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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Chris Wilcoxen, Julie Bell and Amanda Steiner

The purpose of this paper is to explore ways teachers undergoing induction via the Career Advancement and Development of Recruits and Experienced (CADRE) Teachers Project felt…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore ways teachers undergoing induction via the Career Advancement and Development of Recruits and Experienced (CADRE) Teachers Project felt empowered and supported in their well-being through mentoring and coaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys about CADRE Project impact were e-mailed to 675 current and former participants. Out of 438 surveys returned, researchers used homogeneous sampling to identify 341 teacher respondents. Researchers used qualitative thematic analysis to determine ways teachers felt supported.

Findings

Coaching and mentoring supported CADRE Project participants’ well-being through empowerment (theme). Sub-themes included: growth, collaboration, networking, improvement and resources.

Research limitations/implications

Possibilities for future research include exploring the role of mentors/coaches, tracking teachers’ leadership roles and investigating the link between induction and teacher retention in more detail.

Practical implications

Opportunities for growth and collaboration are cornerstones of first-year teacher support. These support systems can lead to a sense of belonging, develop a mindset for continuous improvement and create long-term networking opportunities. The support teachers need to empower them and maintain their well-being changes with each first-year teacher phase.

Originality/value

Few studies exist on induction programs with the longevity of the CADRE Project. The high survey response rate with overwhelmingly positive responses suggests that CADRE is unique in its support of beginning teachers’ well-being through the first-year teacher phases, specifically due to the combination of mentoring and coaching beginning teachers receive.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Political Identification in Europe: Community in Crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-125-7

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Amanda Bezet, Taylor Duncan and Kira Litvin

Librarians at Northcentral University (NCU) provide online synchronous research consultations for students to discuss resources and search strategies for class assignments…

Abstract

Purpose

Librarians at Northcentral University (NCU) provide online synchronous research consultations for students to discuss resources and search strategies for class assignments, papers, presentations, theses and dissertations. The purpose of this paper is to document the implementation and assessment of this service and to seek to demonstrate that research consultations provided by NCU librarians contribute to students’ learning and success.

Design/methodology/approach

Research consultations are scheduled using Springshare LibCal and are conducted via Citrix GoToMeeting. Students report their satisfaction and skills learned via the Research Consultation Satisfaction Survey. Dissertation chairs and faculty instructors complete separate surveys, which assess the effect that research consultations had on their students’ work. All surveys were created using Qualtrics.

Findings

Assessment data reveal that students are satisfied with the research consultation service and can identify specific skills learned. Additionally, faculty and dissertation chairs report an improvement in students’ citations and ability to locate relevant sources. Future research may include examination of learning analytics or citation analysis for students who participated in research consultations.

Originality/value

Research consultations are rarely documented in the scholarly literature. An opportunity exists to make virtual research consultations more widely adopted as a distinct library reference service, and further, to measure the impact of this service. This project demonstrates how to successfully implement and assess online research consultations. Techniques discussed may be used in 100 per cent virtual environments, as well as within traditional, brick and mortar schools that may already offer face-to-face research consultations.

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2024

Ted Ladd, Katarzyna Bachnik, Amanda Nimon-Peters and Sonia Scrocchi

This study examined the relationship between pedagogical self-efficacy and student course evaluations among an international sample of management education faculty. We also…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the relationship between pedagogical self-efficacy and student course evaluations among an international sample of management education faculty. We also investigated gender’s moderating role in this relationship and its impact on the development of pedagogical self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 professors at an international business school, identifying three subdomains of pedagogical self-efficacy: course design, classroom management, and feedback provision. We designed a 25-question faculty survey to measure pedagogical self-efficacy, administered it to 84 faculty members, and analyzed the data alongside 20,000 student course evaluations.

Findings

All three pedagogical self-efficacy domains significantly predicted student course evaluations. The self-efficacy of female faculty had a positive relationship with course evaluations across all subdomains. In contrast, the self-efficacy of male faculty had a negative relationship with course evaluations on the course design subdomain. Student evaluations of courses taught by women were 10% lower than those taught by males and male faculty had significantly higher self-efficacy ratings than their female counterparts.

Practical implications

The results suggest that interventions designed to boost pedagogical self-efficacy can enhance student learning, irrespective of faculty gender. However, given biases in how students perceive female faculty, it is likely that female and male faculty members develop self-efficacy differently.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine how pedagogical self-efficacy affects course evaluations, focusing on gender as a potential moderator. We also added an international higher education perspective to self-efficacy theories.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2017

Rebecca Dolinsky Graham and Amanda Konradi

Residential college campuses remain dangerous – especially for women students who face a persistent threat of sexual violence, despite passage of the 1990 Campus Security Act and…

Abstract

Purpose

Residential college campuses remain dangerous – especially for women students who face a persistent threat of sexual violence, despite passage of the 1990 Campus Security Act and its multiple amendments. Campuses have developed new programming, yet recent research confirms one in five women will experience some form of sexual assault before graduating. Research on campus crime legislation does not describe in detail the context in which it developed. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the effects of early rhetorical frames on the ineffective policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors discuss the rhetorical construction of “campus crime,” and related “criminals” and “victims,” through content analysis and a close interpretive reading of related newspaper articles.

Findings

The 1986 violent rape and murder of Jeanne Clery at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania became iconic in media descriptions of campus crime. Media drew attention to the racial and classed dimensions of the attack on Clery, but elided the misogyny central to all sexual assaults. This reinforced a stereotype that “insiders” on campuses, primarily white and middle class, were most vulnerable to “outsider” attacks by persons of color. Colleges and universities adopted rhetoric of “endangerment” and “unreason” and focused on what potential victims could do to protect themselves, ignoring the role of students in perpetrating crime.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis does not link rhetoric in newspapers to legislative discussion. Further analysis is necessary to confirm the impact of particular claims and to understand why some claims may have superseded others.

Originality/value

This analysis focuses critical attention on how campus crime policy is shaped by cultural frames.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Delivering Sustainable Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044022-4

Abstract

Details

Education Policy as a Roadmap for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-298-5

Abstract

Details

Storytelling-Case Archetype Decoding and Assignment Manual (SCADAM)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-216-0

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Emma A. Jane

While a growing body of literature reveals the prevalence of men's harassment and abuse of women online, scant research has been conducted into women's attacks on each other in…

Abstract

While a growing body of literature reveals the prevalence of men's harassment and abuse of women online, scant research has been conducted into women's attacks on each other in digital networked environments. This chapter responds to this research gap by analyzing data obtained from qualitative interviews with Australian women who have received at times extremely savage cyberhate they know or strongly suspect was sent by other women. Drawing on scholarly literature on historical intra-feminism schisms – specifically what have been dubbed the “mommy wars” and the “sex wars” – this chapter argues that the conceptual lenses of internalized misogyny and lateral violence are useful in their framing of internecine conflict within marginalized groups as diagnostic of broader, systemic oppression rather than being solely the fault of individual actors. These lenses, however, require multiple caveats and have many limitations. In conclusion, I canvas the possibility that the pressure women may feel to present a united front in the interests of feminist politics could itself be considered an outcome of patriarchal oppression (even if performing solidarity is politically expedient and/or essential). As such, there might come a time when openly renouncing discourses of sisterhood and feeling free to disagree with, and even dislike, other women might be considered markers of liberation.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Jennie C. Stephens, Maria E. Hernandez, Mikael Román, Amanda C. Graham and Roland W. Scholz

The goal of this paper is to enhance consideration for the potential for institutions of higher education throughout the world, in different cultures and contexts, to be change…

10504

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to enhance consideration for the potential for institutions of higher education throughout the world, in different cultures and contexts, to be change agents for sustainability. As society faces unprecedented and increasingly urgent challenges associated with accelerating environmental change, resource scarcity, increasing inequality and injustice, as well as rapid technological change, new opportunities for higher education are emerging.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on the emerging literature on transition management and identifies five critical issues to be considered in assessing the potential for higher education as a change agent in any particular region or place. To demonstrate the value of these critical issues, exemplary challenges and opportunities in different contexts are provided.

Findings

The five critical issues include regional‐specific dominant sustainability challenges, financing structure and independence, institutional organization, the extent of democratic processes, and communication and interaction with society.

Originality/value

Given that the challenges and opportunities for higher education as a change agent are context‐specific, identifying, synthesizing, and integrating common themes is a valuable and unique contribution.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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