by greater service quality variability, they are less effective in the presence of other quality cues.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Nancy V. Wuenderlich, Kristina Heinonen, Amy L. Ostrom, Lia Patricio, Rui Sousa, Chris Voss and Jos G.A.M. Lemmink

The purpose of this paper is to craft a future research agenda to advance smart service research and practice. Smart services are delivered to or via intelligent objects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to craft a future research agenda to advance smart service research and practice. Smart services are delivered to or via intelligent objects that feature awareness and connectivity. For service researchers and managers, one of the most fascinating aspects of smart service provision is that the connected object is able to sense its own condition and its surroundings and thus allows for real-time data collection, continuous communication and interactive feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is based on discussions in the workshop on ā€œFresh perspectives on technology in serviceā€ at the International Network of Service Researchers on September 26, 2014 at CTF, Karlstad, Sweden. The paper summarizes the discussion on smart services, adds an extensive literature review, provides examples from business practice and develops a structured approach to new research avenues.

Findings

We propose that smart services vary on their individual level of autonomous decision-making, visibility and embeddedness in objects and customer lives. Based on a discussion of these characteristics, we identify research avenues regarding the perception and nature of smart services, the adoption of smart services, the innovation through smart services as well as regarding the development of new business models.

Originality/value

Smart services is a new emerging topic in service marketing research, their implications on organizations, customers and the service landscape have not been fully explored. We provide a fresh perspective on service research by characterizing relevant aspects of smart service that will stimulate fruitful future research and advance the understanding and practice of smart services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 29 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Mark S. Rosenbaum, Amy L. Ostrom and Ronald Kuntze

Previous research has explored the impact of customer participation in organizationalā€sponsored loyalty programs on customer loyalty; however, the findings are mixed…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has explored the impact of customer participation in organizationalā€sponsored loyalty programs on customer loyalty; however, the findings are mixed. Other research, outside the loyalty program literature, reveals that customers who socially interact with other customers, via participation in brand communities, often exhibit an intense loyalty to the sponsoring brands. Proposes to investigate the following questions: ā€œCan loyalty programs be differentiated based on whether or not members perceive a sense of community?ā€; and ā€œDoes a perception of a sense of community impact member loyalty to sponsoring organizations?ā€

Design/methodology/approach

Qā€technique factor analysis is utilized analyzing statements from loyalty program participants. Principal component factor and cluster analyses confirm a twoā€tiered classification schema distinguishing loyalty programs based on perceptions of communal benefits. Differences between the two factors are explored. A survey developed from the Qā€sort analysis was then administered to 153 loyalty program participants, providing evidence that consumers are more loyal to communal programs.

Findings

Loyalty programs can be distinguished based on the sense of community which members perceive. Furthermore, consumers are more loyal to communal programs than to programs that simply use financial incentives. Communal programs elicit stronger emotional connections and participants are significantly less predisposed to competitor switching.

Originality/value

This study integrates the theory of sense of community into the marketing literature, also offering researchers a nineā€item, unidimensional scale to measure the construct within the context of loyalty programs. Confusion in the literature regarding the efficacy of loyalty programs is diminished by showing a positive relationship between loyalty and a member's perceptions of community.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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Article

Roderick J. Brodie and Anders Gustafsson

The purpose of this paper is to explore enhancing theory development in service research and provide an overview of the five essays on theorizing initiated by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore enhancing theory development in service research and provide an overview of the five essays on theorizing initiated by the International Network for Service Research workshop, held at Karlstad, Sweden in September 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative theorizing process which was initiated at the Karlstad, Sweden workshop.

Findings

Six (five from the event and the introduction) original and provocative essays that explore different aspects of theorizing in service research.

Originality/value

Exploring how a collaborative approach to research can be used.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article

Andrei Bonamigo and Camila Guimarães Frech

This study aims to recognize industry 4.0 opportunities and challenges associated with the co-creation of value in industrial services and to propose a theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to recognize industry 4.0 opportunities and challenges associated with the co-creation of value in industrial services and to propose a theoretical framework for smart industrial services systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a systematic literature review based on the systematic search flow method; thereafter, the authors used the content analysis proposed by Bardin (2011) to analyze the resulting portfolio.

Findings

The authors identified a total of five industry 4.0 opportunities and five challenges for co-creating value in industrial services. Drawing upon these findings, this paper builds a theoretical framework for the smart industrial services system, in which the industry 4.0 opportunities arise from the digitally mediated inter-firm interactions and the challenges related to the resources of this system.

Research limitations/implications

This study may not have enabled a complete coverage of all existing peer-reviewed articles in the field of value co-creation in industrial services associated with the industry 4.0 technologies. Also, the framework is constrained by being theoretical rather than empirically grounded.

Practical implications

The findings give managers support to devise strategies for overcoming the barriers that impede them from taking advantage of the opportunities offered by industry 4.0 for co-creating value in industrial services.

Originality/value

This paperā€™s uniqueness is to identify the industry 4.0 opportunities and challenges for value co-creation in the context of industrial services and to propose a framework for the smart industrial services system.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Derek Kauneckis and Mark T. Imperial

This paper examines the emergence of collaborative watershed management in Lake Tahoe by focusing on how institutions managing coordination and conflict have changed over…

Abstract

This paper examines the emergence of collaborative watershed management in Lake Tahoe by focusing on how institutions managing coordination and conflict have changed over time. It begins by describing the evolution of watershed governance and examines the extent to which the institutional arrangement demonstrates the eight design principles proposed by Elinor Ostrom for successful common pool resource (CPR) management. The paper then develops the concept of a complex environmental commons (CEC) to differentiate the situation of Lake Tahoe from the simpler CPR dilemmas frequently discussed in the CPR literature. We then propose five additional principles that contribute to collaborative management of a CEC.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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