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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Tom Schultheiss, Lorraine Hartline, Jean Mandeberg, Pam Petrich and Sue Stern

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2012

Megumi Hosoda, Lam T. Nguyen and Eugene F. Stone‐Romero

Despite the fact that Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing segment of the population and that 44 percent of Hispanics of 18 years of age and older speak English

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the fact that Hispanics are the largest and fastest growing segment of the population and that 44 percent of Hispanics of 18 years of age and older speak English less than very well, research examining the impact of Spanish‐accented English on employment‐related decisions has been scarce. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the effects of the accent (standard American English and Mexican Spanish) of a hypothetical job applicant on employment‐related judgments and hiring decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants made employment‐related decisions (i.e. job suitability ratings, likelihood of a promotion, and hiring decision) and judgments of personal attributes (i.e. perceived competence and warmth) of a hypothetical applicant for an entry‐level software engineering job. The accent of the applicant was manipulated using the matched‐guise technique.

Findings

Results showed that compared to an applicant with a standard AmericanEnglish accent, one with a Mexican‐Spanish accent was at a disadvantage when applying for the software engineering job. The Mexican‐Spanish‐accented applicant was rated as less suitable for the job and viewed as less likely to be promoted to a managerial position. In addition, fewer participants decided to hire the Mexican‐Spanish‐accented applicant than the standard American English‐accented applicant.

Practical implications

Given the negative evaluations of the Mexican‐Spanish‐accented applicant, recruiters and interviewers should be selected who do not view foreign accents negatively. Furthermore, organizations should make a conscious effort to regard foreign accents as assets to their businesses.

Originality/value

This research contributes to our understanding of how foreign accents influence decisions that have important economic consequences for individuals.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Tom Schultheiss

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

James Rettig

Reference librarians, especially those in academic libraries, must frequently give formal or informal instruction in how to locate secondary materials for research in…

Abstract

Reference librarians, especially those in academic libraries, must frequently give formal or informal instruction in how to locate secondary materials for research in English and American literature. Most librarians teach their patrons how to use the MLA International Bibliography. Those who can engage their patrons' interest and attention long enough take the opportunity to introduce them to one or more bibliographic guides for the study of English and American literature. Yet this opportunity creates problems for the librarian since there are so many bibliographic guides to choose among. Some are annotated, some not; some cover both national literatures, some only one; some are intended for graduate students and scholars, some for undergraduates. Faced with this predicament, many librarians have come to rely on one broad guide for all purposes and patrons and let other guides gather dust on the shelves.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Elena Tosky King and Lakia M. Scott

This paper aims to progress the dialogue on language rights in the urban classroom. Research has evidenced how language can serve as a powerful tool in mainstream…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to progress the dialogue on language rights in the urban classroom. Research has evidenced how language can serve as a powerful tool in mainstream ideologies; more specifically, the preferred and dominant use of Standard Written English in the American classroom has demonstrated how language serves as a gatekeeper for student success. This paper calls for a more democratic notion of language usage that denies the “gatekeeper” of English into specific educational tracks.

Design/methodology/approach

By framing the issue of linguistic diversity through a theoretical analysis of cultural reproduction theory, this paper demonstrates how language serves as a bridge in building and negotiating cultural identities for students. In addition, an examination of how language serves as a stratification tool in educational contexts provides credence for reform initiatives.

Findings

In the field of linguistics, the shift in verbal and language repertoires has provided a new paradigm for rethinking what constitutes as an acceptable and innovative language use. However, structures such as schools have remained static in their vision of linguistic success in the classroom, assessing students’ language abilities in the specifics of standard written English.

Originality/value

This analysis encourages recommendations for examining current curriculum with regards to the promotion of language diversity, encouragement for teachers to reexamine their individual perceptions about language difference and the realignment of assessment and academic measurement tools to better accommodate students with linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Ernest Raiklin

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (whiteand black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in oneclothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal”…

Abstract

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (white and black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in one clothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal” negative, when one race considers another race inferior to itself in degree, but not in nature; (2) “Maximal” negative, when one race regards another as inherently inferior; (3) “Minimal” positive, when one race elevates another race to a superior status in degree, but not in nature; and (4) “Maximal” positive, when one race believes that the other race is genetically superior. The monograph maintains that the needs of capitalism created black slavery; that black slavery produced white racism as a justification for black slavery; and that black racism is a backlash of white racism. The monograph concludes that the abolition of black slavery and the civil rights movement destroyed the social and political ground for white and black racism, while the modern development of capitalism is demolishing their economic and intellectual ground.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Juan G. Rosado

This chapter highlights the social and cultural gaps evidenced when students from a foreign country receive education in a Puerto Rican university. It explores the…

Abstract

This chapter highlights the social and cultural gaps evidenced when students from a foreign country receive education in a Puerto Rican university. It explores the influence and the implications of the Spanish vernacular being used as a language of instruction. The chapter starts with a historical background on English language instruction for Puerto Ricans throughout the last century. This topic is discussed in order to shed light on the consequences of such a polemic subject and to evaluate the implications and the influence it has had in the way Puerto Ricans communicate. The Puerto Rican Spanish vernacular is inherent in the language of instruction used throughout grade school and in Higher Education. As part of the investigation of the effects of the language of instruction, three students were interviewed to form part of this discourse. The motivations they had to study on the island were explored, as well as experiences that highlighted the language and cultural barriers that may or may not have been present in while studying in a Puerto Rican university. Their feelings toward their general experiences with their peers and professors were also explored.

Details

Contexts for Diversity and Gender Identities in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Equity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-056-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2010

Dike Okoro

This brings us to the question of the extent of the problem and how it might be alleviated. Well, because it is widely accepted that those who live in glasshouses should…

Abstract

This brings us to the question of the extent of the problem and how it might be alleviated. Well, because it is widely accepted that those who live in glasshouses should not throw stones, I shall be careful with my analysis of the problems associated with mastering English. In addition to English, I speak five languages. The adjustments I make on a daily basis to retain fluency in these non-English languages are quite tedious. Nevertheless, I have learnt to use these languages for situational purposes. I suppose students desiring to master English ought to do the opposite when it comes to embracing English and mastering its component. Should they choose to do so, they stand a good chance of reaping the benefits of mastering English in the United States or globally. Statistics and documented evidence shows that US immigrants who devote time and space to mastering English stand a good chance of enhancing their education and securing employment (see Miller & Ward, 2005). This is true because the United States is not yet a bilingual nation. Furthermore, documented evidence shows teachers in most American schools are working hard at implementing new approaches and methods that will help immigrant children and students in schools to succeed (see Ramakrishan, 2002). This is a positive sign for education in the United States. English is the language of commerce and the language that is used to educate the world when literature is disseminated at major international circuits and business transactions. As such, it is important that we make its usage and mastery a pivotal part of the education immigrant students receive irrespective of ethnic background. To provide key factors for my reasons, I will reference critical points made by teachers, politicians, writers, lawmakers, and educators concerning the mastery of English and the immigrant population in the United States. Much as I am interested in explaining why and how the mastery of English will help to enhance education for non-English-speaking immigrants, I am also interested in explaining why they need to master English.

Details

Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Research, Technology, and Teacher Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-955-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Tom Schultheiss and Linda Mark

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books, and is designed to supplement the RSR review column, “Recent Reference Books,” by Frances Neel Cheney. “Reference Books in Print” includes all additional books received prior to the inclusion deadline established for this issue. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published, for immediate listing in “Reference Books in Print.” Reference books with imprints older than two years will not be included (with the exception of current reprints or older books newly acquired for distribution by another publisher). The column shall also occasionally include library science or other library related publications of other than a reference character.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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