Search results

1 – 10 of 37
To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Boris Urban, Stephanie Althea Townsend and Amanda Bowen

At the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to: evaluate the factors influencing entrepreneurship in an African context; discuss the relevance of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, the students should be able to: evaluate the factors influencing entrepreneurship in an African context; discuss the relevance of developmental entrepreneurship in an African context; assess an enabling environment and ecosystem for stimulating entrepreneurship; analyse and resolve practical issues in starting a business under challenging conditions; understand how accelerator programmes work in an African context; appreciate how partnerships can be leveraged to foster entrepreneurship; evaluate relevant business models and their challenges to grow enterprises; and understand the social entrepreneurship journey of a founder.

Case overview/synopsis

In March 2019, Elena Gaffurini, managing partner of DEV Mozambique (DEV), sat down to evaluate the business. DEV, based in Maputo and launched in 2015, was a consulting and services company supporting entrepreneurial development in Mozambique, by training and supporting small businesses in agricultural-related sectors to improve food security. Gaffurini – a self-proclaimed purpose-driven person – now questioned whether DEV’s impact on social and economic development was significant enough to justify the effort she and her team put into it and whether DEV should reconsider its current business model to create more impact.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate: MBA and Executive Education.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 1 January 2011

John Luiz, Amanda Bowen and Claire Beswick

Sustainable development; business, government, and society.

Abstract

Subject area

Sustainable development; business, government, and society.

Study level/applicability

The case is designed to be taught to students at MBA and MA level.

Case overview

In February 2009, Justin Smith, manager of the good business journey at Woolworths, a leading South African department store, was a worried man. Woolworths had launched its five-year sustainability strategy just under two years before. After undertaking an impact assessment, Smith was concerned that the original targets – which covered transformation, social development, the environment and climate change – had been set without a clear understanding of exactly what it would take to achieve them. Woolworths had recently identified ten key risk areas that impacted on the achievement of its original goals. If the sustainability goals were not reached, Woolworths could lose credibility among its shareholders, staff, and consumers. What did Woolworths need to do to ensure that it achieved its sustainability goals? And had the company been too ambitious in the targets it had set initially, he wondered?

Expected learning outcomes

To examine the differences, if any, between sustainable development in South Africa and other developing nations and sustainable development in developed nations; to impart an understanding of sustainability in its broadest sense; to investigate the challenges in implementing sustainability strategies in business; to look at ways of measuring the success of sustainability strategies; and to explore whether and how sustainability strategies should differ across industry sectors and across companies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Amanda Bowens, Mike Robinson, Ruth McDonald and Phil Ayres

The Path.Finder NHS consortium consists of ten acute hospitals sharing a common approach to the production and dissemination of local information for primary care…

Abstract

The Path.Finder NHS consortium consists of ten acute hospitals sharing a common approach to the production and dissemination of local information for primary care, including clinical practice guidelines. Ten local guidelines were studied across four clinical areas: dyspepsia, lipids, eczema, and menorrhagia. Local guideline developers largely appear to be unconvinced that investment of time and resources in “proper” guideline development is cost‐effective. At the same time, primary care professionals’ views about future NICE guidelines may have been coloured by their current much more variable experience. Successful implementation of local guidelines is unlikely to be straightforward.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Amanda C. Ginter and M. Elise Radina

To examine the lived experiences of the biological adult daughters of women with breast cancer.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the lived experiences of the biological adult daughters of women with breast cancer.

Research approach

Family systems theory and phenomenology were used to guide this exploratory, qualitative study. Qualitative data were collected via one-time, semi-structured interviews with adult daughters of women with breast cancer.

Findings

Predominant themes included: close mother–daughter relationships, untimely disclosure of information, attentive fathers, optimistic outlooks, and influences on participants’ intimate relationships. Perceived strong familial and intimate relationships prior to breast cancer diagnosis helped ensure that mother–daughter relationships would remain strong, or even improve. Fathers’ attentiveness to mothers was pivotal in determining positive and negative attributes in daughters’ own intimate relationships.

Research implications

Based on the findings from this study, family scientists and healthcare professionals may have a better understanding of the patients’ young adult daughters’ concerns throughout breast cancer treatment and follow up.

Practical implications

Daughters may be at a loss when their mothers are diagnosed with breast cancer. Healthcare professionals can be equipped to recognize these signs when meeting with patients and families, offer suggestions for family members’ coping, and encourage daughters to consider their own breast cancer risk and screening.

Value

This study will provide a new insight into the experiences of daughters of women with breast cancer, and help family and health professionals understand how to support the relatives of breast cancer patients.

Details

Family and Health: Evolving Needs, Responsibilities, and Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-126-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Brenda Bertrand, Carrie Livingston-Bowen, Christopher Duffrin and Amanda Mann

According to Joint Commission standards, patients should be educated about drug-nutrient interactions. Because nurses are well-suited to educating patients, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

According to Joint Commission standards, patients should be educated about drug-nutrient interactions. Because nurses are well-suited to educating patients, this paper aims to assess their knowledge of ACE inhibitor drugs, nutrient interactions and high- and low-potassium foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Licensed nurses from a teaching hospital in the US south eastern Atlantic region completed a self-administered questionnaire (n=83). Means, standard deviations and 95 percent confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data and frequency and percentage distribution for discrete data. Student's t-test was used to evaluate responses by ACE inhibitor patient load and nursing education.

Findings

Mean nurse knowledge of ACE inhibitors and potassium was 62±16 percent and identifying high- and low-potassium foods was 32±23 percent. Most identified five from 12 high-potassium foods and did not know the designation of six, one from 14 low-potassium foods and did not know the designation of 11. Knowledge scores and identifying high- and low-potassium foods were similar regardless of ACE inhibitor patient load and nursing education.

Practical implications

ACE inhibitors are the fourth most commonly used drug class in the USA. Nurses are well positioned to recognize potential drug-nutrient interactions owing to changing or adding a drug, dose delivery method, dietary change or a patient's physical or clinical status that may indicate nutrient deficiency. The findings suggest that the nurses surveyed were proficient in identifying ACE inhibitors pharmacology, but that most were unable to identify foods that increase drug-nutrient interaction risk, and thus this is an area in which additional training might be beneficial.

Originality/value

Case menus were used to portray real-life scenarios in which healthcare practitioners can provide patient education about ACE inhibitor drug and dietary potassium interactions.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Amanda Cooper, Stephen MacGregor and Samantha Shewchuk

This scoping review utilizes findings from 80 articles to build a research model to study research-practice-policy networks in K-12 education systems. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This scoping review utilizes findings from 80 articles to build a research model to study research-practice-policy networks in K-12 education systems. The purpose of this study was to generate a broad understanding of the variation in conceptualizations of research-practice-policy partnerships, rather than dominant conceptualizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Arskey and O'Malley's (2005) five stage scoping review process was utilized including: (1) a consultative process with partners to identify research questions, (2) identify relevant studies, (3) study selection based on double-blind peer review, (4) charting the data and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting the results in a research model identifying key dimensions and components of research-practice partnerships (RPPs).

Findings

Coburn et al. (2013) definition of RPPs arose as an anchoring definition within the emerging field. This article proposes a model for understanding the organization and work of RPPs arising from the review. At the core lies shared goals, coproduction and multistakeholder collaboration organized around three dimensions: (1) Systems and structures: funding, governance, strategic roles, policy environment, system alignment; (2) Collaborative processes: improvement planning and data use, communication, trusting relationships, brokering activities, capacity building; (3) Continuous Learning Cycles: social innovation, implementation, evaluation and adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

By using a common framework, data across RPPs and from different studies can be compared. Research foci might test links between elements such as capacity building and impacts, or test links between systems and structures and how those elements influence collaborative processes and the impact of the RPPs. Research could test the generalizability of the framework across contexts. Through the application and use of the research model, various elements might be refuted, confirmed or refined. More work is needed to use this framework to study RPPs, and to develop accompanying data collection methods and instruments for each dimension and element.

Practical implications

The practical applications of the framework are to be used by RPPs as a learning framework for strategic planning, iterative learning cycles and evaluation. Many of the elements of the framework could be used to check-in with partners on how things are going – such as exploring how communication is working and whether these structures move beyond merely updates and reporting toward joint problem-solving. The framework could also be used prior to setting up an RPP as an organizing approach to making decisions about how that RPP might best operate.

Originality/value

Despite increased attention on multistakeholder networks in education, the conceptual understanding is still limited. This article analyzed theoretical and empirical work to build a systematic model to study RPPs in education. This research model can be used to: identify RPP configurations, analyze the impact of RPPs, and to compare similarities and differences across configurations.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Amanda Budde-Sung and Tanya A. Peacock

This paper aims to build upon climato-economic theory to investigate the issue of climate’s effect on foreign expansion and location choice.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to build upon climato-economic theory to investigate the issue of climate’s effect on foreign expansion and location choice.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical paper looks at foreign subsidiary location through the lens of the climato-economic theory. To do this, the study uses a balanced data set, looking at foreign expansion before, during and after the global financial crisis of US multinational firms. A multilevel step-wise regression is used to look at climate, culture and economic effects on foreign location choice.

Findings

The findings suggest that US multinational enterprises tend to have fewer foreign subsidiaries in countries with extreme climates, and they prefer locations with warmer climates, avoiding locations with colder climates, although they gravitate toward locations with less sunshine. Climate emerges as an important factor in location choice, with greater weighting than other factors, including economic and cultural factors in times of economic calm, but the weightings of the factors change during times of economic crisis.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the global business literature by extending the climate-economic theory to macro levels affecting the firm. The paper is the first to look specifically at how climate affects foreign subsidiary location.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate the scholar–practitioner research development scale (SPRDS), an instrument to assess research competencies of students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate the scholar–practitioner research development scale (SPRDS), an instrument to assess research competencies of students enrolled in professional doctoral programs.

Design/methodology/approach

In this instrument development study, an expert panel established the content valid. A factor analysis and internal consistency analysis was used to examine the validity and reliability of the instrument.

Findings

An expert panel deemed the scale as content valid. Results of a factor analysis and internal consistency analysis demonstrated that the scale is both valid and reliable, consisting of five subscales.

Research limitations/implications

The current study provides evidence that the scholar–SPRDS is a valid and reliable instrument to assess research characteristics professional doctorate students’ research competencies, which can be used to extend research on the development of doctoral students in professional doctorate programs.

Practical implications

The instrument can be a useful tool to assess and inform the faculty and administrators about their students, the curriculum and program resources.

Social implications

Equipped with an instrument such as this, faculty and administrators are better armed to assess students’ growth thought out the program, and, in turn, design and deliver research curriculum and mentorship that assists students in developing as scholar–practitioners, which may ultimately lead to success in the program and beyond, impacting the society.

Originality/value

There is not a formal or standardized scale to evaluate if professional doctoral students are progressing and developing as practitioner-scholars through their professional doctoral programs. There is not a standardized or universally adopted assessment to determine if professional doctoral programs are meeting the goals and objectives they have set forth. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop and to determine the validity and reliability of a scale to measure a scholar–practitioner’s research competencies in a professional doctoral program.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Guilherme Tortorella, Desirée H. van Dun and Amanda Gundes de Almeida

The purpose of this paper is to examine leadership behaviors associated with lean healthcare (LH) implementation and how they develop throughout the change process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine leadership behaviors associated with lean healthcare (LH) implementation and how they develop throughout the change process.

Design/methodology/approach

After a systematic literature review of 107 peer-reviewed articles on lean leaders’ behaviors, the authors undertook a one-year mixed-methods study of 12 leaders within a Brazilian public hospital undergoing LH implementation. Multivariate data analysis techniques were employed.

Findings

The literature review showed some convergence between effective lean leader behaviors in both manufacturing and healthcare work settings, implying that lean leaders’ behaviors are generalizable to other contexts than manufacturing. The empirical findings suggest that LH implementation needs leaders to demonstrate a set of task-oriented behaviors, especially if short-term results are mandatory. More mature lean leaders should also continue developing their relations-oriented behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

While the contingency theory assumes that contexts influence (lean) practices adoption, leadership behaviors may not be bound to the work context. The finding resembles the augmentation effect of leadership whereby more mature lean leaders adopt both task- and relations-oriented behaviors.

Originality/value

Longitudinal studies in this field are scarce, regardless of the industrial setting. Many manufacturing and healthcare organizations crave for knowledge about lean leader behaviors throughout the lean implementation journey in order to enhance the effectiveness of their often-struggling lean initiatives. The insights derived from this study could help organizations to adjust their expectations as well as identify behavioral gaps and needs in terms of soft skills development among their leaders.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Diana C. Sisson and Shannon A. Bowen

Following a report released by the UK Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee, multinational corporations like Starbucks, Google, and Amazon found themselves in a firestorm…

Abstract

Purpose

Following a report released by the UK Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee, multinational corporations like Starbucks, Google, and Amazon found themselves in a firestorm of criticism for not paying or paying minimal taxes after earning significant profits in the UK for the past three years. Allegations of tax evasion led to a serious crisis for Starbucks in the UK, which played out in a public forum via social media. The researchers explored whether Starbucks’ corporate ethics insulated its reputation from negative media coverage of alleged tax evasion evidenced in its “hijacked” social media “#spreadthecheer” campaign. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an exploratory case study analysis of news articles, Starbucks’ annual reports, #spreadthecheer Tweets, and David Michelli’s The Starbucks Experience, data collection helped to inform the discussion of authenticity and whether it helped to insulate Starbucks’ reputation during its crisis in the UK.

Findings

Authenticity is key when organizations face a turbulent environment and active publics and stakeholder groups. Findings from this study also suggested proactive reputation management strategies and tactics, grounded in the organization’s corporate culture and transparency, could have diffused some of the uproar from its key publics.

Originality/value

Authentic corporate cultures should align with corporate business practices in order to reduce the potential for crises to occur. It is possible that ethical core values and a strong organizational approach to ethics help to insulate its reputation among publics during a crisis.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 37