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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Ambra Burls and Julian Ashton

Drawing on experience of working in the area of mental health and the environment, key issues are examined, and the theoretical framework is explained, including the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on experience of working in the area of mental health and the environment, key issues are examined, and the theoretical framework is explained, including the benefits to communities and to the local environment of working with nature.

Design/methodology/approach

The interview gave an opportunity for development of ideas underlying concepts including the natural health service, green health literacy and changes in behaviour during the pandemic.

Findings

The ways in which people and the environment benefit from interaction with nature are becoming well understood; in a sustainable model, the value of the local environment is appreciated and will benefit from the care of those involved in relevant activities. There is a need for targeted training for health professionals, environment agencies’ staff and the voluntary sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The economic value of nature as a contributing factor in to mental health is an area for research which could have major influence in policymaking. A meeting of a number of disciplines could further bring together social capital, health economics and ecology.

Practical implications

Projects that are sustainable in every sense are those which are long term, whose value can be measured in environmental and economic terms.

Social implications

Working models have been developed that involve people on the fringes of society and people with disabilities; they often become the movers in local organisations.

Originality/value

This is an extremely wide-ranging assessment of developments in the relationship between mental health and nature.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Ambra Burls

Drawing on the author's multi‐method research on the viability of specific ecotherapy practitioner training and curriculum design, this paper debates how the use of…

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Abstract

Drawing on the author's multi‐method research on the viability of specific ecotherapy practitioner training and curriculum design, this paper debates how the use of ecotherapeutic approaches can provide a two‐pronged system to achieve both individual health (at micro level) and public and environment health outcomes (at macro level). The research sought the views of service users, practitioners and educationalists through use of interviews, focus groups, a nominal group, and an ethnographic case study group. This research raised other considerations: namely, that people seeking personal recovery also, through stewardship of green spaces, may achieve unanticipated social capital and natural capital outcomes and thereby meet current multi‐disciplinary policy targets. This added social value has not been previously considered as an important dimension in people's well‐being and recovery from ill health or social exclusion. Such outcomes emerge from the idea of green spaces becoming a ‘product’ delivered to the community by people whose pursuit of personal recovery also directly contributes to improved public mental health.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Ambra Burls

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2018

Woody Caan

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124

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Julian Ashton

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Dave Backwith and Carol Munn‐Giddings

This article relates one aspect of an action research project on work related stress and mental health problems to its wider context. It is argued that self‐help/mutual…

Abstract

This article relates one aspect of an action research project on work related stress and mental health problems to its wider context. It is argued that self‐help/mutual aid, including self‐management, could make an important contribution to tackling the current epidemic of work‐related stress in the UK and elsewhere. Initiatives such as the government's Work‐Life Balance campaign indicate that the policy context is appropriate. An overview of the causes, costs of, and policy responses to work‐related stress is followed by a discussion on the nature of self‐help/mutual aid and the benefits that the sharing of experiential knowledge can bring to participants. This includes a specific, structured form of self‐help: self‐management programmes as led and used by mental health user groups. We conclude that self‐help initiatives can make a valuable contribution to addressing work‐related stress if employers support them. Beyond simply ameliorating staff retention problems, the experiential learning communities that could be created could be an asset, particularly in seeking to change workplace cultures to minimise work‐related mental stresses.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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