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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Duaa Al Maani, Saba Alnusairat and Amer Al-Jokhadar

This study explored the virtual design studio as a transformative learning model for the disaster and resilience context, including the factors that affect students'…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the virtual design studio as a transformative learning model for the disaster and resilience context, including the factors that affect students' perceptions and experiences of the quality of this adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from 248 students who took online design studios during the lockdown in 15 universities in Jordan highlight many factors that make the experience of the online design studio more challenging. Despite these challenges, strongly positive aspects of the online studio were evident and widely discussed.

Findings

A model of a hyper-flexible design studio in which students can have a direct contact with their instructor when needed – in addition to online activities, reviews and written feedback – is highly recommended for the beginner years. This HyFlex model will enrich students' learning and understanding of the fundamentals of design and ensure that technology solutions deliver significant and sustainable benefits.

Originality/value

For students, studying architecture necessitates a fundamental shift in the learning mode and attitude in the transition from school. Beginner students are often surprised by the new mode of learning-by-doing and the new learner identity that they must adopt and adapt to in the design studio. Moreover, due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, architecture teaching has moved online. Both instructors and students are experiencing dramatic changes in their modes of teaching and learning due to the sudden move from on-campus design studios to a virtual alternative, with only the bare minimum of resources and relevant experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Saba Alnusairat, Duaa Al Maani and Amer Al-Jokhadar

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of students in higher educational institutions in Jordan towards the use of online design studios during coronavirus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of students in higher educational institutions in Jordan towards the use of online design studios during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown and discusses how their use could enhance the learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

615 undergraduate students studying architecture in Jordanian universities were recruited to explore the factors that constituted and affected their perceptions of online design studios.

Findings

The findings of this study highlight that many of the participants felt uncertain about aspects of their online learning experience and wanted more guidance and support. Reasons of this disengagement include technical factors, such as poor network quality and lack of familiarity with the new applications. Students and tutors' personal situations when working and studying from home are also relevant due to the tutors' lack of expertise in online teaching, and the limitations of peer interaction. Together, these factors can make the experience of the online design studio more challenging.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was nationally representative of architecture students from various institutions. However, the study was limited to an exploration of students' opinions, and it did not include the points of view of tutors and decision-makers.

Originality/value

This research was conceived during the period of the COVID-19 lockdown, whilst both tutors and students were experiencing dramatic changes in their modes of teaching and learning due to the sudden move from on-campus design studios to a virtual alternative, with only the bare minimum of resources and relevant experience. Learners' perspectives can enhance understanding of online design studios to assess their quality and effectiveness.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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