Search results

1 – 8 of 8
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Hang Vo, Richard John Kirkham, Terry Mervyn Williams, Amanda Howells, Rick Forster and Terry Cooke-Davies

Effective and robust governance of major projects and programmes in the public sector is crucial to the accountability of the state and the transparency of state spending…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective and robust governance of major projects and programmes in the public sector is crucial to the accountability of the state and the transparency of state spending. The theoretical discourse on governance, in the context of projects and programmes, is not fully mature, although is now sufficiently well developed to warrant an increased scholarly focus on practice. This paper aims to contribute to the empirical literature through a study of assurance routines in the UK Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP).

Design/methodology/approach

A framework analysis approach to the evaluation of a subset of GMPP database generates original insights into (1) the framing of assurance review recommendations, (2) the treatment of assurance review data and (3) the subsequent tracking of the implementation of actions arising from the assurance review process.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the “delivery confidence” of the major projects and programmes included in this study improves during the time that they are assured on the GMPP. This would suggest that “enhanced” governance routines are desirable in programmes and projects that exhibit high degrees of complexity and scale.

Originality/value

The research findings contribute to the wider conversations in this journal and elsewhere on project governance routines and governance-as-practice in the context of government and public services.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Kerry McGannon

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were interrogated as cultural sites of analysis to accomplish this aim.

Approach

A critical social constructionist perspective on disordered eating is outlined along with narrative research findings on female athletes and disordered eating. A discursive psychological approach and critical discourse analysis (CDA) is then discussed to theorize and study meanings of disordered eating and athlete identities/subject positions. Next, the utility of studying two elite female athlete’s autobiographies is outlined followed by examples from a CDA of two athlete stories.

Findings

Two discourses and two identity/subject positions within each are outlined: discourse of performance and the “committed, controlled athlete” and a discourse of personal growth and the “empowered athlete in transition.” The features of each discourse and subject position are outlined and examples from each athlete’s story. The intention is to show the ways in which discursive resources construct the body, food and identities in sport and the implications.

Implications

The chapter is concluded with why studying “disordered eating and body talk” within discourses is useful to expand understanding of constraining and emancipative aspects of athlete identities, struggle and recovery.

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Thomas Hainey, Gavin Baxter and Amanda Ford

Rudimentary programming is an essential, transferrable, problem solving skill in many higher education (HE) programmes in academic institutions including Software…

Abstract

Purpose

Rudimentary programming is an essential, transferrable, problem solving skill in many higher education (HE) programmes in academic institutions including Software Engineering, Business Information Technology, Computer Games Development, Design and Technology. The purpose of this paper is to address some of the problematic issues associated with teaching programming by the utilisation of a new novel teaching approach called games-based construction learning (GBCL) to attempt to increase motivation, engagement and learning effectiveness. An international and national trend is to introduce coding at earlier education levels resulting in upper primary education (PE) being the focus of this paper to ascertain if GBCL using Scratch to teach programming concepts is more effective at different levels of upper PE.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale empirical study introducing GBCL to teach programming concepts into 16 classes between levels 4 and 7 in PE utilising 384 children. A detailed implementation framework for GBCL using Scratch in PE was utilised to address all incorporation issues and the games constructed by the children scored utilising a game codification scheme specifically designed to address programming and design as a quantification rubric. The experiment utilised eight 1- h lessons on GBCL using Scratch.

Findings

The resulted in 178 games of varying levels of complexity developed. The results indicated that GBCL was an effective mechanism to teach programming concepts using Scratch at all levels of upper PE. Primary seven students scored higher in relation to the design metric of the quantification codification rubric.

Research limitations/implications

Under the Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) in Scotland non-traditional teaching approaches are encouraged and development of digital literacy skill is highly advocated. This has resulted in a new approach, novel approach called GBCL where children create their own games utilising an engine such as Scratch is gaining significant attention in terms of being a novel approach. Despite a plethora of similar studies associated with GBCL, it is still not as developed as games-based learning and requires further empirical studies to support the validity of the approach and resolve identified issues.

Practical implications

Computer programming itself can lead to a highly rewarding career in a number of sectors from games development to banking, such as cybersecurity and systems development. In the last decade, in particular due to the ubiquitous nature of technology there is an increasing international and national trend associated with teaching rudimentary programming concepts at a far younger age including secondary education and the upper PE level. Introducing programming at an earlier level is now being considered essential as the path to transfer from novice to expert programmer level in time is considered nearly a decade approximately. The introduction of GBCL interventions may yield positive results in a supplementary learning capacity in accordance with the CfE and increase the educational effectiveness of programming education in later levels of education.

Originality/value

This study presents a large-scale empirical evaluation of GBCL in upper PE utilising a compiled implementation framework for incorporation and a detailed game codification scheme to quantify the games produced highlighting coding constructs and design.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Amanda Bishop and Jayne Henry

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several…

Abstract

The following case study describes the assessment, formulation and treatment of a man with mild learning disabilities and a history of violent behaviour. Following several years of offence‐related work, identification of chronic low self‐esteem provided an alternative approach to addressing the risk of violence by treatment based on the cognitive model of low self‐esteem. Global self‐esteem and fear of negative evaluation were assessed at baseline, middle and end of treatment and at one‐month follow‐up. Although scores improved over the course of 23 sessions and were maintained at one‐month follow‐up, the change was minimal and unlikely to be clinically significant. However, the client reported benefits from therapy and there were observable positive behaviour changes. Discharge was facilitated from secure services to supported living in the community. The results from this case study show that, with adaptation, cognitive behavioural therapy for low self‐esteem may successfully be applied to people with mild learning disabilities. Therapy to address issues underlying offending behaviour is often required in addition to offending behaviour programmes in order to reduce risk of re‐offending.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Andy Smith

To examine some of the complex relationships that exist between sports work and mental health and illness.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine some of the complex relationships that exist between sports work and mental health and illness.

Design/Method/Approach

This chapter draws upon prevalence data, athlete testimonies, and theoretical works to examine: (1) the prevalence of depression and suicide in professional sport and the wider society; (2) athlete experiences of depression and suicidal ideation, particularly among men; and (3) some of the key sociological ideas which might help to explain experiences of mental health and illness in professional sports work.

Findings

Although there are plentiful data on the societal prevalence of depression and suicide, increasing interest in the mental health of professional athletes (and other types of sports workers) has occurred largely in response to individual or clusters of often publicly known, sometimes high profile, cases rather than in response to systematic empirical grounded data. Athlete experiences of mental illness are shown to be related in complex ways to various constraints associated with their public and private lives, to the constraints of their interdependency networks, and to experiences of shame which can have a series of deleterious acute and chronic health costs.

Research Limitations/Implications

Since much of what is currently known about the links between sports work and mental health and illness is derived from largely psychological studies and media-led or autobiographical accounts, more sociological research is needed to better understand the costs of mental health of working in often very public and highly pressurized, medicalized, scientized, and performance-focused performance sport settings.

Details

Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Paul Withers, Natalie Boulton, James Morrison and Amanda Jones

The purpose of this paper pertains to the implementation of an occupational therapy service within a newly‐established medium secure service for 16 men with intellectual…

1288

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper pertains to the implementation of an occupational therapy service within a newly‐established medium secure service for 16 men with intellectual disabilities and additional diagnosis of personality disorder located in the North West of England.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a general review, providing a descriptive account of the development and implementation of an occupational therapeutic provision for men residing in a medium secure unit with a dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and personality disorder and a service user account of its efficacy.

Findings

The paper seeks to illustrate the efficacy of occupational therapy implemented by a specifically recruited and trained staff team, describing engagement in meaningful, bespoke programmes of occupation used to assist service users to address deficit areas via mutual engagement in activities, serving to facilitate the formation and development of positive and trusting relationships between service users and staff. The impact of the service is described from a service user's perspective.

Originality/value

There is very little literature relating to those with intellectual disability also diagnosed with personality disorder. There appears to be no specific study of occupational therapy amongst those with dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and personality disorder. This paper is therefore unique in its approach and provides an overview of both the process and method used to implement occupational therapy, as well as a service user perspective and an illustration of its efficacy in a medium secure setting.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1904

IN 1896 an early printed Missale speciale was discovered in the collection of Ludwig Rosenthal of Munich. Two years later appeared a thirty‐paged pamphlet, entitled Ein

Abstract

IN 1896 an early printed Missale speciale was discovered in the collection of Ludwig Rosenthal of Munich. Two years later appeared a thirty‐paged pamphlet, entitled Ein Missale speciale, Vorläufer des Psalteriums von 1457, from the pen of Herr Otto Hupp. Soon after the publication of this pamphlet an abbreviated missal, illustrated with a wood‐cut, was found in the Benedictine Monastery of Lavanthal, in Carinthia. Towards the end of last year, as a consequence of this further discovery, Herr Hupp issued a second work of ninety‐eight folio pages, entitled Gutenberg's erste Druke, in which he developed the theory, first embodied in his former pamphlet, that the Missale speciale and the Missale Abbreviation are earlier examples of Gutenberg's work than the Psalmorum Codex, the Mazarin or forty‐two‐line Bible, or even the thirty‐one‐line indulgence of 1454, which is generally attributed to him. These two treatises have sprung a learned squabble in German and other continental bibliogaphical circles. Dr. Gottfried Zedler, of Wiesbaden, has constituted himself champion of the opponents of the theory, and the chief parties in the quarrel have just fought the matter out in the pages of the Centraiblatt für Bibliothekswesen.

Details

New Library World, vol. 6 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Clive G. Long, Natalie Bell, Alison Carr, Lisa Cairns, Amanda Webb and Lesley Collins

The purpose of this paper is to assess the behavioural and psychological effects on people with intellectual disabilities of transferring to an environment influenced by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the behavioural and psychological effects on people with intellectual disabilities of transferring to an environment influenced by patient choice and low secure standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Patients and staff transferring from a non-optimal environment to one driven by low secure standards compared the homeliness, ward climate and satisfaction with the two wards. Comparisons were made between the occurrences of risk behaviours on the two wards.

Findings

The new environment was rated by staff as more homely while patients’ increased satisfaction with the new ward was reflected in social climate ratings of patient cohesion and experienced safety. The latter findings were reinforced by an objective reduction in risk behaviours in the new environment.

Practical implications

Treatment interventions need to optimise research findings that attest to the influence of the environment on the behaviour of patients with intellectual disabilities.

Originality/value

Findings highlight need to increase the focus on aspects of the built environment in planning the treatment of women in secure care.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8