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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Razia Shaukat, Amna Yousaf and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights regarding the consequences of relationship conflict among employees in terms of their task performance, contextual…

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3388

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights regarding the consequences of relationship conflict among employees in terms of their task performance, contextual performance and turnover intentions. Utilizing a resource depletion approach in the backdrop of Conservation of Resources theory, it is hypothesized that the three-dimension burnout (exhaustion, cynicism and interpersonal strain) play a mediating role in influencing the linkages between relationship conflict and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 306 telecom engineers and their supervisors and analyzed using structural equation modeling to test the interrelationships among the study constructs.

Findings

Results indicated that relationship conflict is negatively related to task performance and contextual performance and positively relates to turnover intentions, and that the three dimensions of job burnout, i.e. exhaustion, cynicism and interpersonal strain at work, distinctively mediate the linkages between relationship conflict, task and contextual performance and turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study explores how relationship conflict transmits its effect to job performance and turnover intentions through mediation of burnout. All in all, the findings have important practical as well as theoretical implications for managers and academicians alike.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Abubakr Saeed, Amna Yousaf and Jaithen Alharbi

In times of vivid debates on the inclusion of women on boards, the purpose of this paper is to shed a new light on the composition of boardrooms in emerging market firms…

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1331

Abstract

Purpose

In times of vivid debates on the inclusion of women on boards, the purpose of this paper is to shed a new light on the composition of boardrooms in emerging market firms by investigating how family and state ownership affect board-gender diversity in the emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Tobit regression to examine the effect of firm ownership on board-gender diversity. A panel data set of Chinese and Indian firms for the period 2004-2013 is used to conduct this study.

Findings

The results show a negative and significant impact of family and state ownership on the proportion of women directors. However, this relationship is seen to be reverse if the firm is operating in international markets. Notably, a negative relationship was seen to persist between ownership structure and board-gender diversity for both female executive and independent board members, whereas a positive impact of internationalization was observed only for independent female directors.

Originality/value

This research addresses the board-gender diversity issue in emerging economies by focusing on firm characteristics which are unique to their business context. Further, this study identifies the conditions under which emerging market firms assimilate or proscribe women on their boards by recognizing the salient features of firms from emerging markets. Hence, in doing so, new evidence is added to the studies on the determinants of board-gender diversity. Lastly, it advances the earlier literature based on resource dependency and agency views and demonstrates the importance of internationalization for the inclusion of women on corporate boards.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Umair Ahmed, Waheed Ali Umrani, Amna Yousaf, Muhammad Athar Siddiqui and Munwar Hussain Pahi

This paper aims to assess the nexus between green human resource management (GHRM) practices, green culture, environmental responsibility and environmental performance (EP).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the nexus between green human resource management (GHRM) practices, green culture, environmental responsibility and environmental performance (EP).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a supervisor-subordinated nested design and multi-time data collection approach through convenience sampling, the authors obtained 330 responses from 15 hotels operating in the metropolitan cities of Pakistan.

Findings

The study results indicate the prominence of GHRM practices toward enhancing hotels’ EP. The authors also found green culture and environmental responsibility as potential mediators in the direct association between GHRM and EP. In addition, the findings suggest that the GHRM and environmental association can be deeper when individuals exhibit green values and showcase green responsibility about their environment. Taken together, the findings of the present study found support for all direct and indirect hypothesized relationships hence, forwarding notable implications for theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper forwards both theoretical and practical implications. Drawing upon ability-motivation-opportunity (AMO) theory, this paper asserts that GHRM practices shall be used to improve EP through green values and environmental responsibility. The authors specifically suggest that pro-environment personnel practices can nourish green culture and a pro-environment sense of responsibility that facilitates in robust pro-environment results.

Originality/value

The study advances and addresses gaps found in prior studies to help support organizational scholars, practitioners and pro-environment enthusiasts to understand the interplay of GHRM, culture, responsibility and EP.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Amna Yousaf, Razia Shaukat and Waheed Ali Umrani

This study aims to build on the existing research regarding workplace conflict by arguing that task conflict (TC) leads to resource gains for individuals with non-routine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to build on the existing research regarding workplace conflict by arguing that task conflict (TC) leads to resource gains for individuals with non-routine technical jobs, which increases individuals’ work engagement (WE) and leads to positive individual-level outcomes. Specifically, this study uses a resource investment/acquisition approach with the aim of offering insight into the consequences of group-level TC on individual-level outcomes, including task performance (TP), contextual performance and turnover intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-rater data was collected from 508 telecom engineers and 35 supervisors working in Pakistan’s telecom sector. The engineers were divided into 31 teams and the data were analysed using confirmatory factor analyses and structural equation modelling to test the interrelationships among study constructs.

Findings

As expected, TC was positively correlated with both TP and contextual performance, while it was negatively correlated with turnover intention; these relationships were mediated by WE. The results reveal that TC in technical jobs leads to resource gains and, through WE, facilitates task and contextual performances at the individual level. Similarly, TC mitigates individual-level turnover intention through the mediation of WE.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the literature on the conflict by delineating a resource investment/acquisition process within the conservation of resources theory, whereby TC (an exchange and acquisition of cognitive resources) leads to resource investment (in the form of WE), which, in turn, leads to positive individual-level outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Huadong Yang and Amna Yousaf

In this paper, the authors examine the role of idiocentric and allocentric cultural orientations in employees’ preference for relationship help and for emotional help from…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors examine the role of idiocentric and allocentric cultural orientations in employees’ preference for relationship help and for emotional help from third parties in two cross-cultural samples. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the psychological dynamics of cultural dimensions in relation to cross-cultural conflict intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the theoretical assumptions by using questionnaire survey in two cross-cultural samples. Study 1 is a cross-cultural comparison within a country, including 83 Dutch employees and 106 Turkish immigrants in the Netherlands. Study 2 is a comparison between countries, including 123 Germany-based German employees and 101 Pakistan-based Pakistani employees.

Findings

The results show that employees’ allocentric orientation, but not idiocentric orientation, explains the differences in preference for relationship help in both the within-country comparison (Study 1: individualistic Dutch culture vs collectivistic Turkish culture) and the between-country comparison (Study 2: individualistic German culture vs collectivistic Pakistani culture). However, only in the between-country comparison (Study 2), the findings reveal that the difference in preference for emotional help between individualistic German culture and collectivistic Pakistani culture is mediated by idiocentric orientation (not by allocentric orientation).

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms that the extent to which disputants’ preference for third-party help regarding social and personal aspects does differ across national cultures, and supports that the argument that social relationship is one of the paramount concerns in conflict handling in the collectivistic cultures. In addition, the study signals an alternative way of conducting two culture comparisons and expands our view on the cultural dimension of individualism-collectivism.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications both for third-party intervention and for managing cultural diversity in the workplace.

Social implications

In general, this study contributes to our understanding on how culture influences conflict handling and provides suggestions for third parties to be culturally adaptive.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that culture plays an important role in determining the extent to which disputants favour relationship help and emotional help from third parties. The research is also valuable in terms of reliability. The authors tested the hypotheses in two cross-cultural samples both within a country and between countries.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Fatima Yusuf and Amna Yousaf

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if market discipline and legal environment are sufficient to motivate firms to disclose optimal level of corporate information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if market discipline and legal environment are sufficient to motivate firms to disclose optimal level of corporate information voluntarily in the context of a developing country that is Pakistan. Furthermore, it was examined if regulators have sufficient regulatory capacity to influence the extent up to which politically connected companies disclose corporate information.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth investigation was carried out through qualitative content analysis of 200 annual reports from 40 companies listed on Karachi Stock Exchange along with 26 semi-structured interviews from experts in the field of corporate governance.

Findings

Findings from the research indicated that there is an absence of culture for disclosure of information and country’s existing institutional environment is not sufficiently strong to support self-regulation or voluntary disclosure of information. It is argued that stringent disclosure regulation results in better flow of information in politically connected companies and helps in curbing opportunistic behaviour.

Practical implications

This research carries significant policy implications. It is proposed that in addition to mandatory disclosure requirements, the code of corporate governance should indicate desirable disclosure levels for voluntary corporate information as well.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the effectiveness of role and usefulness of mandatory corporate disclosure regulation, voluntary disclosure practices, and capacity of regulators to enhance dissemination of corporate information in a developing country with high levels of political corruption and cronyism through an in-depth research.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Amna Yousaf, Huadong Yang and Karin Sanders

The purpose of this paper is to examine underlying linkages between employees’ intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and their task/contextual performance in a Pakistani health…

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6715

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine underlying linkages between employees’ intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and their task/contextual performance in a Pakistani health care and educational context. Employees’ affective occupational and organizational commitments were proposed as mediators to explain these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 181 doctors from a Pakistani hospital and 135 academics from a Pakistani university and analyzed using Baron and Kenney (1986) approach and Preacher and Hayes (2008) bootstrapping approach for testing multiple mediators simultaneously.

Findings

As expected, intrinsic motivation is related to task performance (TP) and this relationship is mediated by affective occupational commitment. Extrinsic motivation is related both to TP and contextual performance (CP) and these relationships are mediated by affective organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Research has implications both for practitioners and academicians. The results highlight how different motivational orientations can produce different results and managers need to understand the different needs of employees while devising their human resource strategies. Employees can differ in their motivational orientations depending on their level of need, and can accordingly differ in their subsequent attitudes, performance and behaviors. Employees also need to choose jobs carefully after evaluating their motivational orientations.

Originality/value

The current study recognizes the multi-dimensional nature of motivation and differentiates the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivational orientations of employees by establishing the unique linkages between these orientations and employee task and CP. The study also examines differential role of two foci of employee commitment in analyzing the main effects.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Amna Yousaf, Karin Sanders and Qaisar Abbas

The purpose of this paper is to draw meaningful relationship between two foci of commitment (i.e. affective organizational and affective occupational) and two types of…

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3187

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw meaningful relationship between two foci of commitment (i.e. affective organizational and affective occupational) and two types of turnover intentions (i.e. organizational and occupational turnover intention).

Design/methodology/approach

Using random sampling approach, the authors collected data from both academic and support staff of a Dutch university. An online questionnaire was developed and sent through electronic mail to 752 of the total employees. A total of 153 employees responded; yielding approximately 21 percent response rate.

Findings

The results revealed that affective organizational commitment and affective occupational commitment were positively related to each other. Affective organizational commitment was negatively related to organizational turnover intention and this relationship was buffered by affective occupational commitment. Affective occupational commitment was negatively related both to occupational and organizational turnover intention. Last study hypothesis, however, could not gain support as affective organizational commitment did not moderate the affective occupational commitment-occupational turnover intention relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed in the end.

Originality/value

The study poses some valuable contributions to the existing body of literature by exhibiting the role affective occupational commitment in the models of organizational turnover intention and that of affective organizational commitment in occupational turnover intention models which has been over looked so far.

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Razia Sultana, Amna Yousaf, Iram Khan and Abubakr Saeed

The purpose of this paper is to find out the moderating role of emotional intelligence (EI) in the relationship between career commitment and career success of the bank…

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2121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the moderating role of emotional intelligence (EI) in the relationship between career commitment and career success of the bank employees working in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used ex post facto method where 200 middle-level managerial bank employees were surveyed by means of a close-ended questionnaire. Moderated multiple regression was run to test the hypotheses.

Findings

As expected, the research findings confirmed the expectation of significant relationship between career commitment and objective/subjective career success. Further, the research findings bolstered one of the research postulates that EI will moderate career commitment-objective career success relationship. However the argument of EI’s moderation between career commitment-subjective career success relationship was not supported by the findings.

Originality/value

This paper adds value to the existing body of knowledge by augmenting the need of understanding the distinctiveness of objective and subjective career success. The study unveils the importance of devising separate mechanisms to cater both the objective and subjective career success needs of the employees and enhances the scope of career literature in South Asian settings.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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