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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09596119010002179. When citing…

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Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09596119010002179. When citing the article, please cite: Amanda J. West, Stephanie M. Jameson, (1990), “Supervised Work Experience in Graduate Employment”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Vol. 2 Iss: 2.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Amanda J. West and Stephanie M. Jameson

The relationship between supervised work experience and hospitalitygraduate employment is examined. Research which indicates thathospitality employers must consider…

Abstract

The relationship between supervised work experience and hospitality graduate employment is examined. Research which indicates that hospitality employers must consider supervised work experience as a key factor influencing graduates′ first destinations is identified. It proposes that further research is necessary to enhance the success of graduate recruitment and retention strategies.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2016

B. Ariel Blair

Abstract

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Followership in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-947-3

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Case study
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Christina Sue-Chan and Kelly Fisher

This case presents the leadership challenges that Chief Petty Officer Amanda Smith navigated as the first woman assigned to lead a Flight Line work center at NAS Ionian…

Abstract

Synopsis

This case presents the leadership challenges that Chief Petty Officer Amanda Smith navigated as the first woman assigned to lead a Flight Line work center at NAS Ionian, an organization that was characterized by a culture of “hegemonic masculinity.” Failure to effectively lead the work center could have catastrophic consequences, including death of service personnel. Flight Line work centers, located in naval air stations throughout the world, serviced the air operations of aircraft carriers of the US Navy and provided allied air support. The assignment was a test of Smith’s leadership because the NAS Ionian Flight Line had experienced a spate of misconduct by personnel and had failed important maintenance inspections. Chief Smith was tasked to improve the morale and performance of the work center’s sailors who had diverse personal and professional backgrounds. She was also directed to ensure that the work center passed important maintenance inspections despite the challenges of dealing with subordinates, rank peers, and senior officers who had never previously worked with a woman in her role.

Research methodology

The case study is based on primary data collected from the protagonist, a.k.a. Amanda Smith. The primary data are supplemented with secondary data from published sources. The names of the air station and the protagonist have been altered to protect the identity of individuals in the case.

Relevant courses and levels

The case is applicable to senior undergraduate courses in HRM performance or talent management, training and development as well as in MBA or other Master’s level courses in management, industrial-organizational psychology, organizational behavior and leadership.

Theoretical bases

The case deals with leadership style (e.g. Initiating structure – organizing work, giving structure to the work context, defining role responsibility, scheduling work activities; consideration – building camaraderie, respect, trust, and liking between leaders and followers); organizational culture; diversity management; power and influence; and performance management.

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The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Amanda S. Hinojosa, Megan J. Doughty Shaine and Kelly Davis McCauley

We discuss how attachment theory can help leaders maintain security in their relationships with followers during crisis, using the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic as an…

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Abstract

Purpose

We discuss how attachment theory can help leaders maintain security in their relationships with followers during crisis, using the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic as an example. We describe how the COVID-19 pandemic has undermined the typical ways leaders may have fostered secure relationships with their followers. Guided by Lewin's action research paradigm, we integrate research on attachment theory with recent research on the COVID-19 pandemic to present leader interventions to maintain attachment security in spite of the disruption caused by COVID-19. We then discuss how these propositions can guide leader interventions in other types of crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Attachment theory has received considerable attention in recent years from management and leadership scholars. We extend this line of inquiry by drawing parallels between the strange situation, a now classic paradigm for researching infant–caregiver attachment systems, to understand attachment security in leader–follower relationships during times of crisis.

Findings

We find that the crises such as COVID-19 present a challenge to attachment security in leader–follower relationships. We also find that research on adult attachment in response to crises and traumatic events is relevant to understanding how leaders can foster positive relations with followers during times of crisis when physical proximity is not possible.

Originality/value

We apply attachment theory and leadership research to present a framework for leadership during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, many of our theoretical assertions and related interventions could be applied to other unprecedented crises that disrupt leader–follower relationships. Hence, our paper offers a unique lens that is centered on the attachment security within the leader–follower relationship during crisis.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

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Pedestrian Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-848-55750-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Philmore Alleyne, Wayne Charles-Soverall, Tracey Broome and Amanda Pierce

Whistleblowing has been receiving increased attention and support in recent times as a means of detecting and correcting wrongdoing in organizations. This study aims to…

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1051

Abstract

Purpose

Whistleblowing has been receiving increased attention and support in recent times as a means of detecting and correcting wrongdoing in organizations. This study aims to examine perceptions, attitudes and consequences (actions and reactions) of whistleblowing, as well as the predictors of internal and external whistleblowing intentions, by using Graham’s (1986) model of principled organizational dissent in a small emerging and collectivist culture like Barbados.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a self-administered survey of 282 accounting employees working in organizations in Barbados.

Findings

Results reveal that there is little awareness of whistleblowing legislation. Most respondents perceive whistleblowing as ethical and favor internal over external whistleblowing. Findings show that personal responsibility and personal costs significantly influence internal whistleblowing intentions, while personal costs influence external whistleblowing. Using qualitative data, several themes emerged as influencing whistleblowing: perceived benefits of whistleblowing, actual whistleblowing experiences (handling of reports), personal costs (climate of fear and hostility), perceived lack of anonymity and cultural norms.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should control for social desirability bias and use more rigorous qualitative approaches such as face-to-face interviews and focus groups to gain in-depth opinions and feelings on the topic.

Practical implications

Whistleblowing can be achieved through such mechanisms as perceived organizational support, strong ethical codes of conduct, rewarding ethical behavior and promoting sound work ethics in organizations.

Originality/value

This paper explores whistleblowing in an emerging economy where there has been little research on the topic. Thus, this study supplements the existing research in emerging economies by examining the applicability of Graham’s (1986) model of principled organizational dissent.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Claire Anumba, A.R.J. Dainty, S.G. Ison and Amanda Sergeant

The UK construction industry faces unprecedented skills demands which have been fuelled by sustained sectoral growth and a concurrent downturn in the number of young…

Abstract

The UK construction industry faces unprecedented skills demands which have been fuelled by sustained sectoral growth and a concurrent downturn in the number of young people entering the industry. However, patterns of supply and demand are not uniform across the country, with regional and local skills shortages being determined by the specific socio‐economic context of the area under consideration. Thus, developing effective labour market policy demands spatially‐oriented labour market information which can be reconciled against industry growth forecasts within a particular region or locality. This paper explores the potential of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in providing such a mechanism for enhancing the labour market planning process. The paper details how GIS can aid construction labour market planning through its ability to integrate disparate labour market information efficiently, thereby placing analysts in a better position to understand specific spatial patterns. A range of datasets were strategically combined in order to reveal regional nuances in labour demand and supply which would be difficult to discern without the use of such a tool. Although the GIS output would need to be considered in combination with a range of other forecasting techniques if robust projects of labour demand and shortage are to be generated, it nevertheless offers an effective decision‐support tool for informing labour market policy in the future.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Jeff Gold, Tony Oldroyd, Ed Chesters, Amanda Booth and Adrian Waugh

This paper seeks to show appreciation for the collective endeavour of work practices based on varying degrees of dependence, interdependence and mutuality between at least…

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1698

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to show appreciation for the collective endeavour of work practices based on varying degrees of dependence, interdependence and mutuality between at least two people. Such dependencies have to be concerned with how talent is used and how this use is an interaction between people, a process called talenting. The aim of this paper is to provide a method to explore talenting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a brief overview of recent debates relating to talent management (TM). This paper argues that TM seldom pays attention to work practices where performance is frequently a collective endeavour. A mapping method is explained to identify work practices and obtain narrative data. This paper provides a case to explore talenting in West Yorkshire Police.

Findings

In total, 12 examples are found and 3 are presented showing the value of various forms of dependency to achieve outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

TM needs to move beyond employment practices to work practices. There is a need to close the gap between traditional TM employment practices, usually individually focused, and work practices which are most likely to require a collective endeavour.

Practical implications

There needs be ongoing appreciation of talenting to add to TM activities.

Social implications

This paper recognises a more inclusive approach to TM based on work performance.

Originality/value

This paper, to the best of the authors’s knowledge, is probably the first enquiry of its kind.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2020

Amanda Elizabeth Bruck and Kayleigh Garthwaite

We explore how neoliberal logic has led to an erosion of social-welfare programs and pervades organizational structures and functions of a third-sector organization. Based…

Abstract

Purpose

We explore how neoliberal logic has led to an erosion of social-welfare programs and pervades organizational structures and functions of a third-sector organization. Based upon fieldwork in a foodbank in the North-West of England, we discuss the impact of economic cuts upon organizational norms of the foodbank, and the intersection with the provision of charity support and personal relationships between the staff, volunteers and visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This article analyses pervasiveness of neoliberalism on a foodbank and the impact this has on organizational norms and relationships found within the organization. It integrates themes of structural violence, neoliberal discourse in the charity sector, notions of (un)deservingness and appropriate of time.

Findings

Our research finds how a hostile environment transpires in a third-sector organization under increased economic and bureaucratic pressures and from this, organizational rules emerge that ignore the lived experiences of the people it serves. Herein, visitors must learn the organization's norms and garner relationships to be able to navigate the organization to successfully access essential resources.

Originality/value

The findings in this article will be of interest to academics researching poverty and organizational norms, professionals in the charity-sector and policy makers. Rules originating from economic and bureaucratic pressures can establish barriers to accessing essential material resources. It informs the pressures felt in balancing access to support services with personal timetables, and the need to include visitors' voices in establishing norms.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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