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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Virginia Rolling and Amrut Sadachar

The purpose of this study is to examine how luxury brand descriptions influence millennials’ impression of luxury, impression of sustainability, attitude toward brand and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how luxury brand descriptions influence millennials’ impression of luxury, impression of sustainability, attitude toward brand and purchase intention using the impression formation theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experimental design was used to test the research model, wherein two randomly assigned groups received an online experiment with either a luxury-only or a sustainable-luxury brand description.

Findings

Findings included that the impression of luxury did not change for a sustainable-luxury brand describing the use of recycled materials as compared to a luxury-only brand without the description of recycled materials present. Therefore, millennials perceived the luxury-only and sustainable-luxury brands to provide an impression of luxury, which was the sole impression to significantly predict attitude toward the brand. In addition, the results indicated that attitude positively influenced purchase intention for both brand descriptions.

Originality/value

This study provides support for luxury brands to transition toward sustainable efforts of using recycled materials in their goods as the impression of luxury is preserved, and provide marketing communication that favors sustainable brand positioning. This is one of the first empirical studies that focused on exploring sustainability strategies for luxury brands targeting a specific market segment (i.e. millennials in the United States of America).

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Subhro Sarkar, Arpita Khare and Amrut Sadachar

The purpose of this paper is to validate the consumer styles inventory (CSI) scale for understanding the decision-making styles of shopping app users. The validated scales…

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1924

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate the consumer styles inventory (CSI) scale for understanding the decision-making styles of shopping app users. The validated scales are used to examine the relationship between consumers’ decision-making styles and factors affecting the use of mobile shopping apps.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 428 valid responses are collected from the users of the five most popular shopping apps. The mobile shopping apps are selected based on a popularity study. Data are collected from mobile app shoppers through an online survey.

Findings

Findings reveal a new set of factors that can be used for understanding use of mobile shopping apps. Decision-making styles influence the adoption of mobile apps for shopping. Factors responsible for the adoption of mobile shopping apps such as usefulness and risk perceptions differ across consumers with different decision-making styles.

Practical implications

The findings would facilitate online retailers in building focused marketing strategies for segmenting and targeting the consumers having different decision-making styles.

Originality/value

The current research is the first of its kind to examine the applicability of the CSI scale in the context of mobile app shoppers in an emerging economy. The findings enrich the existing literature by providing empirical support to the relationship between decision-making styles and factors affecting adoption of shopping using mobile apps.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Arpita Khare, Amrut Sadachar and Swagata Chakraborty

The study examined the role of collective self-esteem (CSE), online communities, green attitudes and the influence of celebrities on green clothing involvement and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examined the role of collective self-esteem (CSE), online communities, green attitudes and the influence of celebrities on green clothing involvement and consequently its impact on green clothing purchase behavior of Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A mix of convenience and random sampling was used for data collection via an online survey. The sample (n = 403) comprised consumers having awareness about green clothing. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for analysis.

Findings

Online communities, green attitudes and influence of celebrities predicted green clothing involvement and in turn their purchase behavior. CSE had no impact on consumers' green clothing involvement.

Practical implications

The findings can help green apparel manufacturers and designers to use celebrities and online communities to educate and promote the benefits of green clothing. Social media can be employed to share experiences and engage consumers about green clothing.

Originality/value

Since online networking sites are gaining predominance in influencing behavior, the study extends the earlier research on social influence by examining its role along with celebrities and CSE on green apparel involvement and purchase. The study combines celebrities, online communities and collective identity influences (offline and online) in predicting green clothing purchase in India.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Amrut Sadachar and Ann Marie Fiore

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether experiential offerings from two types of retailers play a significant role in consumer responses toward Indian malls…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether experiential offerings from two types of retailers play a significant role in consumer responses toward Indian malls. Specifically, this study examined the relationships between consumer perceptions of experience economy 4E constructs (i.e. educational, entertainment, escapist, and esthetic experiences) and experiential value associated with merchandise retailers and service retailers in Indian shopping malls, and between perceived experiential value and mall patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall intercept survey conducted in two shopping malls in India resulted in 552 useable responses. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Experience economy constructs (i.e. entertainment, escapist, and esthetic experiences) contributed to the experiential value associated with merchandise retailers and/or service retailers in the mall. Experiential value associated with both merchandise retailers and service retailers in the mall positively influenced mall patronage intention.

Practical implications

The results have practical implications for mall retailers, mall managers, and mall developers; particular experiential strategies for both merchandise retailers and service retailers may improve patronage intentions toward the mall, which includes a measure of purchase intentions.

Originality/value

Although academic articles support the idea that retailers can obtain benefits by offering experiences to consumers, this is the first study to empirically validate the role of specific consumer experiences, the 4Es, resulting from both merchandise retailers and service retailers, in a non-Western mall context on value creation for shoppers and the consequent influence on patronage intentions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Swagata Chakraborty and Amrut Sadachar

The present study compared Indian consumers' attitude (AT) toward and purchase intention (PI) from Western apparel brands, as a function of their Western acculturation…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study compared Indian consumers' attitude (AT) toward and purchase intention (PI) from Western apparel brands, as a function of their Western acculturation (WA), consumer ethnocentrism (CE) in apparel consumption, consumer cosmopolitanism (CC) and country of residence (India vs the USA).

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included Indians residing in India and the USA, who were 19 years or older, and visited online or brick-and-mortar apparel stores. An online survey was administered through Amazon Mechanical Turk to collect the data. The data was analyzed through multi-group structural equation modeling.

Findings

WA engenders CE among Indian consumers, especially among Indians residing in India. WA and CC positively influence AT. CE did not have a significant negative influence on AT. Although a high CE lowers the PI, a high WA, CC and positive AT can translate into high PI.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not use an experimental design. Therefore, causal relationships between the research variables could not be explained. Majority of the respondents were male. This might have confounded the findings with potential gendered effects.

Practical implications

Western apparel brands targeting Indian consumers in India and the USA should focus on projecting their cosmopolitan and pro-Indian image to target this population's cosmopolitan and ethnocentric outlook, thereby enhancing PI.

Originality/value

The study proposed and empirically tested a conceptual model indicating the relationship between some of the important predictors of Indian consumers' PI in the context of Indians residing in the USA and India.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Srikant Manchiraju and Amrut Sadachar

The role of personal values in consumer behavior is well documented; however, in the context of fashion consumption, the role of personal values’ influence on consumers…

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15075

Abstract

Purpose

The role of personal values in consumer behavior is well documented; however, in the context of fashion consumption, the role of personal values’ influence on consumers’ ethical behavior has not been studied. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to seek to explore whether consumers’ personal values predict consumers’ behavioral intentions to engage in ethical fashion consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study employed the Fritzsche model, which states that an individual's personal values are related to his/her intentions to engage in ethical behavior. The present study examined the causal relationship between the personal values and behavioral intentions to engage in ethical fashion consumption. Data collected from the US national sample were subjected to structural equation modeling.

Findings

The proposed model explained 42 percent of variance in consumer's behavioral intentions toward ethical fashion consumption. Furthermore, a significant negative relationship between self-enhancement personal values and behavioral intention toward ethical fashion consumption was found. Several theoretical and practical implications related to the present study were discussed.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, the study is first of its kind in several aspects: first, ethical fashion consumption has been conceptualized in the broadest definition possible, as oppose to focussing on a particular facet of fashion consumption (e.g. organic products or counterfeit fashion); second, linking consumer personal values as a predictor of his/her ethical fashion consumption behavioral intentions; and third, employing the Fritzsche model in fashion behavior context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Jihyeong Son, Amrut Sadachar, Srikant Manchiraju, Ann Marie Fiore and Linda S. Niehm

“Collaborative customer co‐design websites” (CCCWs), reflect a combination of co‐design and social networking. While this technology is presently emerging, little research…

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1653

Abstract

Purpose

“Collaborative customer co‐design websites” (CCCWs), reflect a combination of co‐design and social networking. While this technology is presently emerging, little research has explored consumer perception of the underlying benefits and impediments of CCCW features. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived benefits and impediments offered by a CCCW and its influence on consumer acceptance of this technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) with additional variables (perceived playfulness, perceived social risk, and mass confusion) was employed to examine the effects of CCCW features on consumers' beliefs about the CCCW and their consequent intention to use a CCCW. An online, scenario‐based survey was used to collect responses from college students (n=223). Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results of structural model testing indicated that perceived playfulness had the largest influence on intentions to use the CCCW. Additionally, perceived social risk associated with the CCCW negatively influenced consumers' intention to use the website. Contrary to expectations, mass confusion positively influenced consumers' intentions to use the CCCW.

Originality/value

Successful online co‐design retailers have begun to utilize social networking features for customer collaboration. Yet, there is scant research that explores the features leading to consumer acceptance of this technology during the collaborative customer co‐design process. Focusing on this problem, the present paper empirically tested perceived benefits and impediments regarding acceptance of a CCCW. The findings suggest that online retailers who adopt a CCCW as a business strategy may relay the value added benefits to consumers by: promoting how this technology relieves customers' perceived social risk; and underscoring the fun and enjoyment aspects of CCCWs to encourage website use and patronage.

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Steve Dix

Downloads
1969

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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