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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Taísa Rezende Teixeira Farias, Maria Cecília Evangelista Vasconcelos Schiassi, Patrícia Aparecida Pimenta Pereira, Vanessa Rios de Souza, Amanda Maria Teixeira Lago, Soraia Vilela Borges and Fabiana Queiroz

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the bodying agents (erythritol, sorbitol, xylitol and polydextrose) and their mixtures on the preparation of mixed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of the bodying agents (erythritol, sorbitol, xylitol and polydextrose) and their mixtures on the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves (marolo, soursop and sweet passion fruit).

Design/methodology/approach

The simplex mixture design was used for product optimization and the preserves evaluated by physical, physicochemical and sensory properties. The research data were analyzed using regression equations on SAS University and exploratory analysis by principal component analysis and parallel factors techniques on Sensomaker software.

Findings

The results show that erythritol and polydextrose bodying agents should not be used as pure components because they provoked changes in the properties of the final product and negatively influenced the sensory attributes. While the high concentrations of xylitol and sorbitol provided better sensorial acceptance, being considered, therefore, good substitutes for sucrose.

Practical implications

This research has shown it is feasible to use bodying agents in the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves without added sugar.

Social implications

The development of mixed preserves could increase population access to the Brazilian Cerrado fruits. In addition, sugar-free preserves are a viable alternative for adding value to the product and satisfy all the consumers.

Originality/value

The combination of properties of two or more fruits and use of bodying agents can improve sensory, physical and physicochemical characteristics of the final product. However, there are technological challenges to evaluate in the preparation of mixed Brazilian Cerrado fruit preserves without added sugar.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to optimize a mixed juice made from Brazilian Cerrado fruits (cagaita, mangaba and marolo).

Design/methodology/approach

The juices were evaluated by rheological, physical, physicochemical, nutritional and sensory acceptance analyses. The mixture design is a widely used tool for product optimization, allowing the determination of factors, combinations and levels that provide best responses.

Findings

The results show that using mangaba pulp negatively contributed to juice acceptance, but resulted in the highest ascorbic acid content. The treatments produced using cagaita and marolo pulps presented a greater acceptance by consumers, and contributed to higher antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds content. The juice prepared with a mixture of equivalent quantities of the three fruits had the highest β-carotene and lycopene contents.

Practical implications

This research has shown that different fruit combinations can improve sensory and nutritional characteristics, adding value to the final product.

Social implications

The processing of mixed juices could increase population access to the nutrients present in Brazilian Cerrado fruits, given that they are seasonal and perishable fruits.

Originality/value

In recent years, there has been an increase in the development of new food products based on Cerrado native fruits, however information on the chemical and nutritional characteristics, rheological behavior, and sensory attributes of the derivative products are still limited, resulting in a lack of scientific investments in this area. In addition, it is necessary to optimize the developed products to offer the consumer a unique product, combining the characteristics of two or more fruits, which adds value to the final product.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Maria Cecília Evangelista Vasconcelos Schiassi, Vanessa Rios de Souza, Nathila Angela Alves, Amanda Maria Teixeira Lago, Sérgio Henrique Silva, Gabriel Ribeiro Carvalho, Jaime Vilela de Resende and Fabiana Queiroz

The purpose of this paper was to study the effect of botanical origin on the characteristics of single-flower honeys (assa-peixe, coffee, eucalyptus, laranjeira and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to study the effect of botanical origin on the characteristics of single-flower honeys (assa-peixe, coffee, eucalyptus, laranjeira and vassourinha), polyfloral (silvestre), extrafloral (sugarcane) and honeydew (bracatinga) during storage.

Design/methodology/approach

The honeys were stored at 14 °C, and the analysis of water activity, color, absorbance, rheological behavior and microscopic analysis were performed during 6 months (T0, T30, T60, T90, T120, T150 and T180 days); quantification of sugars (fructose (F) and glucose (G)), moisture (M), F/G and G/M ratio only at T0.

Findings

All honeys showed changes during storage, and sugarcane honey stood out for presenting greater crystallization, influenced by the high content of glucose and fructose. Coffee honey showed the least crystallization. The crystallization of honeys influenced the increase in water activity, Newtonian viscosity, color and absorbance. The composition of the honeys directly influenced the crystallization process during storage.

Originality/value

Crystallization is a natural process that occurs spontaneously in honey. Thus, the knowledge of the crystallization rate of honeys from different origins (botanical and geographical) during storage, is of great importance and interest for the industry, beekeepers and consumers, since each type of honey crystallizes in different ways and periods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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