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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Jon Christensen and Amit Bandyopadhyay

A novel approach is used to reverse engineer polymeric parts in a low cost, non‐destructive manner. Solids created from polymers with an index of refraction matching that…

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Abstract

A novel approach is used to reverse engineer polymeric parts in a low cost, non‐destructive manner. Solids created from polymers with an index of refraction matching that of an immersion liquid are reverse engineered using a CCD camera. Serial images are taken as the part is immersed into the liquid or taken out of the liquid. The images are then used to create digital solid models from the polymeric physical model. The concept of the process, the hardware as a proof‐of‐concept demonstration, and results to understand the accuracy and limitations of the process are described.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Amit Bandyopadhyay, Kakoli Das, Jeff Marusich and Seyi Onagoruwa

Al‐alumina interconnected phase composites were processed using the direct fused deposition process. These materials with tailored microstructures can find applications as…

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Abstract

Purpose

Al‐alumina interconnected phase composites were processed using the direct fused deposition process. These materials with tailored microstructures can find applications as structural materials with gradient properties.

Design/methodology/approach

In this process, feedstock material with fused silica as a starting material was compounded at a high shear mixer and then extruded as a filament using a single screw extruder. Extruded filaments were used with a commercial fused deposition modeler, FDM 1650, to process controlled porosity green ceramic structures. Porous green ceramic preforms were subjected to binder removal and sintering cycles in furnace air. Controlled porosity sintered ceramic structures were infiltrated with Al 5052 metal by pressureless reactive metal infiltration to form an in situ Al‐alumina structured composite.

Findings

The main advantage for this approach is to control distribution of both metal and ceramic phases in the composite. During metal infiltration good bonding was observed between the metal and the ceramic phases. Composites were tested under both quasi‐static and dynamic shock loading to evaluate their mechanical properties. Compression strength of these composites was 689±95 MPa.

Originality/value

This paper describes application of the direct fused deposition process for fabrication of ceramic/metal composites where both macrostructure as well as microstructure can be controlled simultaneously. The paper also focuses on one of the potential application area for 5052‐Al alloy.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Vamsi Krishna Balla, Luke B. Roberson, Gregory W. O'Connor, Steven Trigwell, Susmita Bose and Amit Bandyopadhyay

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of direct fabrication of lunar/Martian regolith simulant parts, in a freeform environment, using Laser Engineering…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility of direct fabrication of lunar/Martian regolith simulant parts, in a freeform environment, using Laser Engineering Net Shaping (LENS™) – an additive manufacturing technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Bulk lunar regolith simulant structures were fabricated using a LENS™‐750. Dense parts without any macroscopic defects were produced at a laser power of 50W, a scan speed of 20 mm/s, and a powder feed rate of 12.36 g/min. The laser processed parts were characterized using X‐ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscope and X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate the influence of laser processing on the microstructure, constituent phases and chemistry of lunar regolith simulant.

Findings

A combination of laser parameters resulting in a 2.12 J/mm2 laser energy appeared to be ideal for generating a melt pool necessary for lunar regolith powder deposition without excessive liquid pool spreading and cracking of solidified parts. The results show that LENS™ based laser processing transformed crystalline regolith into nanocrystalline and/or amorphous regolith structures as a result of complete melting followed by resolidification. Laser processing also resulted in marginal changes in the composition of the regolith.

Originality/value

Establishment of a lunar/Martian outpost necessitates the development of methods to utilize in situ mineral resources for various construction and resource extraction applications. Fabrication technologies are critical for habitat structure development, as well as repair and replacement of tools and parts at the outpost. Current experimental results presented in the paper clearly demonstrate that net shape regolith simulant parts can be fabricated using LENS™ by exploiting its capabilities.

Case study
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Surajit Ghosh Dastidar

To understand social entrepreneurship and a social entrepreneur; to identify a social problem and develop a business idea; to understand the theory of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

To understand social entrepreneurship and a social entrepreneur; to identify a social problem and develop a business idea; to understand the theory of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition; and to understand microfinance and its impact in the lives of the poor.

Case overview/synopsis

The case traces the journey of its founder Chandra Shekhar Ghosh from being a small time entrepreneur in microfinance to being the owner of a universal bank named Bandhan. Bandhan bank started its operations on August 23, 2015 with 501 branches, 2022 service center and 50 ATMs across 24 states. It had 14.3 million accounts, around 105 billion loan book and 19,500 employees. The founder of Bandhan bank, Chandra Shekhar Ghosh, an Ashoka fellow had won numerous awards such as Entrepreneur with Social Impact Award by Forbes (2014), Entrepreneur of the Year by Economic Times (2014), Skoch Financial Inclusion Award (2011), Entrepreneur of the Year Award (2014) by AIMA to name a few. In 2014, Bandhan was also recognized as Global Growth Company by World Economic Forum.

Complexity academic level

The case is suitable for analysis in a MBA level course on social entrepreneurship.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Palash Kumar Maji, Amit Jyoti Banerjee, Partha Sarathi Banerjee and Sankar Karmakar

The purpose of this paper was development of patient-specific femoral prosthesis using rapid prototyping (RP), a part of additive manufacturing (AM) technology, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was development of patient-specific femoral prosthesis using rapid prototyping (RP), a part of additive manufacturing (AM) technology, and comparison of its merits or demerits over CNC machining route.

Design/methodology/approach

The customized femoral prosthesis was developed through computed tomography (CT)-3D CAD-RP-rapid tooling (RT)-investment casting (IC) route using a stereolithography apparatus (SLA-250) RP machine. A similar prosthesis was also developed through conventional CT-CAD-CAM-CNC, using RP models to check the fit before machining. The dimensional accuracy, surface finish, cost and time involvement were compared between these two routes.

Findings

In both the routes, RP had an important role in checking the fit. Through the conventional machining route, higher-dimensional accuracies and surface finish were achieved. On the contrary, RP route involved lesser time and cost, with rougher surface finish on the prosthesis surface and less internal shrinkage porosity. The rougher surface finish of the prosthesis is favourable for bone ingrowths after implantation and porosity reduce the effective stiffness of the prosthesis, leading to reduced stress shielding effect after implantation.

Research limitations/implications

As there is no AM machine for direct fabrication of metallic component like laser engineered net shaping and electron beam melting in our Institute, the metallic prosthesis was developed through RP-RT-IC route using the SLA-250 machine.

Practical implications

The patient-specific prosthesis always provides better fit and favourable stress distribution, leading to longer life of the prosthesis. The described RP route can be followed to develop the customized prosthesis at lower price within the shortest time.

Originality/value

The described methodology of customized prosthesis development through the AM route and its advantages are applicable for development of any metallic prostheses.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Anat Rafaeli, Galit Bracha Yom Tov, Shelly Ashtar and Daniel Altman

Purpose: To outline recent developments in digital service delivery in order to encourage researchers to pursue collaborations with computer science, operations research…

Abstract

Purpose: To outline recent developments in digital service delivery in order to encourage researchers to pursue collaborations with computer science, operations research, and data science colleagues and to show how such collaborations can expand the scope of research on emotion in service delivery.

Design/methodology/approach: Uses archived resources available at http://LivePerson.com to extract data based in genuine service conversations between agents and customers. We refer to these as “digital traces” and analyze them using computational science models.

Findings: Although we do not test significance or causality, the data presented in this chapter provide a unique lens into the dynamics of emotions in service; results that are not obtainable using traditional research methods.

Research limitations/implications: This is a descriptive study where findings unravel new dynamics that should be followed up with more research, both research using traditional experimental methods, and digital traces research that allows inferences of causality.

Practical implications: The digital data and newly developed tools for sentiment analyses allow exploration of emotions in large samples of genuine customer service interactions. The research provides objective, unobtrusive views of customer emotions that draw directly from customer expressions, with no self-report intervention and biases.

Originality/value: This is the first objective and detailed depiction of the actual emotional encounters that customers express, and the first to analyze in detail the nature and content of customer service work.

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Gunjan M. Sanjeev, Kanika Gupta and Rumki Bandyopadhyay

The purpose of this paper is to provide a practitioners' perspective on financial challenges prevalent in the Indian hospitality industry. The paper also makes an attempt…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a practitioners' perspective on financial challenges prevalent in the Indian hospitality industry. The paper also makes an attempt to give useful insights into possible solutions to the issues raised.

Design/methodology/approach

The study assimilates data from senior finance professionals from a spectrum of hotels in India. The study involves the collection of primary data through structured interviews.

Findings

The study highlights that some of the financial challenges faced by the Indian hospitality industry include high financing costs, multiplicity of taxes charged, licensing and legal issues, working capital issues and eroding margins. The study also gives some useful insights to the possible solutions to the challenges identified.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides some very useful qualitative analysis of the contemporary challenges and their possible solutions prevalent in the Indian hospitality sector. The findings will be useful for hoteliers, policy makers and researchers to deliberate on the issues raised. However, it does not involve any quantitative analysis.

Originality/value

This study makes a sincere attempt to bring forth some real life issues, challenges and solutions which would be a good value addition to the existing literature.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2017

Anandajit Goswami, Kaushik Ranjan Bandyopadhyay and Atul Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic growth, a large share of rural households still rely on firewood for cooking which not only has serious repercussions of increasing indoor pollution but also has a concomitant adverse effect on women and child morbidity and mortality. However, transition to clean energy options like improved cookstoves for these households may not be necessarily linear. It is often driven or resisted by latent factors such as caste, trust, social capital, information flow, social positioning of clusters that are deeply embedded in the social and cultural norms and values specific to local rural contexts. This has been shown in the present case study that pertains to eight villages in the remote and deprived Purnea district of Bihar and the need for internalizing them in the macro energy policymaking has been established in the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a macro foundation research that is complemented by micro foundation tools of fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model framework to achieve the purpose of the study. Focused-group discussions and interviews are also conducted to establish the narrative of the paper.

Findings

Caste, socio-political position, asset structure, remoteness, culture and technology access affect rural households’ decision making capability that is related to shifting from using the traditionalmeans of firewood and biomass based traditional cookstoves for cooking to adopting improved clean cooking stoves which will enable the transition toward the use of clean rural energy in the eight villages in Bihar chosen for this study.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the paper have larger implications for the broader macro energy policymaking in the country by taking into account the non-linear, latent factors of village contexts.

Practical implications

The research will help energy policymakers in decision-making and will guide the implementation process of national- and state-level policies on rural energy transition in India.

Social implications

The findings of the paper will help the smoother implementation of national- and state-level rural energy transition policies for cooking, creating developmental dividends for rural Indian households.

Originality/value

The research is new with regard to the application of non-deterministic fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model approach to contribute to the country’s national- and state-level rural energy transition policies.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Lara Schilling and Stefan Seuring

While the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on logistics and supply chain management (SCM) is recently much discussed, this is hardly linked to…

Abstract

Purpose

While the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on logistics and supply chain management (SCM) is recently much discussed, this is hardly linked to emerging economies and base of the pyramid (BoP) settings. The paper aims as offering a framework linking different conceptual elements to each other for explaining how ICT enables sustainable value creation in emerging economy supply chains (SCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on conceptual reasoning linking constructs from the different fields to each other.

Findings

Using conceptual reasoning linking constructs, six elements are identified: (1) SC flows, (2) BoP challenges and (3) ICT services as starting points, and environmental conditions driving sustainable value creation. The application of ICT within BoP SC operations drives the process of sustainable value creation by enabling new ways of (4) electronic business (e-business) transactions and (5) SSCM behaviors. This leads to (6) sustainable value for businesses using ICT applications and their respective stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical testing by collecting field data in emerging economy contexts would be demanded to address the limitation of building on conceptual reasonings.

Practical implications

The framework provides various SC-related measures driving e-business value creation for managers of businesses, charity organizations and policymakers in emerging communities.

Social implications

Understanding the use of smartphones and other mobile devices for businesses and their supply chains in emerging markets would have wide ranging social implication addressed in the sustainable value creation of the framework offered.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework brings different elements together offering insights into ICT applications in BoP SCs. Linking SCM, ICT and BoP to each other is a novel contribution having wider implications for the future development of emerging economies.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Mansi Rastogi, Rupashree Baral and Jasmine Banu

This paper aims to provide relevant knowledge about entrepreneurship and women’s leadership in the Indian context. More specifically, it unleashes the veiled challenges as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide relevant knowledge about entrepreneurship and women’s leadership in the Indian context. More specifically, it unleashes the veiled challenges as well as success stories of select women entrepreneurs of a developing country to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship theory and practice. It aims to provide directions to the policymakers, educationists, society and families in creating a conducive environment that is essential for the success of women entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

With a qualitative case study approach, data were collected from Tamil Nadu, a southern Indian state which has a maximum number of women entrepreneurs. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to explore the supportive as well as challenging dimensions of their entrepreneurial journey.

Findings

Content analysis of the interview transcripts indicated that successful entrepreneurs are opportunity-driven and they focus on innovation, service, generation of wealth and employment. Support from family, especially from fathers or husbands, is as important as the entrepreneurial drive, skills and abilities of an entrepreneur. Success for them is being happy, thriving work, having a happy family, having a great work-life balance and the satisfaction to have served society apart from being independent (economically/ financially). Among India’s societal and cultural realities, women have to conquer many hurdles (both implicit and explicit) in their way concerning the societal attitudes toward women stepping out of the home boundaries and traditional gender role expectations. The silver line is societal attitudes are changing, especially in urban India. There are enough support and encouragement from the family, which helps these women pursue their passion and eventually become a successful leader.

Social implications

The success stories of women will bring a wave of positive developmental change in India by fostering respect for women in a male-dominated society and flashing the importance of women’s entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new examination of women entrepreneurs that significantly further the debate about the underrepresentation of women in leadership roles, especially in entrepreneurship in an emerging economy context like India. Apart from the deterrents, it aims to highlight the enablers and motivations to choose this unconventional profession.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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