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1 – 10 of 205
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Huda Masood, Len Karakowsky and Mark Podolsky

This study aims to investigate the link between amotivation and workplace deviance. The authors further outlined how the relationship between amotivation and deviant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the link between amotivation and workplace deviance. The authors further outlined how the relationship between amotivation and deviant behavior can be mitigated via proactive work strategies such as job crafting and career outcome expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a convergent design, mixed-method study to investigate workplace deviance as an outcome of amotivation or the lack of motivation towards an activity. The quantitative data from cross-sectional surveys entailed 127 respondents. The qualitative data comprised of 25 in-depth interviews. The authors sought insights from individuals' lived experiences to understand how amotivated individuals behave at work.

Findings

The quantitative findings contended a significant relationship between amotivation and organizational deviance. The authors also found evidence for the buffering role of career outcome expectations on amotivation and deviance. Finally, avoidance job crafting has been shown to significantly attenuate the aforementioned relationship. The qualitative study identified three broader themes about amotivated individuals' work outcomes.

Practical implications

Amotivation can arise among individuals who feel trapped in a job they want to exit and can result in a range of dysfunctional outcomes including workplace deviance. While amotivated employees may be hard to flag, employers can keep such individuals from demonstrating workplace deviance through placing interventions such as job crafting and career development programs.

Originality/value

The existing literature on work motivation has predominantly overlooked the role of amotivation in determining employee outcomes. The current research generates a new line of inquiry by identifying workplace deviance as an outcome of amotivation. The authors further highlighted that such dysfunctional outcomes of amotivation can be mitigated by job crafting and career outcomes expectancies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose:

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design:

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings:

North American study shows connection between amotivation and organisational deviance. The authors also found evidence for the mitigating role of career outcome expectations on deviance and amotivation. A final observation was that avoidance job crafting reduced the risks significantly.

Originality:

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Kevin Ferger and Isabel D.W. Rechberg

This study aims to evaluate the impact of extrinsic, intrinsic and amotivation on an individual’s knowledge-sharing behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the impact of extrinsic, intrinsic and amotivation on an individual’s knowledge-sharing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the literature on self-determination theory (SDT) as an applied predictor of knowledge-sharing behavior, and documented the extent to which SDT conceptual framework components have been studied in relation to predict knowledge sharing.

Findings

Building from SDT and its sub-theories, this study uncovers a gap in the knowledge-sharing literature as the continuum of the SDT framework has yet to fully be applied to knowledge-sharing behavior.

Originality/value

Contributing to the literature on knowledge management and knowledge sharing, this study is the first, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, of its kind to apply Deci and Ryan’s self-determination continuum, in its entirety, to a knowledge-sharing conceptual framework. The authors thereby address the potential impact of amotivation on an individual’s knowledge-sharing behavior.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Opal Donaldson and Evan W. Duggan

The purpose of this research is to develop a Social Information System research model that uses the core constructs intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to develop a Social Information System research model that uses the core constructs intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and amotivation to explain social networking adoption among tweens, teens and young adults.

Methodology

In developing the research model, we triangulated theories to examine the different orientations of motivation. The data collection process included a stratified sample size of 270 respondents. Following data collection we analyzed the results using structural equation modeling in the Partial Least Square software package.

Findings

The constructs amotivation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivations were all statistically significant in explaining continuance intention to use social networking services (SNS).

Practical implications

Researchers and practitioners have intimated that although there has been a rise in the number of persons accessing and becoming members of SNS, several subscribers who join subsequently leave after a minimal period. The practical implication of this study lies in providing a preliminary understanding of what determines or inhibits continuance intention of SNS membership.

Originality/value

Despite efforts, research in IS and technology acceptance literature regarding SNS diffusion is limited in scope. The theoretical implication of this study lies in the model that has been developed and validated to provide a more effective tool for the scholarly evaluation of SNS adoption. Existing adoption models are insufficient to explain voluntary technology usage of this nature.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Robin Pentecost, Denni Arli and Sharyn Thiele

The purpose of this paper is to investigate barriers to pro-social behaviour in the form of blood donating using self-determination theory.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate barriers to pro-social behaviour in the form of blood donating using self-determination theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Respondents were recruited through intercepts at a major international university and at points within the community in a capital city in Australia. Sampling was conducted over a three-week period resulting in a sample of 617 respondents.

Findings

Results show intrinsic motivations positively influence intentions towards blood donation, self-identity, and locus of control. Further, despite positively influencing other factors, external regulation positively influenced amotivation indicating the more likely people feel pressured to donate blood, the less likely they will be motivated to donate blood.

Originality/value

This would suggest one way to influence more people to become donors is to place greater focus on the positive emotional feelings they derive from the act of donating blood and the control they have over that donation. Using external regulation strategy which often suggests people “must” or “have-to” donate blood may be limiting blood donation numbers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2009

Kenneth J. Smith, Jeanette A. Davy and Donald L. Rosenberg

This study uses structural equation modeling to examine the influence of academic motivation on reported prior cheating behavior, neutralization tendencies, and likelihood…

Abstract

This study uses structural equation modeling to examine the influence of academic motivation on reported prior cheating behavior, neutralization tendencies, and likelihood of future cheating among accounting majors. It also investigates the impact of prior cheating on neutralization of cheating behaviors and the likelihood of future cheating, as well as the potential mediating effects of neutralization on future cheating behavior. Our results support differentiation of the theoretical constructs within the specified process model, and also show significant positive associations between an amotivational orientation and prior cheating, neutralization, and the likelihood of future cheating.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-882-3

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Stephanie Gilbert, Patrick Horsman and E. Kevin Kelloway

The purpose of this paper is to address the question of what motivates leaders to engage in effective leadership behaviours by integrating transformational leadership…

6348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the question of what motivates leaders to engage in effective leadership behaviours by integrating transformational leadership theory and self-determination theory. The authors propose that the type of enacted leadership behaviour is related to level of self-determined motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents validity evidence for an 18-item scale of motivation for transformational leadership based on Gagné and Deci’s (2005) six levels of internalization. A total of 310 employees (mean age=39, 64.5 per cent female, 46 per cent formal leaders) completed the scale, other measures of leadership, and job satisfaction.

Findings

Results supported the theorized six-factor structure of the scale and provided evidence for incremental validity in the prediction of job satisfaction and transformational leadership above and beyond another measure of motivation to lead.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of amotivation and the presence of autonomously controlled extrinsic motivation are predictive of effective leadership behaviour, a key finding with implications for leadership selection. The study was limited by the use of self-report data. Future studies should examine additional predictors and outcomes of the construct (e.g. subordinate attitudes or performance and leader personality), and whether it is stable over time.

Originality/value

Leaders’ motivation for role effectiveness is an unexplored area of research. This study suggests that type of motivation can be important for effective leadership and provides a validated scale for use in future leadership research and selection.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Monowar Mahmood, Yuliya Frolova and Bhumika Gupta

Personality traits are assumed to influence cognitive processes as well as academic motivation and learning approaches of the students. Based on these assumptions, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Personality traits are assumed to influence cognitive processes as well as academic motivation and learning approaches of the students. Based on these assumptions, the present study investigates the association of HEXACO personality traits with academic motivation as well as influence of those traits on students' learning approaches in educational contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-reported measures of personality orientation, academic motivation and learning approaches were obtained from 404 respondents in a classroom environment. The SPSS 20 software was used to conduct the correlations and the hierarchical regression analyses. The Eviews 10 software was used to develop the structural equation model to find the inter-relations among the study variables.

Findings

The findings reveal the influence of personality traits on academic motivation and learning approaches of the students. Among different personality traits, consciousness appeared to have highly positive impact on deep learning and intrinsic motivation of the studies. Neuroticism appeared to have most negative impact related to surface learning and amotivation of the learning contents.

Research limitations/implications

The findings validates the existence of HEXACO personality traits among the students in central Asian context. It future reiterated individual differences in learning strategies and learning motivation among the learners. The results may help academics and policy makers take appropriate measures to increase academic motivation and select appropriate learning approaches.

Originality/value

This is one of the pioneer studies to investigate the relationship between HEXACO personality traits, learning strategies and academic motivation. Validation of the HEXACO framework will help to understand students' personality in a more detailed and elaborative way and will contribute to the existing literature on personality and learning outcomes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Rabia Imran, Kamaal Allil and Ali Bassam Mahmoud

The purpose of this paper is to explore the path of motivation leading to organizational commitment resulting in reduced turnover intentions (TIs). It examine the…

2044

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the path of motivation leading to organizational commitment resulting in reduced turnover intentions (TIs). It examine the relationship between dimensions of motivation (amotivation, introjected regulations (IRs) and intrinsic motivation (IM)) with dimensions of commitment (affective, normative and continuance). Furthermore, it test the effect of these three dimensions of commitment on TIs.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 467 teachers working in public schools in Dhofar Governate in Sultanate of Oman was selected for the study. A path analysis was conducted to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

The analysis unveils that teacher’s TIs can be reduced with a right mix of motivation and commitment. Furthermore, amotivation is only linked to affective commitment and this linkage is positive; IRs positively affect continuance and normative commitment (NC); and IM positively affects affective commitment and NC. Moreover, a significant negative effect of affective, normative and continuance commitment is found on TIs.

Originality/value

This research sheds light on how motivation can indirectly affect TI through commitment. This study is of immense importance as it focuses on the education sector in Oman especially in Dhofar Governate.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Konstantinos Koronios, Marina Psiloutsikou and Athanasios Kriemadis

The purpose of this paper is to acquire improved comprehension of the motivational factors and the various constraints associated with individuals’ participation in mass…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to acquire improved comprehension of the motivational factors and the various constraints associated with individuals’ participation in mass running events.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method was used for the purpose of this research, and 1.357 questionnaires were completed. This study proposed two broad hypotheses: intrapersonal constraints influence motivation factors (amotivation, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation); and motivation factors influence the intention to continuous participation.

Findings

Both broad hypotheses were supported by the evidence while the lack of knowledge, interest, confidence and feelings of tiresomeness were found to contribute more to explaining motivation. All three motivational factors had a significant influence on intention.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical evidence for this study came from runners only. The special attributes of running may have influenced the explored relationships in a way that may not be directly applicable to other activities. Further research in various activities is necessary before such findings are generalized.

Originality/value

The aim of this paper is to provide empirical evidence of the relationships between the motivational factors and the various constraints associated with individuals’ participation in mass sporting and physical activity events. This research focused on developing a model to explain relationships among constraints, motivators and participation, and empirically test the proposed model within the marathon running participants context.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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