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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2022

Amanda Jane Davies, Irwyn Shepherd and Elyssebeth Leigh

Globally, private and public organisations invest ever increasing amounts of money, time and effort to develop leadership capabilities in current and future leaders…

Abstract

Purpose

Globally, private and public organisations invest ever increasing amounts of money, time and effort to develop leadership capabilities in current and future leaders. Whilst such investment results in benefits for some, the full value of developmental strategies on offer is not always realised. Challenges inhibiting achievement of full value include struggling to identify learning programs that best fit with the organisational structure, culture, mission and vision and difficulties in maximising engagement of personnel at multiple levels of the management structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this study is to introduce a pathway for health services to develop and embed simulation-based educational strategies that provide targeted learning for leaders and teams. Aligning this approach to leadership development through presentation of case studies in which the model has been applied illustrates the pathway for application in the health-care sector.

Findings

The findings of the approach to leadership development are presented through the presentation of a case study illustrating application of the ADELIS model to simulation-based learning.

Practical implications

The ADELIS model, outlined in this study, provides a guide for creating customised and flexible learning designs that apply simulation-based learning, enabling organisations to develop and provide leadership training for individuals, units and teams that is appropriately fit for purpose.

Originality/value

The key contribution to health-care leadership development offered in this study is the rationale for using simulation-based learning accompanied by a model and pathway for creating such a pedagogical approach, which embraces the reality of workplace circumstances.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Amanda Jane Davies and Ashok Kumar Kochhar

Recent years have witnessed considerable interest in benchmarking as a technique for measuring performance against world class performers and identifying best practices…

1009

Abstract

Recent years have witnessed considerable interest in benchmarking as a technique for measuring performance against world class performers and identifying best practices. However, a study carried out to ascertain the extent of use of benchmarking and best practice in manufacturing companies revealed that this interest has resulted in a limited use of benchmarking in overall terms and, in particular, has not led to benchmarking being undertaken at lower levels of manufacturing organisations. For example, the activities associated with manufacturing planning and control systems. This paper reports on the obstacles to benchmarking in companies and suggests the prerequisites necessary for carrying out an effective benchmarking study. It also discusses the importance of applying benchmarking activities to the lower levels of manufacturing organisations. The study was based on detailed field studies carried out in four batch manufacturing companies. It investigated 15 areas of manufacturing planning and control to establish the level of benchmarking and implementation of best practices within them.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2010

Jane Ireland, Nicola Graham‐Kevan, Michelle Davies and Douglas Fry

Abstract

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Jane Parker, Amanda Young-Hauser, Janet Sayers, Patricia Loga, Selu Paea and Shirley Barnett

Despite the need for such, little scholarly attention has been paid to transdisciplinary enquiry into gender inequities in workplaces. The authors provide a pragmatic…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the need for such, little scholarly attention has been paid to transdisciplinary enquiry into gender inequities in workplaces. The authors provide a pragmatic evaluation of the transdisciplinary research (TDR) model by Hall et al. (2012) for framing the study of this societal issue, shedding light on the challenges, principles and values that could usefully inform subsequent TDR in organisational settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the model in relation to TDR on gender inequities in New Zealand's public service by Hall et al. (2012) Content analysis on our reflective narratives from research team meetings, email exchanges, informal discussions and a workshop reveals TDR study insights. Findings show support for the model and its four broad phases and surface principles and values for applied TDR enquiry that addresses societal challenges in the organisational context.

Findings

The adoption of a TDR model to examine a study of equity in the public service revealed practical and conceptual challenges, encouraging ongoing reflection and adaptive behaviour on the researchers' part. The pragmatic evaluation also highlighted environmental constraints on undertaking TDR, with implications for the ambition of future studies.

Research limitations/implications

This evaluative enquiry encourages similar research in other organisational and national settings to validate the use of TDR to gain insightful, contextualised understandings of social challenges centred in the organisational setting.

Practical implications

This pragmatic evaluation of a TDR model's capacity to approximate the approach and phases of our applied enquiry lays the groundwork to refining TDR approaches used in subsequent studies aimed at addressing societal issues in the organisational setting.

Social implications

This paper can potentially promote greater collaboration between research scholars and other stakeholders wanting to develop TDR paradigms and applied enquiry that can meaningfully inform workplace and societal impacts.

Originality/value

This pragmatic evaluation of a TDR approach involves its initial application to the study of equity at work and develops principles and values that could inform TDR paradigms and methodologies of subsequent enquiries in the field.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1965

THE Manchester School of Librarianship was founded in October 1946, one of the original five schools opened in the autumn of that year. It was attached to the Department…

66

Abstract

THE Manchester School of Librarianship was founded in October 1946, one of the original five schools opened in the autumn of that year. It was attached to the Department of Industrial Administration in the Manchester College of Science and Technology and was thus something of an exception, as the majority of schools of librarianship were attached to Colleges of Commerce or general Colleges of Further Education. As accommodation was very limited in this rapidly expanding college, the then City Librarian of Manchester, Charles Nowell, kindly offered the use of two rooms in the Central Library, so after a brief period in the College building, the students were moved to the Central Library, though the School remained administratively a part of the College. Many former students must have memories of those two curving rooms, the Manchester Room and the Lancashire Room, with their old‐fashioned school desks.

Details

New Library World, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Lisa Sheppard

Purpose – This chapter reflects upon my experiences as a PhD researcher examining the portrayal of multiculturalism in contemporary Welsh- and English-language fiction…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter reflects upon my experiences as a PhD researcher examining the portrayal of multiculturalism in contemporary Welsh- and English-language fiction about Wales. It discusses my emotions regarding my identities as a second-language Welsh speaker and as an early career researcher, and how they affected my participation in this field.

Methodology/Approach – The chapter draws on my PhD research, which examined how different cultural groups were portrayed in fiction as ‘others’ due to Wales’s complex linguistic and cultural position. This involved analysing contextual research about multiculturalism in Wales to explore discourses of belonging and alienation. This chapter reflects upon my emotional responses to the field as a Welsh speaker and new academic, and how this in turn affected my research.

Findings – Embracing my changing relationship with my Welsh-speaking identity, I reflect on how my research touched upon contradictory feelings I had about the Welsh language and Welshness. I discuss the effects my changing feelings over time about linguistic hybridity, and my growing confidence as a young academic, had on my engagement with different texts and writers. This is discussed in light of the relationships I was able to form with some creative authors and academics in Wales’s close-knit literary and scholarly society.

Originality/Value – This chapter argues that confronting their own emotional engagements with their research topics enables researchers to better understand why certain subjects are so contested. It can also prepare researchers to communicate their ideas effectively in the difficult debates that arise around such subjects.

Details

Emotion and the Researcher: Sites, Subjectivities, and Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-611-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the…

5352

Abstract

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Jeannette Oppedisano and Kenneth Laird

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a…

1162

Abstract

This article presents a pedagogical model that utilizes students as primary researchers in the identification, interviewing, and then reporting on women entrepreneurs as a major component of a multidisciplinary entrepreneurship course. The purpose of the course is to attract students who may not be familiar with the entrepreneurship concept itself, the role of women in such economic ventures, or the possibilities for people like themselves in such a career avenue. Students are exposed to the accomplishments of women entrepreneurs throughout U.S. history in the broad categories of agriculture and mining; construction; communication; manufacturing; service (both for profit and not-for-profit); transportation; and wholesale and retail trade. This content experience is then enhanced by the studentsʼ own direct interaction with and interviewing of women entrepreneurs. The implementation, potential outcomes, and possible adaptations of the course are described, and this transformational learning process model is illustrated.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

1 – 10 of 19