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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Miyoung Jeong and Marketa Kubickova

Creating memorable experiences for customers at the individual property is one of the primary goals in hotel management across all segments. Adopting the concept of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Creating memorable experiences for customers at the individual property is one of the primary goals in hotel management across all segments. Adopting the concept of the ingredient branding, this study aims to attempt to identify the effects of bathroom amenity brands on customers' attitudes toward the hotel brand image and their behavior intentions toward a hotel brand. Specifically, this study assesses the importance of bathroom amenities on customer experience. It also examines the effects of bathroom amenity and their sustainable practices on hotel brand image and behavior intentions. Lastly, it provides suggestions for hoteliers in selecting right and appealing bathroom amenities while enhancing customers' hotel experience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a 3 (hotel service level: economy, midscale, vs luxury) × 2 (bathroom amenity brand: luxury vs general) × 2 (bathroom amenity packaging: bottle vs dispenser) between-subjects experimental design. A total of 557 useable surveys were obtained to test the study's hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that customers had a better hotel image when high-end brand bathroom amenities in a bottle were offered. Specifically, when economy hotels provided high-end brand bathroom amenities, customers had a better hotel image, which lead to strong return intentions. Typically, bathroom amenities in the bottle were perceived better than those in the dispenser when it came to the hotel image.

Practical implications

The findings of this study reconfirm that the level of hotel service, bathroom amenity brand and bathroom amenity packaging jointly affect hotels' overall image. Specifically, the generic bathroom amenity in the dispenser somewhat degrades the image of the hotel for economy hotels; however, the image of hotel is not significantly affected by the type of bathroom packaging when the hotel has luxury bathroom amenities. Thus, hotel management should pay more attention to selecting the bathroom amenity brand, which can offer more memorable experience for customers.

Originality/value

Little research has been documented on the effects of hotel bathroom amenity brands on customers' attitudes toward hotel brand image and their psychological behaviors in the hotel industry, lacking rigorous theoretical examinations. The current study provides several important contributions not only to the body of knowledge but to the hotel industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Deniz Kucukusta

This research aims to investigate how Chinese leisure travelers value hotel amenities when they book hotel rooms in Hong Kong.

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3516

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate how Chinese leisure travelers value hotel amenities when they book hotel rooms in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method was based on a conjoint analysis approach. Conjoint models were developed to determine how people make decisions and what they really value in products or services.

Findings

Price had the highest average importance value, followed by airport/local area shuttles, wireless internet, breakfast and quality of coffee/tea. Price, airport/local area shuttles and wireless internet were rated as being relatively more important than breakfast and quality of coffee/tea.

Research limitations/implications

This research has some limitations in terms of the generalizability of its findings to all hotels and travelers. First, only four hotel amenities were considered. Second, the research focused on Chinese leisure travelers staying in hotels in Hong Kong. Finally, the sample only consisted of leisure travelers.

Practical implications

This research shows that providing complimentary breakfast and free access to quality coffee/tea when a hotel already provides a shuttle service and free wireless internet does not add much value to the overall hotel product from the customer’s point of view. Moreover, it provides insights into how hotel professionals can customize and select the amenities they provide to impress their customers.

Originality/value

This research has significant implications for hotel managers’ efforts to formulate and implement strategies or tactics in their daily operations or long-term plans through the selection of hotel amenities.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Jen‐te Yang

The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of a blue ocean strategy (BOS) in selected hotels in Taiwan.

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8340

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the characteristics of a blue ocean strategy (BOS) in selected hotels in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews and the grounded theory approach were applied in this study. A total of 32 senior and top managers working in the corporate executive office and the divisions of rooms and marketing were selected from international tourist chain hotels and resorts for semi‐structured interviews.

Findings

The results show that the features of BOS are identifying guest value perceptions, innovating distinctive added‐value offerings, developing new market segments, branding and re‐branding, creating a unique hotel ambience, adjusting distribution channels, and establishing strategic alliances.

Practical implications

The study suggests that in the sampled hotels, hoteliers should integrate a demand‐based pricing strategy with a supply‐based product‐development strategy. Organizational effectiveness could be further advanced in those hotels by the introduction of revenue management based on the determination of variations in guest demand, making it possible to offer different pricing strategies to diverse market segments.

Originality/value

The results show that the sampled hotels should be able to create unique products and services for customers that strengthen their competitive positions in the marketplace of international tourist hotels in Taiwan. This study advances academic knowledge in the field of organizational effectiveness, particularly with respect to managing customer demand and capacity in the hotel industry.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Catheryn Khoo-Lattimore and Girish Prayag

This paper aims to examine the relationship between self-image of women travelers, accommodation preferences and the post-consumption behaviors of satisfaction and loyalty.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between self-image of women travelers, accommodation preferences and the post-consumption behaviors of satisfaction and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Accommodation preferences were measured using multi-items adapted from the literature and multi-phases of qualitative research. Female guests recruited from a resort’s membership database in Malaysia resulted in 540 useable surveys. Data were analyzed using both exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Structural equation modeling was used to identify relationships between the various dimensions of accommodation preferences, self-image, satisfaction and loyalty.

Findings

A significant negative relationship was found between women actual self-image and the dimension of hotel activities. Several significant positive relationships were found between women ideal self-image and various room amenities factors. A significant relationship was also found between overall satisfaction and loyalty of guests.

Practical implications

The results provide hoteliers with significant insights into women’s accommodation preferences and identify opportunities for the packaging of accommodation attributes as well as promotion of hotel amenities that would appeal to the girlfriend getaway market.

Originality/value

This study is the first to evaluate significant relationships between self-image and accommodation preferences of women travelers from the girlfriend getaway market in Malaysia.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Jen Chun Wang, Yi-Chieh Wang and Yang-Fei Tai

The purpose of this paper is to study the components and service standards of delightful service by conducting a comprehensive literature review and applying the Delphi…

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2792

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the components and service standards of delightful service by conducting a comprehensive literature review and applying the Delphi survey method.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a three-round Delphi survey to consolidate the experience of 11 experts in implementing delightful service. To ensure the recruitment of experts who were knowledgeable in delightful service delivery, the panellists were chosen from service- and hospitality-related industries; the respondents were hotel managers, senior frontline service personnel and academic educators who were knowledgeable in both the service industry and service innovation.

Findings

By integrating professional experiences from both academics and hotel practitioners, we conclude that hotel facilities and amenities, environment and ambiance design and service personnel’s service delivery practices are essential elements for creating a unique and unforgettable consumer experience. Distinctive hotel facilities and ambiance provide a unique experience, which can leave memorable impressions on customers. Being able to detect customers’ emotional conditions and hidden needs through attentive and proactive service practice and providing attentive and customized service are pivotal for service personnel. Advanced service performance enables attending to customers’ personal well-being and caring for their unique needs effectively. The proposed standard for service provision exceeds customer expectations.

Research limitations/implications

First, the number of panellists was low, limiting the generalizability of the results. Future studies should increase the number of panellists. Second, this study focused only on the hotel industry in Taiwan. The results may not be generalizable to other hospitality industries or other countries. Future studies can duplicate this study in other hospitality industries and in other countries to broaden the understating of the elements and service standards of delightful service.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide a practical guideline for implementing delightful service. Hotel practitioners are advised to increase the degree of refinement, variety and attentiveness of their facilities and amenities; use sensory elements in their hotel environment and ambiance design; and advance staff members’ service skills to be more proactive, attentive, empathetic and customer-oriented. Carefully designing the core product and advancing the service delivery style can provide hotel guests with an exceptional and unique lodging experience, thus achieving delight.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the implementation of delightful service.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Frank Huber, Frederik Meyer and David Alexander Schmid

This paper aims to investigate the dynamic nature of consumer–brand relationships and, in particular, the passionate dimension of brand love. It explores the relevance of…

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3873

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the dynamic nature of consumer–brand relationships and, in particular, the passionate dimension of brand love. It explores the relevance of the two dimensions of the identification construct (inner and social self) for the creation of passionate love for a brand. More precisely, it attends to the possible mediating character of identification between the perceived utilitarian or hedonic value and passionate brand love. These effects are analysed in consideration of the moderating effect of relationship duration taking a further-reaching perspective and contributing to the understanding of the transformation of the brand love construct within a long-term consumer–brand relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey on universally known brands representing both a hedonic and a utilitarian concept was conducted. The model has been tested using the partial least squares approach to structural equation modelling.

Findings

The effects of the antecedents of passionate brand love in general vary with increasing relationship duration. Inner self has a stronger effect on passionate brand love than social self and becomes even more important as the relationship matures. Hedonic and utilitarian value both show substantial direct and indirect effects, but the importance of utilitarian aspects grows with time, substantiating the rational nature of brand love within a long-term consumer–brand relationship.

Research limitations/implications

As we assessed the perceived duration of an intimate relationship, longitudinal analysis should provide even more profound results.

Practical implications

Inasmuch as emotional attributes drive passionate feelings for a brand, the core utilitarian assets of a brand also evoke passionate love and should be highlighted, especially in long-term relationships with customers.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the interdependent effects of identification and customer perceived value (hedonic and utilitarian value) as antecedents of passionate brand love. This paper adapts a dynamic perspective on consumer–brand relationships by taking into account the moderating effect of perceived relationship duration.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Steven Pike, Constanza Bianchi, Gayle Kerr and Charles Patti

Although the branding literature emerged during the 1940s, research relating to tourism destination branding has only gained momentum since the late 1990s. There remains a…

Downloads
8195

Abstract

Purpose

Although the branding literature emerged during the 1940s, research relating to tourism destination branding has only gained momentum since the late 1990s. There remains a lack of theory in particular that addresses the measurement of the effectiveness of destination branding over time. The purpose of this paper is to test the effectiveness of a model of consumer‐based brand equity (CBBE) for a country destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of CBBE was adapted from the marketing literature and applied to a nation context. The model was tested by using structural equation modelling with data from a large Chilean sample (n=845) comprising a mix of previous visitors and non‐visitors. The model fits the data well.

Findings

The paper reports the results of an investigation into brand equity for Australia as a long‐haul destination in an emerging market. The research took place just before the launch of the nation's fourth new brand campaign in six years. The results indicate Australia is a well‐known but not compelling destination brand for tourists in Chile, which reflects the lower priority the South American market has been given by the national tourism office.

Practical implications

The paper suggested that CBBE measures could be analysed at various points in time to track any strengthening or weakening of market perceptions in relation to brand objectives. A standard CBBE instrument could provide long‐term effectiveness performance measures regardless of changes in destination marketing organisation staff, advertising agency, other stakeholders and budget.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the nation‐branding literature by being one of the first to test the efficacy of a model of CBBE for a tourism destination brand.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Kelly Virginia Phelan, Natasa Christodoulidou, Cary C. Countryman and Leonard J. Kistner

This study aims to examine web site heuristics and their influence on the likelihood to purchase.

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3560

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine web site heuristics and their influence on the likelihood to purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 28 participants was assigned a list of 30 hotel web sites to evaluate according to predetermined criteria and open‐ended questions.

Findings

Results indicated that booking decisions are positively related to a web site's aesthetic appeal. The study found the presence of photographs on a hotel web site was the most significant factor impacting site appeal and influencing the booking decision. Other features affecting purchase decisions included ease of use, color, link availability, lack of web site clutter, and sites unique in appearance.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations included the size and composition of the sample. Respondents were college students, thus they represented a younger demographic and one which may be more tech‐savvy than other age groups. Also, the hotel web sites which were evaluated were located in one popular US tourist destination, meaning generalization to a larger population or to another industry may be limited.

Practical implications

Results showed four variables; pictures, ease of use, neat/uncluttered and plain/boring; were most significant on both site appeal and site influence. Practitioners would be well served to improve these web site elements to better accommodate customers and realize the greatest return on investment.

Originality/value

The paper investigates heuristics of hotel web sites. Findings identified areas for improvement by practitioners as well as areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Pantea Foroudi, Reza Marvi, Mohammad M. Foroudi, Sayabek Ziyadin and Solongo Munkhbat

Finding an efficient way for enhancing brand reputation by using social media among customers and business partners has long been the main purpose of every business…

Abstract

Finding an efficient way for enhancing brand reputation by using social media among customers and business partners has long been the main purpose of every business. However, due to micro and macro changes in the business field, strategies to find a way to improve brand reputation with business partners and customers have altered from transaction marketing to newer approaches such as employing a social media platform. However, not all brands make use of social media to enhance their reputation. The present study uses Apple as an example of the one of the best known brands which does not benefit from social media platforms as to the degree expected.

Details

Beyond Multi-channel Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-686-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Carol Lu, Celine Berchoux, Michael W. Marek and Brendan Chen

The purpose of this paper was to determine whether luxury hotel managers and customers have the same understanding of service quality and satisfaction and whether there is…

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105617

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine whether luxury hotel managers and customers have the same understanding of service quality and satisfaction and whether there is a disparity between services offered by luxury hotels and the way customers actually experience them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used interviews with managers and guests of 5-Star hotels in Taiwan and qualitative analysis to understand definitions and perceptions of luxury, service quality and satisfaction.

Findings

The major findings of the study were that: there were no fundamental disconnects in the respective understandings of managers and guests; however, the two groups used different language to describe luxury, service quality and satisfaction; the managers evaluated satisfaction in terms of services provided, but the guests conceptualized satisfaction in terms of value received for the price of lodging; and luxury, service quality and satisfaction were closely related in the minds of the managers and guests and were not independent constructs.

Research limitations/implications

Recommendations are made based on marketing communications theory, that is all factors identified in this study can be considered to be part of the brand identity of the hotel; local culture can introduce variables that may be outside the scope of international standards; and information on local expectations and preferences can inform advertising and public relations efforts of the hotel.

Originality/value

This study is significant because little research into luxury hotel customer satisfaction has been done using qualitative methodology, which provides a richer understanding of the experiences of the participants than can quantitative design.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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