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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Isabelle Vandangeon-Derumez, Amina Djedidi and Eila Szendy

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of experience in learning about, and preparing for, change management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the role of experience in learning about, and preparing for, change management.

Design/methodology/approach

A course with a different approach to teaching about change management has been proposed to learners. It uses drawing, simulation and exploration of case studies. Learners wrote reports on change management before and after the course and these reports were then thematically analyzed.

Findings

Results show the specific ways in which the course places learners in a position to: experience change, use their collective experiences, acquire and develop practical knowledge, and prepare themselves for change. Capitalizing on such experiences of change could arguably become an integral part of an organization’s “readiness to change” strategy.

Research limitations/implications

It would be useful to further investigate what happens after this experience by interviewing learners, later on, in order to analyze how they subsequently use, in a real professional environment, such knowledge and skills acquired during the learning process.

Practical implications

Using this approach, future managers are arguably better prepared to implement change. Capitalizing on such experiences of change could become part of an organization’s “readiness for change” strategy.

Social implications

The benefits of experiencing change management in a learning environment will only be reaped when firms allocate time and space to such experiential learning. This entails going beyond managing this change to a deeper perspective by identifying key elements to maintain and/or enhance one’s experience of managing change.

Originality/value

The value of the present paper lies in individual and collective experience as a key element to prepare managers to change management.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Ouidade Sabri, Amina Djedidi and Mouhoub Hani

This study aims to examine the critical role of types of coopetition (upstream/downstream), market structure (concentrated/competitive) and innovation (low vs high degree…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the critical role of types of coopetition (upstream/downstream), market structure (concentrated/competitive) and innovation (low vs high degree of innovation) that can affect the way consumers perceive the resulting price (un)fairness of new offerings.

Design/methodology/approach

Three between-subjects experiments involving different participant populations and product categories were conducted to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The valence of the effect of types of coopetition (upstream/downstream) on price fairness is conditional on the market structure and the degree of innovation associated with the new product offering. Downstream (as opposed to upstream) coopetition is much more detrimental to perceptions of price fairness in a concentrated market than in a competitive and fragmented market. However, within a competitive market, downstream coopetition may lead to greater price fairness perception than upstream coopetition when the new product offering is highly innovative.

Research limitations/implications

The current study uses lab experiments with fictitious scenarios and focuses on two moderating variables: market structure and innovation perceptions. Future research may use field experiments and explore additional moderating variables that may annihilate the negative effect of downstream coopetition on price fairness perception, especially in a concentrated market.

Practical implications

In concentrated markets, firms should opt for upstream rather than downstream coopetition to limit the negative effect the announcement of coopetition has on price fairness evaluation. However, within a competitive market, when the new product offering resulting from coopetition is associated with a high perceived degree of innovation, firms should opt for downstream rather than upstream coopetition because of its positive impact on price fairness evaluation.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that new product development from coopetition has important implications for the perception of price fairness, leading to positive or negative effects depending on market structure and the degree of innovation of the new product offering. It then explores the conditions under which types of coopetition (upstream/downstream) might backfire.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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