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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Amiram Porath

Evolution has long been a biological process “borrowed” by management sciences to define structural and procedural development in organizations. The theory of Darwinian Evolution…

1187

Abstract

Evolution has long been a biological process “borrowed” by management sciences to define structural and procedural development in organizations. The theory of Darwinian Evolution in biology has existed for a long time and still (with modification) remains the main theory in life sciences. However in biotechnology new concepts have risen. In parallel, organization sciences have been evolving the concept of evolution on different levels of the organization, discussing the evolution of organization during their life cycle, the evolution of populations of organizations, sectors, etc. Directed evolution in biology creates new organisms that can produce molecules with attributes better fitting industrial use, from naturally occurring organisms, allowing new organisms to function in non‐biological environments and perform processes they never needed to perform in a natural environment. We will show that by translating the concept from biology into organization sciences, we can develop the techniques for the evolution of new organizational structures and fitting routines, that would fit new emerging environments, where we seek the best adapted routines and structures for performance. We will adopt the concept of directly evolving a structure fitting for pre‐designed purposes by using bio‐technology methods, and will try and bridge the gap in organization sciences between the current development of the evolutionary theory and the advance made in biology. At the end discusses opportunities for research (the European Framework Program, national programs), together with a proposed general plan of action. The theory and the techniques descried can lead to further research and active experimentation.

Details

Foresight, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Amiram Porath

The purpose is to better understand the way legal mechanisms follow up and support or repress economic growth

534

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to better understand the way legal mechanisms follow up and support or repress economic growth

Design/methodology/approach

The case of the Israeli R&D Law is presented, and the development of the law is compared to changes in the environment

Findings

The findings show that the legal aspect of economic support laws is significant and that better adaptation to the environment is required.

Practical implications

Areas / countries seeking to enact laws regarding economic growth and R&D support should analyze this example and draw conclusions for their law formulation systems.

Originality/value

This paper is a case study article showing the example of a well documented impact of the legal system on economic growth, and how changes in the environment should be translated without delay, or with minimum delay into the legal framework. It could help policy makers and legal decision makers better understand the impact of such laws.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Zeev Rosenhek

Explains the development of Israel’s welfare state, concentrating on the labour exchange system and housing. Links the development of the Zionist welfare state to economic and…

Abstract

Explains the development of Israel’s welfare state, concentrating on the labour exchange system and housing. Links the development of the Zionist welfare state to economic and political conditions, in particular state‐building and the management of the Palestinian community within the state. Refers to literature on policy paradigms. Notes the stable institutional infrastructures developed by the Jewish community in Palestine and the Zionist labour movement, which led to an embryonic welfare state. Recounts the development of the labour exchange process and the public housing policy, describing how the policies reinforced statehood – settling immigrants into areas where Jewish presence needed strengthening and, at first, largely excluding the Palestinian community from access to housing and the labour process. Points out that, over time, the exclusion of Palestinians became unrealistic. Concludes that Israel’s welfare state was determined by political conditions of developing statehood – most importantly the exodus of Palestinians and the influx of Jewish immigrants.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 18 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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