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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Jacqueline Graves, Amunpreet Boyal, Tracey Shields, Roger Newham, Alistair Hewison and Louise Terry

This paper aims to report findings of a service evaluation using a human rights-based approach in the training and education of staff in palliative settings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report findings of a service evaluation using a human rights-based approach in the training and education of staff in palliative settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A non-randomly sampled, uncontrolled, pre- and post-test design. Data was collected at three points over a six-month period during the period April 2017 to September 2019. As a service evaluation no ethical approval was required. Consent was implied by self-completion and submission of questionnaires. In total, 1,402 people attended the training, 480 completed pre- and post-training questionnaires (146 completed the questionnaire at six months), with 86 completing a questionnaire at all three data collection points.

Findings

Findings show increased levels of self-reported knowledge and confidence at two weeks and six months post-training. Implementing human rights in the workplace is complex. Difficulties maintaining knowledge and keeping up to date with changes in legislation and traditional ways of working were cited as barriers to service users’ human rights.

Research limitations/implications

More evaluation is required to ensure the positive elements in this evaluation can be applied more widely.

Practical implications

Human rights education has a contribution to make in supporting staff to manage the challenges involved. It may also increase the complexity of decision-making. Training needs to incorporate systems wide approaches and its benefits measured.

Social implications

The aim was to provide staff with the knowledge to make objective and proportionate decisions about personalised care. The assumption was this would help improve the experience of end of life care.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation in the UK that we are aware of that has examined the impact of human rights education on end of life care.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Amunpreet Boyal and Alistair Hewison

The aim of this paper is to explore Senior nurses’ experiences of leading organizational change. There is a substantial literature reporting middle-level nurse managers’…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore Senior nurses’ experiences of leading organizational change. There is a substantial literature reporting middle-level nurse managers’ experiences of change; however, there is less evidence concerning senior nurses’ perspectives. In view of this, interview data collected from senior nurses, as part of a study of major organizational change, were analysed to redress this imbalance.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 14) were conducted with senior nurses (between 2009 and 2012).

Findings

Senior nurses’ activity centred on leadership and workforce issues, internal influences and external pressures. In periods of change, appropriate leadership was vital, and “weak” leaders were considered to have an adverse effect on teams. Concerns were expressed about financial strictures and their impact on patient care and service provision. The senior nurses were striving to provide the best quality of service delivery with the limited resources available. Concentration on operational matters was necessary to maintain stability in periods of change. However, this prevented senior nurses from influencing strategic decision-making in their organizations.

Practical implications

If senior nurses are to realise their potential to operate at a strategic level, they need to be given time and support to lead, rather than just react to change. This research emphasises the importance of a “nursing voice” to inform board-level decisions and maintain a focus on patient care.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on the work of a key group of staff in health-care organizations. Understanding senior nurses’ experience of and contribution to change is a useful contribution to health services research.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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