Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Alyson Byrne, Ingrid C. Chadwick and Amanda J. Hancock

The purpose of this paper is to examine female leaders' attitudes toward demand-side strategies to close the gender-leadership gap and discuss implications for organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine female leaders' attitudes toward demand-side strategies to close the gender-leadership gap and discuss implications for organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes the process of knowledge co-creation that took place using an engaged scholarship epistemology over 23 interviews with North American women in senior leadership roles.

Findings

Five key themes related to women leaders' attitudes toward demand-side strategies are discussed. Some felt uncertain or opposed toward these strategies, whereas others supported them. Support for these strategies was dependent on perceptions of backlash regarding the implementation of these strategies and the participants' career stage. Finally, participants acknowledged that demand-side strategies are insufficient in isolation and require additional organizational supports.

Research limitations/implications

These findings enhance our understanding and provide theoretical refinement of the mechanisms that drive female leaders' reactions to demand-side strategies to close the gender-leadership gap.

Practical implications

Participants advocated for certain practices to be considered when organizations contemplate the adoption of demand-side strategies. Importantly, participants advocated that the implementation of demand-side strategies would be insufficient unless organizations encourage greater dialogue regarding the gender-leadership gap, that top management support more gender inclusive leadership, and that male colleagues act as allies for women in leadership.

Originality/value

This article extends past research and theory by integrating the pragmatic perspectives of successful female leaders with previous empirical evidence to illustrate different reactions to demand-side strategies and ways for organizations to manage those in their efforts to close the gender-leadership gap.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Downloads
287

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Women currently in leadership roles believe that demand-side strategies are best placed at changing the current gender imbalance in leadership roles across the board.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Jennifer L. Robertson and Julian Barling

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from two studies that compare the nature (construct validity) and relative effects (incremental predictive validity) of…

Downloads
1053

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from two studies that compare the nature (construct validity) and relative effects (incremental predictive validity) of environmentally specific transformational leadership (ETFL) to general transformational leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The nature of ETFL was investigated in an empirical study based on a sample of 185 employees. The relative effects of ETFL were examined in an experimental study based on a sample of 155 university students.

Findings

A confirmatory factor analysis showed that environmentally specific and general transformational leadership are empirically distinct but related. Findings from the experimental study revealed that compared to general transformational leadership and a control condition, participants exposed to ETFL he confederate leader’s environmental values and priorities more highly and engaged in higher levels of pro-environmental behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Questions concerning ecological and external validity arise out of the experimental study. Future research should contrast the relative effects of environmentally specific and general transformational leadership across various organizational and cultural conditions. Limitations associated with demand characteristics are also of concern in the experimental study. Future research should include an environmental focus in the control condition to exclude any possible threats related to demand characteristics.

Practical implications

Results from these two studies provide useful information regarding within-organization environmental leadership training by suggesting that maximal individual and organizational environmental change may best be achieved by training leaders to be as specific as possible regarding their values, priorities and goals.

Social implications

This research suggests that leaders should engage in ETFL behaviors to have the greatest positive impact on corporate environmental sustainability, and by extension, climate change.

Originality/value

In two separate studies, the construct and incremental predictive validity of ETFL were assessed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2016

Raina Elise Fox

In this paper, I apply the discourse of transitional justice to the case study of survivor docents at the Japanese American National Museum, a site that has come to…

Abstract

In this paper, I apply the discourse of transitional justice to the case study of survivor docents at the Japanese American National Museum, a site that has come to represent and serve as a form of reparation for the traumatic memory of Japanese American internment during World War II. As a longer term supplement to trials or Truth and Reconciliation Commissions or an alternative in cases where no such structures exist, I illustrate how the museum tour becomes an empowering platform for survivors of the American Internment camps to work through and instrumentalize traumatic memories within the dialogic museum sphere, even as this alternative space forms its own new silences. Thus, by applying the very theories and criticisms through which scholars of memory politics evaluate official platforms of transitional justice, I aim to complicate and evaluate this alternative form of testimony, and in so doing explore areas of growth in the fields of both transitional justice and museum practice. Bridging the gap between testimony, oral history, and museum interpretation, survivor docents represent a sustained dialogic approach to history that perpetuates, preserves, and activates – rather than resolves – discourse around contentious memories.

Details

Narratives of Identity in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-078-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Daniel Mason, Stacy-Lynn Sant and Brian Soebbing

The purpose of this paper is to examine how North American professional team owners are engaging in broader urban development projects that have their teams as anchor…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how North American professional team owners are engaging in broader urban development projects that have their teams as anchor tenants in new sports facilities, by examining the case of Rogers Arena in Edmonton, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Approached from a constructionist perspective, the study employed an instrumental case study strategy as it facilitates understanding and description of a particular phenomenon and allows researchers to use the case as a comparative point across other settings (with similar conditions) in which the phenomenon might be present.

Findings

Using urban regime theory as a framework, the authors found that in Edmonton, the team owner was able to align his interests with other political and business interests by engaging in a development strategy that increased the vibrancy of Edmonton’s downtown core. As a result, the owner was able to garner support for both the arena and the surrounding development.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that this new model of team owner as developer has several implications: on-field performance may only be important insofar as it drives demand for the development; the owner’s focus is on driving revenues and profits from interests outside of the sports facility itself; and the team (and the threat of relocation) is leveraged to gain master developer status for the ownership group.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the understanding of owner interests and how franchise profitability and solvency can be tied to other related business interests controlled by team owners.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5