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Abstract

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Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Amy Klemm Verbos and Maria T. Humphries

The purpose of this paper is to bring wider‐reaching feminism to confluence with relational indigenous values for transformative responses to systemic exclusion.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring wider‐reaching feminism to confluence with relational indigenous values for transformative responses to systemic exclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critique the prevailing (corporate) institutional logic in higher education through their stories and experiences, weaving in diverse feminist perspectives. Liberal feminist perspectives, the most visible gender critique, may merely increase numerical equality, diversifying the biographical characteristics of privilege. Exclusion for many is systemically retained. The authors argue that relational logics underpinning indigenous worldviews hold generative potential for institutional change toward deeper inclusiveness and justice.

Findings

Liberal feminists' two‐fold transformative aspirations for gender equality and deeper respect for currently marginalized “feminine” values leave room for deeper and wider reflection on how indigenous perspectives might contribute to institutional change.

Practical implications

This exploration may be applied to university recruiting, selection, evaluation, and promotion policies; articulating and assessing career competencies and trajectories; curriculum evaluation; organizational and management research; and pedagogical development and research.

Social implications

An indigenous critique of liberal feminism and indigenous perspectives on justice, relationality, and inclusivity may enhance social, university, corporate, community, and family life.

Originality/value

Interweaving feminist and indigenous insights into a critique of the prevailing corporate institutional logic informing organizational practice – in higher education and all sectors of society, it highlights the generative potential of indigenous contributions and encourages inclusion of diverse indigenous perspectives in organization theory and practice.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Amy Klemm Verbos and Maria T. Humphries

The Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) are a United Nations led initiative that includes a mandate to engage with voices generally marginalized in…

Abstract

Purpose

The Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) are a United Nations led initiative that includes a mandate to engage with voices generally marginalized in business classrooms. The voices of Indigenous peoples are among such marginalized voices. Inclusion of indigenous worldviews offer opportunities to enhance the capacity of the PRME to contribute to more just and sustainable management and development of humanity. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

PRME Principle One inspires opportunities to integrate the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (DRIP) and through this confluence, contribute to manifesting the espoused aspirations of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) – i.e. the transformation of poverty and environmental degradation toward universal human and environmental thriving.

Findings

Greater attention to relational ethics through critical pedagogy encourages reflection on the paradoxes of the market logic that permeates management education. The outcome in practice of this logic appears to result in ever increasing disparity. Its unfettered trajectory risks both people and planet. An indigenous call to respect all life, including that of the planet, brings the principles of universal inclusiveness to light in a compelling way.

Originality/value

This essay is unique in its call to construe together the PRME, UNGC, Business Reference Guide (BRG), and the DRIP to progress aspirations of inclusiveness and sustainability; and contribute indigenous worldviews for their intrinsic value in critical reflection on the damage caused by the market logic endemic to management education.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Amy Klemm Verbos and De Vee E. Dykstra

The purpose of this paper is to explore female business faculty perceptions about attrition from a business school to uncover factors that might assist in female faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore female business faculty perceptions about attrition from a business school to uncover factors that might assist in female faculty retention in business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative study approach and guided by past literature, the paper systematically analyses open-ended responses to interview questions and notes emergent themes.

Findings

The major themes that emerged as factors leading to attrition: first, an exclusionary and managerialist culture which marginalized and demoralized women; second, curtailed career opportunities, including a lack of gender equity in promotion and tenure; third, poor leadership; and fourth, break up of a critical mass of women. The factors then that might assist in female faculty retention are a critical mass of women, gender equity, inclusive, collaborative cultures, psychological safety, and ethical leadership. The career patterns of the women indicated that a labyrinth is an apt metaphor for their career paths.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines just one school from the perspective of women who left. It holds promise as the basis for future studies across business schools and to faculty within business schools to determine whether the emergent themes hold across schools.

Originality/value

This study examines women in business academe through the attraction-selection-attrition framework and by extending the labyrinth career metaphor to an academic setting. The paper also provides a conceptual model of female faculty retention.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2015

Amy Klemm Verbos, Deanna M. Kennedy, Joseph S. Gladstone and Carolyn Birmingham

The purpose of this paper is to develop two new constructs (career self-schemas and career locus) and present a conceptual model of the influence of Native American…

1113

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop two new constructs (career self-schemas and career locus) and present a conceptual model of the influence of Native American culture on MBA fit.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a social cognitive lens on career theory, the authors examine the possible effects of cultural influences on the fit between Native Americans’ career goals and an MBA. Specifically, the authors propose that cultural factors contribute to career self-schemas inconsistent with Native American perceptions of business graduate education. Career self-schemas are an individual’s cognitive map of the self in his or her career.

Findings

The conceptual model proposes that aspects of career self-schemas may explain lagging Native Americans’ MBA fit: the MBA is culturally inconsistent, and a community career locus.

Research limitations/implications

The model needs to be tested empirically. This research has implications that extend beyond Native Americans to help explain the career aspirations of other diverse groups.

Social implications

Native Americans are, in recent years, engaging in economic development that would benefit from Native Americans with MBAs. The authors make recommendations for increasing Native American interest in MBA programs.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the constructs of career self-schemas and career locus to explain lagging MBA fit for Native Americans. The constructs may also be applied in other cultures and with other ethnic groups to explain differences in career choice. It may be particularly helpful in an international context.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Amy Klemm Verbos, Janice S. Miller and Ashita Goswami

The paper uses social cognitive theory to explore reactions to performance evaluation processes as situated cognitions by examining the relationship between key elements…

2140

Abstract

Purpose

The paper uses social cognitive theory to explore reactions to performance evaluation processes as situated cognitions by examining the relationship between key elements of employees’ schemas about an organizational environment, preparation for evaluation, and these reactions. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey of 260 employees of eight organizations in a Midwestern US city.

Findings

Job resource adequacy, communication adequacy, coworker relationships, and preparation time are significantly and positively associated with employee reactions to performance evaluation processes. Preparation time moderates the association between organizational context and employee reactions.

Research limitations/implications

A social cognitive perspective on performance evaluation broadens the scope of extant research. This study is limited by cross-sectional design but opens the door to future experimental and longitudinal research.

Practical implications

Performance evaluation processes are situated in an organizational context. Organizational interventions to improve perceptions of this key process could focus on better communication and encouraging preparation, especially if job resources are less adequate.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the performance evaluation literature by applying social cognitive theory to performance evaluation reactions as situated cognitions, calling attention to the broader organizational context in which these processes occur.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

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