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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Stephen E. Bear and Alvin Hwang

This paper aims to examine how employee perceptions of organizational context relate to willingness to mentor. This research will help organizations to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how employee perceptions of organizational context relate to willingness to mentor. This research will help organizations to understand the relationship between organizational context and willingness to mentor to encourage mentoring.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey approach. Employees who worked in the development, production and marketing of pharmaceuticals were administered a survey questionnaire. Data were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings showed that the downsizing experience was negatively related to willingness to mentor, and the threat of being downsized was negatively related to perceived organizational support. In contrast, perceived organizational support was positively related to organization-based self-esteem, which, in turn, was positively related to willingness to mentor.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between perceived organizational support and organization-based self-esteem, with its subsequent positive effect on willingness to mentor, indicates the importance of organizations’ providing their employees with needed organizational support. Conversely, the negative relationship between the downsizing experience and willingness to mentor, and the threat of being downsized and perceived organizational support, indicates the need to separate mentoring programs from downsizing events even if it means delaying the initiation of a mentoring programs.

Originality/value

Research on the impact of organizational context on willingness to mentor is limited, and this study helps to address that gap.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

J. Ben Arbaugh, Alvin Hwang, Jeffrey J. McNally, Charles J. Fornaciari and Lisa A. Burke-Smalley

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and experiential learning), along with their citation sources to draw insights on their support and legitimacy bases, with lessons on improving such support and legitimacy for the streams and the wider BME research field.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the nature of three BME research streams and their citation sources through tests of differences across streams.

Findings

The three streams differ in research foci and approaches such as the use of managerial samples in experiential learning, quantitative studies in online/blended education and literature reviews in entrepreneurship education. They also differ in sources of legitimacy recognition and avenues for mobilization of support. The underlying literature development pattern of the experiential learning stream indicates a need for BME scholars to identify and build on each other’s work.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of different research bases and key supporting literature in the different streams shows important core articles that are useful to build research in each stream.

Practical implications

Readers will understand the different research bases supporting the three research streams, along with their targeted audience and practice implications.

Social implications

The discovery of different support bases for the three different streams helps identify the network of authors and relationships that have been built in each stream.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to uncover differences in nature and citation sources of the three continuously growing BME research streams with recommendations on ways to improve the support of the three streams.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Alvin Hwang

Outdoor experiential activities, commonly referred to as adventure learning (AL), have been useful in improving teamwork. This study shows the impact of AL on teamwork…

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3987

Abstract

Outdoor experiential activities, commonly referred to as adventure learning (AL), have been useful in improving teamwork. This study shows the impact of AL on teamwork attitudes that are moderated by two competitive attitudes – the first, Kiasu‐positive (an attitude of diligence that directed effort towards work so as to get ahead of others) led to smaller teamwork attitudinal improvements, while the second, Kiasu‐negative (an attitude that is focussed on preventing others from getting ahead of oneself), led to larger teamwork attitudinal improvements. These competitive attitudes were also examined for their relationships with collectivism and pace of work.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Alvin Hwang, Regina Bento and J.B. (Ben) Arbaugh

The purpose of this study is to examine factors that predict industry‐level career change among MBA graduates.

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2204

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine factors that predict industry‐level career change among MBA graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzed longitudinal data from the Management Education Research Institute (MERI)'s Global MBA Graduate Survey Dataset and MBA Alumni Perspectives Survey Datasets, using principal component analyses and a three‐stage structural equations model.

Findings

Perceptions about career growth and opportunity for advancement were the strongest predictors of industry shifts. The type of program was also found to have an influence, with part‐time MBA programs positively predicting industry shift, and full‐time programs having an indirect effect through significant associations with each of the intermediate predictors of industry shifts. Women were found to be more likely to change industries. Satisfaction with the MBA degree was not a predictor of industry change behavior: they were found to be related only to the extent that graduates valued the importance of certain career factors, such as the objective career factor of career growth.

Originality/value

This is a first large scale study of industry‐level career change among MBA graduates.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

What organization would not want staff who could work well as a team, who could get on well with their colleagues, and who would support each other and who pooled their…

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696

Abstract

What organization would not want staff who could work well as a team, who could get on well with their colleagues, and who would support each other and who pooled their skills, knowledge and effort into the common cause of the enterprise’s success? Silly question maybe. After all, the only reason any workforce is a “force” at all, or why any establishment of employees is established in the first place is to work as a unit for the good of the business. Or is it? The answer, of course, is undoubtedly “yes” but the question needs asking, and answering, if only to clear up some confusion.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Peter E. Swift and Alvin Hwang

This paper seeks to add to the research on the role of cognitive and affective trust in promoting knowledge sharing between executives and consequently establishing an…

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5593

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to add to the research on the role of cognitive and affective trust in promoting knowledge sharing between executives and consequently establishing an organizational learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the influence of one conceptualization of trust, one that has two sub‐constructs – affective (emotional) trust and cognitive (rational) trust – on knowledge sharing among 157 marketing and sales executives.

Findings

The results indicate that affective trust is more important than cognitive trust in sharing interpersonal knowledge, but cognitive trust is more important in creating an organizational learning environment.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study was limited to the marketing and sales functions in business to consumer companies. Knowledge sharing is an acute issue in this industry and the results may not be completely applicable to less competitive industries or business functions. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further in other industries and business functions.

Practical implications

The results indicate that organizations should focus on organizational processes which promote both affective and cognitive trust. Such processes include job rotation to improve cognitive understanding and employee screening for affective trust traits.

Originality/value

To date, much of the planned organizational learning efforts have been focused on outside interventions (i.e. training seminars, meetings, etc.) that have value but are limited in their ability to generate sustained levels of trust. To increase knowledge sharing and consequent organizational learning benefits, results of this study indicate that organizations should encourage cognitive and affective trust building endeavours.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Sophie Revillard Kaufman and Alvin Hwang

The purpose of this paper is to develop the mindfulness construct in Thomas’ (2006) cultural intelligence (CQ) model and identify three mindfulness facets based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the mindfulness construct in Thomas’ (2006) cultural intelligence (CQ) model and identify three mindfulness facets based on the mindfulness literature: empathy, open-mindedness and using all senses. Relationships among mindfulness, cross-cultural knowledge and cross-cultural behavioral ability are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of two French banking institutions operating in the USA is used incorporating multiple sources of data: participant observations, primary public and private documentation sources, archival records, secondary data and open-ended interviews with a key informant.

Findings

The two organizations showed similar emphasis on cross-cultural knowledge but differences in cross-cultural behavioral ability. These differences were traced to the posited mindfulness components of empathy, open-mindedness and using all senses.

Research limitations/implications

The two-sample case only provides emerging evidence of the role of mindfulness in linking cross-cultural knowledge to behavioral ability and will require validation through empirical studies to test for significance of relationships among these CQ facets.

Practical implications

Thomas’ (2006) CQ model and the authors’ understanding of its underlying mindfulness components provide insight in predicting cross-cultural potential of employees and designing customized employee training to help organizations meet the needs of a globally diverse workplace.

Social implications

The development of mindfulness qualities should improve interactions among individuals in any organizational setting, with added benefit of bridging cross-cultural differences.

Originality/value

This paper helps extend research on CQ facets using a qualitative method incorporating multiple sources of evidence to explore the mindfulness CQ construct.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Peter E. Swift and Alvin Hwang

This paper seeks to present organizational learning processes of knowledge accumulation, articulation, codification and subsequent routine development in a marketing…

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3132

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present organizational learning processes of knowledge accumulation, articulation, codification and subsequent routine development in a marketing services organization where judgment and rules of thumb were more the norm than codified knowledge and explicit routines. The case illustrates how organizational learning through a conscious knowledge codification effort could lead to tangible benefits for consumer‐driven organizations and how heterogeneous and infrequent yet important routines can be aided by an explicit and dynamic learning process.

Design/methodology/approach

After a review of the relevant literature, a case is provided to illustrate many of the key concepts in the organizational learning literature as they are applied to a consumer package goods company.

Findings

The case study is followed by a discussion of how the organization in the case applied organizational learning processes through a knowledge clarification and codification system. The organizational learning process was enabled by contextual enablers such as leadership commitment to organizational learning, teamwork and organization‐wide participation in the knowledge articulation and codification processes, and multi‐lateral flow of information across the organization in developing the routines.

Practical implications

Implications of how companies in market‐oriented environments that often have nuanced practices and uncodified norms could utilize various organizational learning processes are discussed in the paper.

Originality/value

It is rare in the field of organizational learning to see the application of numerous learning theories in one place and one organization. Such was the case in this examination, where different roles played by different organizational components, such as support from leadership, teamwork and flexibility, organization‐wide participation, and multilateral communication, in addition to knowledge accumulation, articulation, codification, and circular learning loops were utililzed by the organization to produce marketplace success for a major consumer battery company with heterogeneous and nuanced yet important learning requirements.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Alvin Hwang, Naresh Khatri and E.S. Srinivas

This paper aims to examine the extent leadership charisma and vision could be discriminated by followers and how they influenced follower commitment and reported…

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3036

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the extent leadership charisma and vision could be discriminated by followers and how they influenced follower commitment and reported performance across three countries.

Design/methodology/approach

An instrument to identify leadership charisma and vision was developed in Singapore and validated in New Zealand and India before tests on how these leadership qualities influenced followers through Lisrel path models.

Findings

Results from the Singapore sample showed that charisma and vision were made up of two charismatic factors (social sensitivity and personality traits – persuasive) and two visionary factors (expert and analytical and visionary and futuristic). Tests across three countries showed that the two visionary factors influenced reported performance and the two charismatic factors influenced subordinate commitment. Only social sensitivity predicted both performance and commitment of subordinates.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should include a larger sample of respondents. Cross‐cultural differences in vision and charismatic qualities would have to be explicitly tested with cross‐cultural variables in future studies. The performance output measure should also include objective measures of follower performance, such as revenue or cost in future studies.

Practical implications

Effective leaders should strive to have both charismatic and visionary qualities. Special attention should be paid to “socially sensitive” since it influenced both commitment and reported performance.

Originality/value

This instrument was developed and tested across three countries and therefore has some cross‐cultural validity. The clear discrimination between charisma and vision is also an important development that showed the role both played in leadership influence.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Brayden G King, Teppo Felin and David A. Whetten

Comparative organizational analysis once dominated American organizational sociology, grounded in rich case studies about organizational processes and outcomes. The…

Abstract

Comparative organizational analysis once dominated American organizational sociology, grounded in rich case studies about organizational processes and outcomes. The Columbia school's approach to organizational research was exemplary in this regard. Following the publication of Robert K. Merton's (1940) essay, “Bureaucratic Structure and Personality,” he attracted a group of talented doctoral students to his formal organizations seminar (Crothers, 1990), the core of whom would go on to write dissertations, books, and articles forming the substance of American organizational sociology in the decades to come. Among those students were Philip Selznick, Alvin Gouldner, Peter Blau, Seymour Martin Lipset, Rose Coser, and James Coleman. While their work varied greatly in substantive content, their studies shared a theoretical interest in explaining intra-organizational dynamics and the unexpected outcomes of bureaucratic administration. Organizations, they demonstrated, developed “lives of their own,” quite outside the intents of their founders (Haveman, 2009; refer, especially, Selznick, 1957). Organizations, in other words, were adaptive to the needs of their constituents, but adaptations did not always produce the intended results. One of the unintended consequences of organizational development was increasing variety in the kinds of organizations that emerged to meet particular societal goals or ends. Thus, an inherent focus of this early comparative research was the explanation of variety in organizational types, policies, and outcomes and an emphasis on the ways in which organizations diverged from ideal types.

Details

Studying Differences between Organizations: Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-647-8

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