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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Mershack Opoku Tetteh, Albert P.C. Chan, Amos Darko, Sitsofe Kwame Yevu, Emmanuel B. Boateng and Janet Mayowa Nwaogu

International construction joint ventures (ICJVs) are an effective strategy for construction companies worldwide for delivering large and complex projects. Despite…

Abstract

Purpose

International construction joint ventures (ICJVs) are an effective strategy for construction companies worldwide for delivering large and complex projects. Despite numerous ICJVs studies, there is a lack of comprehensive empirical examination of what drives ICJVs implementation. This study aims to investigate the key drivers for implementing ICJVs through an international survey.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded on a comprehensive literature review and structured questionnaire survey, 123 ICJV experts' responses from 24 different countries/jurisdictions were analyzed using inferential and descriptive statistics. Mann–Whitney U test was used to determine any divergence of ranking of the drivers by the experts. Factor analysis (FA) was used to identify the clusters underlying the key drivers. Rank agreement analysis was later used to investigate the consensus between experts from developing and developed countries/jurisdictions on their ranking of the clusters.

Findings

Out of 34 factors, 26 factors greatly drive the implementation of ICJVs. Mann–Whitney U test results prove the absence of significant disparity among the experts in the ranking of the drivers. Six clusters were obtained through factor analysis (FA), namely, market-penetration and innovation-driven drivers, legal and market-driven drivers, fiscal incentives and market expansion drivers, personal branding drivers, sustainable advantage/power drivers and industrial and organizational promotion drivers. Rank agreement analysis exhibited varied levels of concurrence between professionals from developed and developing countries/jurisdictions.

Practical implications

The appreciation of the factors motivating ICJVs is beneficial to the successful implementation of ICJV strategies. A clear understanding of the drivers can help practitioners and policymakers to customize their ICJVs to reap the expected benefits.

Originality/value

The study has generated valuable insights into the factors that are greatly driving the implementation of ICJVs worldwide. While the findings of this study provide a profound contribution to theory and practice, it contributes to sustainable growth in different perspectives.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

M. Reza Hosseini, David John Edwards, Tandeep Singh, Igor Martek and Amos Darko

The construction industry faces three emergent developments that in all likelihood will transform the industry into the future. First, engineering project networks (EPNs)…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry faces three emergent developments that in all likelihood will transform the industry into the future. First, engineering project networks (EPNs), in which teams collaborate on projects remotely in time and space, are transforming global construction practices. Second, as a major consumer of resources and significant producer of green-house gases, construction is under pressure to reduce its carbon footprint. Third, the construction industry presents as one of the least socially sustainable work environments, with high job dissatisfaction, skewed work–life balance and over representation of depressive and mental disorders. It is incumbent on the industry to reconcile these issues. Specifically, what scope is there to shape the evolution of EPNs towards a configuration that both promotes sustainability generally, and enhances quality of work-life issues, while at the same time continuing to apprehend the economic dividends for which it is adopted? As salient as this question is, it has not been broached in the literature. Therefore, this study aims to survey the extent to which EPNs align with the sustainability agenda, more broadly, and that of employee work-place satisfaction, more specifically.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of current knowledge of these concerns is explored and a summative assessment presented.

Findings

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, as the first in its kind, the study brings to light that EPNs go a long way towards facilitating economic objectives, part way towards realising ecological and sociological objectives but make hardly any impact on improving employee work satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper examines an entirely novel area that has not been studied yet. Future research should take up this finding to determine how EPNs may be further adapted to accommodate these wider necessary objectives.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Mershack Opoku Tetteh, Albert P.C. Chan, Ernest Effah Ameyaw, Amos Darko, Sitsofe Kwame Yevu and Emmanuel B. Boateng

Management control is needed in international joint ventures (IJVs) for successful management and performance. While IJV management control and performance concept has…

Abstract

Purpose

Management control is needed in international joint ventures (IJVs) for successful management and performance. While IJV management control and performance concept has been widely explored, in the construction sector, the core understanding of the design of the two concepts is still lacking. This has resulted in the neglect of important questions and directions for research and practice improvement. This study aims to conduct a critical survey of prior studies addressing the conceptualization of management control and performance in IJVs and to propose a framework for studying the performance implications of management control in international construction joint ventures (ICJVs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using Scopus database and search terms, a systematic desktop search was conducted to retrieve empirically related peer-reviewed papers for this study.

Findings

Drawing on the transaction cost, institutional and relational logic, the first inclusive hypothetical model for studying the relationship between different dimensions of management control mechanism and multiple performance criteria in ICJVs is presented. The model proposes a measurement method for both the management control and performance and explains how they can be established in ICJVs.

Practical implications

The proposed framework provides a methodology to understand the dynamics of management control and performance implications in ICJV. Specifically, uncovering the critical paths will assist ICJV frontliners to approach management control in a more holistic and systematic way to promote achievement of ICJV goals.

Originality/value

The study gives a firm ground to the construction industry, which is accurate and educational for related fields concentrating on several other forms of cooperative relationships.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Frank Ato Ghansah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Joshua Ayarkwa, Amos Darko and David J. Edwards

This study investigates the underlying indicators for measuring the smartness of buildings in the construction industry; where the Smart Building Technology (SBT) concept…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the underlying indicators for measuring the smartness of buildings in the construction industry; where the Smart Building Technology (SBT) concept (which incorporates elements of the Zero Energy Building (NZEB) concept) could ensure efficient energy consumption and high performance of buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

An overarching post-positivist and empirical epistemological design was adopted to analyze primary quantitative data collected via a structured questionnaire survey with 227 respondents. The mean ranking analysis and one-sample t-test were employed to analyse data.

Findings

Research findings revealed that the level of knowledge of smart building indicators is averagely high in the Ghanaian construction industry. Future research is required to evaluate the awareness level of Smart Building Technologies (SBTs) by construction professionals and identify barriers to its adoption.

Originality/value

A blueprint guidance model (consisting of significant indicators for measuring building smartness) was developed to help improve building performance and inform policymakers.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Frank Ato Ghansah, Amos Darko, Richard Ohene Asiedu and David John Edwards

The purpose of this study is to investigate the insurable risks that impacted the operations on complex construction projects in developing countries using Ghana as a case study.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the insurable risks that impacted the operations on complex construction projects in developing countries using Ghana as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, structured questionnaires were used to collect relevant information from the top management of construction and insurance firms in Ghana, comprising 50 industry professionals. The study adopted the χ2 and independent samples’ t test to interpret the responses from participants.

Findings

The study revealed the major risks that severely impacted the operations on complex construction projects, including strikes and labour disputes, long waiting time for approval of test samples, damages to property during construction, delay in payment to contractor for work done, poor construction method, pressure to deliver project on an accelerated schedule, labour shortage, permits delayed or take longer than expected, inaccurate materials estimating, change in weather pattern, low productivity of subcontractors and inadequate contractor experience.

Practical implications

The study is expected to contribute to increase in the awareness of the insurable risks and policies that project participants are exposed to, which will serve as a decision-making tool for contract formation.

Originality/value

This study assists in managing construction and insurance firms to note the major risk in managing a complex construction project. In addition to knowing the major risks identified, the study investigates the insurable risk by managing both construction and insurance firms.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Frank Ato Ghansah, Amos Darko and Richard Ohene Asiedu

The insurance sector provides insurance protection for complex project deals in Ghana. The study assesses the service quality of insurance of complex project deals in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The insurance sector provides insurance protection for complex project deals in Ghana. The study assesses the service quality of insurance of complex project deals in the construction industry of developing countries, specifically Ghana. The objectives are to identify the insurance typologies in complex project deals in the construction industry, to assess the level of construction insurance quality, and to assess the challenges faced in complex project insurance.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review was conducted to analyze the previously related works on insurance in the construction industry. The study then adopted quantitative research strategy where a structured questionnaire survey was used to collect information from construction industry professionals. The data analysis was organized in accordance with the specific objectives of the study with the aid of mean score analysis and independent sample t-test. The study again measured the reliability of the adopted scale using Cronbach's alpha, which indicated that all the items reliably measured what they were intended to measure, and thereby, statistical tools can be applied to give in-depth meanings.

Findings

The insurance typologies for complex projects were discovered by the study, as well as the available service qualities of insurance. The study again made it clear that the major challenges capable of affecting complex construction project are low quality of insurance companies' services and the gap in statutory and legal systems.

Research limitation/implications

The major constraint in this study was the issue of taking only Ghana as a developing country to generalize the result. This is then to provide lessons for other developing countries.

Practical implication

The findings from this study will be useful to construction firms, insurance firms, and regulatory bodies by identifying the effectiveness of insurance as a risk mitigation measure in construction. The study will help the insurance firms to better position themselves to meet the demands of the construction industry. As the findings of this study are Ghana-specific, it is also to provide lessons for other developing countries.

Originality/value

This study delves deep into the complex construction project insurance service quality in developing countries, specifically Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Ayokunle Olubunmi Olanipekun, Olalekan Shamsideen Oshodi, Amos Darko and Temitope Omotayo

The development of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the construction sector is slow, thereby leaving many opportunities for further development. To enable…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the construction sector is slow, thereby leaving many opportunities for further development. To enable operators in the construction sector to effectively capitalise on the opportunities to promote the development of CSR in the sector, this study employs the practice viewpoint to take the stock of CSR activities in the sector. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the state of CSR practice in the construction sector. The study also draws from the development of CSR in the manufacturing, mining and banking sectors to inform the state of CSR practice in the construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This study carries out a systematic literature review of 56 journal publications that were published between the year 2000 and 2016. The deductive coding of the publications was done to identify four themes of CSR research that constitute the practice view of the state of CSR in the construction sector.

Findings

The implementation of CSR is the major emphasis in the state of CSR practice in the construction sector. The implementation of CSR is wrapped in the perception of operators about CSR potentials, dimensions of CSR implemented, strategies for implementation and the effects of the implemented CSR practices on performance. The sector characteristics and organisational structure are attributes for comparing the CSR practices between the construction sector and the manufacturing, mining and banking sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides a researchers’ view of the state of CSR in the construction sector. Additionally, the study draws from the development of CSR in the manufacturing, mining and banking sectors to inform the state of CSR practice in the construction sector.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Jin Xue, Geoffrey Qiping Shen, Rebecca Jing Yang, Irfan Zafar, E.M.A.C. Ekanayake, Xue Lin and Amos Darko

The purpose of this research is to seek better relational strategies between formal and informal stakeholder relationships to improve megaproject performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to seek better relational strategies between formal and informal stakeholder relationships to improve megaproject performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model was developed with twenty hypotheses based on the literature review. Then a questionnaire survey was conducted, and the collected data were analyzed by Partial Least squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) for validating the proposed model. Finally, the findings were discussed by a comparative study to explain the different effects of the formal and informal relationship on megaproject performance, and the managerial implications are presented for the stakeholders to implement the relationship management in the megaprojects.

Findings

The research finding reveals that formal relationship plays a dominating role in cost, quality, and labor protection; meanwhile, it is still more reliable in improving coordination, safety and environmental protection. Both formal and informal relationship is equally important towards collaboration and scheduling while the informal relationship is more effective in communication and project transparency.

Originality/value

The study extends the knowledge of relationship management in the domain of the megaproject performance. It provides a comprehensive and systematic understanding of the impact of formal and informal stakeholder relationships on ten aspects of the megaproject performance by the proposed conceptual model and PLS-SEM results. The research findings contribute to the theory of relationship management on how the different influences between formal and informal stakeholder relationships lead to better megaproject performance from inter-organizational level to project and societal level.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Janet M. Nwaogu, Albert P.C. Chan, Carol K.H. Hon and Amos Darko

The demanding nature of the construction industry poses strain that affects the health of construction personnel. Research shows that mental ill health in this industry is…

Abstract

Purpose

The demanding nature of the construction industry poses strain that affects the health of construction personnel. Research shows that mental ill health in this industry is increasing. However, a review mapping the field to determine the extant of research is lacking. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to conduct a scientometric review of mental health (MH) research in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 145 bibliographic records retrieved from Web of Science and Scopus database were analyzed using CiteSpace, to visualize MH research outputs in the industry.

Findings

Top co-cited authors are Helen Lingard, Mei-yung Leung, Paul Bowen, Julitta S. Boschman, Peter E.D. Love, Martin Loosemore and Linda Goldenhar. Previous studies focused on healthy eating, work efficiency, occupational stress and workplace injury. Emerging research areas are centered around physiological health monitoring, work ability, and smart interventions to prevent and manage poor MH.

Research limitations/implications

Result is influenced by the citations in retrieved articles.

Practical implications

The study found that researchers in the construction industry have intensified efforts to leverage information technology in improving the health, well-being, and safety of construction personnel. Future research should focus on developing workplace interventions that incorporate organizational justice and flexible work systems. There is also a need to develop psychological self-reporting scales specific to the industry.

Originality/value

This study enhances the understanding of researchers on existing collaboration networks and future research directions. It provides information on foundational documents and authors whose works should be consulted when researching into this field.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Ibrahim Yahaya Wuni, Geoffrey Qiping Shen and Amos Darko

Industrialized construction (IC) leverages manufacturing principles and innovative processes to improve the performance of construction projects. Though IC is gaining…

Abstract

Purpose

Industrialized construction (IC) leverages manufacturing principles and innovative processes to improve the performance of construction projects. Though IC is gaining popularity in the global construction industry, studies that establish the best practices for implementing IC projects are scarce. This study aims to benchmark practical lifecycle-based best practices for implementing IC projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative research design where nine IC cases from Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong were analysed to identify best practices. The methodological framework of the study followed well-established case study research cycle and guidelines, including planning, data collection, data analysis and reflection on findings.

Findings

The study identified and allocated key considerations, relevant stakeholders, best practices, typical deliverables and best indicators to the different construction lifecycle phases of IC projects. It also developed a lifecycle-based framework of the best practices for IC projects.

Practical implications

The study provides practitioners with practical insight into how best to effectively implement, manage and evaluate the performance of the IC project lifecycle phases. The proposed framework can serve as a practical diagnostic tool that enables project partners to evaluate the performance upfront progressively and objectively in each project lifecycle phase, which may inform timely corrective actions.

Originality/value

The study’s novelty lies in developing a framework that identifies and demonstrates the dynamic linkages among different sets of best practices, typical outputs and best practice indicators across the IC project lifecycle phases.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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