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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 23 June 2018

Abdur Rafik and Anjar Priyono

The purpose of this study is to explore and decompose a satisfaction model using alumni’s perspective for Islamic-based higher education institutions (IHEI) with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore and decompose a satisfaction model using alumni’s perspective for Islamic-based higher education institutions (IHEI) with the antecedent of perceived quality and value and the consequence of loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A study was used, using 44-item, a ten-point Likert-scale questionnaire administered to 360 alumni from various classes started from the 1970s till 2000s. Theoretical-based, national qualification framework of Indonesian higher education and management-based considerations were involved in developing a survey. Data were analyzed using partial least square-structural equation model and decomposed into strategic management map using importance-performance matrix analysis.

Findings

The most important determinants of alumni satisfaction and loyalty in IHEI is the IHEI’s ability to develop career capability through enriching knowledge. Moreover, the presence of good environment and Islamic value embodiment supporting learning programs on campus is the most significant trigger for the knowledge development.

Research limitations/implications

The results were generated from a specific department. Additional studies are needed to test if the results are not department (institution)-specific.

Practical implications

This study provides strategic directions for management to improve the critical aspects of the system by providing the inputs to the extent to which the service quality delivered may contribute to end-customers’ satisfaction.

Originality/value

It contributes to the literature on satisfaction and service quality issues by incorporating ideological aspect, by investigating the feasible model of customer satisfaction in the perspective of alumni for IHEI.

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Yazid Mati

Higher education is a complex system that involves multiple inputs and outputs, where various activities and processes are performed. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education is a complex system that involves multiple inputs and outputs, where various activities and processes are performed. The purpose of this paper is to monitor the input resources used for executing various activities of higher education institutions. These resources are classified into three types: human resources, physical resources and financial resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The author examines various national and international accreditation standards to determine their requirements for key performance indicators (KPIs) to monitor input resources. Moreover, the author uses implications proposed by previous research and best practices.

Findings

A set of appropriate and generic KPIs is developed for each type of these resources leading to a total of 72 key indicators. These indicators are easy to measure, which makes them practical to be adopted by a large scale of institutions.

Practical implications

The proposed indicators provide adequate information to administrators and policy-makers, accrediting bodies and stakeholders to identify the progress and achievements. These indicators are also used for benchmarking purposes by comparing the institution’s performance against their comparable institutions counterparts. Moreover, they are used for marketing purposes to commercialize the institution by attracting prospective students and teaching faculty in addition to increasing current students’ satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper gives special attention to developing a set of generic KPIs for assessing the availability and quality of input resources used for carrying out various activities of higher education institutions for the aim of improving their performance and hence helping them comply with the requirements of accreditation standards.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Achutha Jois and Somnath Chakrabarti

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond…

Abstract

Purpose

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond its geographical boundaries into the global arena. This study aims to identify key constructs, their theoretical background and dimensions that aid in building a global knowledge brand. The authors' research focuses on adapting and validating scales for global knowledge and education services brands from well-established academic literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have adopted a mixed methodology approach and a systematic literature review. Authors interviewed 18 subject matter experts as part of content and face validity to arrive at select constructs, dimensions and items. Quantitative methods with random sampling were adopted as the primary methodology. Initially, the survey was administered to 390 students to test preliminary results. The survey was also administered to 5,112 students at a later part of this study. Valid responses stood at 3,244 with a 63% response rate. Further, the authors conducted confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test the reliability and validity of scales. This study analyzed composite reliability, convergent validity and discriminant validity to finalize items for scales. The authors also validated the hypotheses based on the discriminant validity assessment scores.

Findings

Authors' key research findings are that academic stimulus, campus infrastructure and student intent play a significant role in campus culture and events design and experience at campus. Authors were able to bring out 16 key constructs and 55 critical dimensions vital to global education services brand building. This study also adapted and validated 99 items that meet construct validity and composite reliability criteria. This study also highlights that constructs such as student intent, academic stimulus, campus infrastructure scalability, selection mechanism, pedagogical content knowledge, brand identity, events experience and campus culture play a vital role in global brand recognition.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' work is fairly generalizable to education services and the higher education sector. However, this study must be extrapolated and empirically validated in other industry sectors. The research implications of this study are that it aided the authors in building theoretical background for student brand loyalty theory, student expectation theory and study loyalty theory. This study adds to the body of knowledge by contributing to theoretical concepts on students, knowledge culture, events, infrastructure and branding. Researchers can adopt the scales proposed in this study to build research models in higher education branding. This study acts as a catalyst for building theories in education services areas. Researchers can delve deep into proposed research aspects of campus infrastructure, knowledge infrastructure, campus knowledge culture, events design and events experience.

Practical implications

This study aids educators and brand managers to develop global education services and optimize their effort and budget. Administrators in the education services sector must focus on practical aspects of student perception, campus infrastructure, culture and events experience. Practically administrators can reorient their efforts based on this study to achieve global brand recognition.

Social implications

This study highlights that students are not customers but are co-creators of value in the education sector. This study provides scales and dimensions needed to build co-creation frameworks and models.

Originality/value

Most research in higher education branding has not covered wider aspects of global brand building. Existing theories proposed in higher education and education services articles cover only narrower aspects of campus infrastructure, culture, events design and branding. This study presents a comprehensive list of critical factors that play a vital role in global knowledge brand building. This study highlights the constructs and scales integral to building a global education services brand.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Syed Aziz Anwar, M. Sadiq Sohail and Meera Al-Marri

It has been argued in the literature that quality assurance is a relative concept. In view of the new challenges (and opportunities) created by e-learning institutions in…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been argued in the literature that quality assurance is a relative concept. In view of the new challenges (and opportunities) created by e-learning institutions in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, this paper aims to explore the dimensions of quality assurance in e-learning and test the psychometric properties of the underlying dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential mixed methods approach was applied in this study. In the qualitative phase, items were generated using the inductive and deductive approaches. This was then followed by the quantitative phase where data was collected from 275 senior academics, scholars and administrators associated with e-learning institutions in Kuwait, UAE and Saudi Arabia.

Findings

The findings of this study revealed that e-learning quality assurance is a multidimensional construct. The dimensions of accreditation, assessment, accountability and benchmarking were identified. Further, the model demonstrated adequacy in its validity and reliability.

Practical implications

In the light of proliferation of e-learning courses in GCC countries, the results of this are invaluable to enable administrators and instructors to design strategy and foster innovation in the domain of quality assurance. E-learning institutions operating in a competitive environment have to design and implement an effective strategy to achieve innovation, uniqueness and diversity in the educational sector of their countries.

Originality/value

This paper has successfully validated an e-learning quality assurance questionnaire, which can be used effectively for evaluating e-learning programmes.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Carla Guevara and Scott Stewart

This research study seeks to identify what graduating students and alumni perceive to be of most value in courses, and in turn the relationship of those perceptions with…

877

Abstract

Purpose

This research study seeks to identify what graduating students and alumni perceive to be of most value in courses, and in turn the relationship of those perceptions with the information in evaluations conducted by students at the conclusion of courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The project involves empirical research utilizing standard student course evaluation data, and rigorous matching alumni survey data. A focus group, as well as prior academic research, informs the design.

Findings

There are several key conclusions from this study comparing student and alumni perceptions of course satisfaction. Consistent with end‐of‐program survey and focus group observations, career relevance clearly grows with time in importance for determining course satisfaction. Career relevance is not a statistically significant factor for course satisfaction using end‐of‐course student survey responses, but grows to a statistically significant determinant utilizing alumni survey data, larger than both the extent of learning and instructor performance; moreover, instructor performance appears to become less important.

Research limitations/implications

While survey responses for individuals as both students and alumni cannot be linked in this study, the high response rate of alumni and the pooling of data suggest results are robust.

Practical implications

If instructors want students, once they become alumni, to be satisfied with their course experience, they need to teach material which will be truly useful in their careers, even if students do not fully appreciate it during class. And if university presidents want satisfied alumni, they need to ensure their school's curriculum includes material that may be applied in the real world, and that the measures of teaching effectiveness utilized for compensation purposes do not stress too highly traditional measures of student satisfaction.

Social implications

Educators can provide students with a more long‐term satisfying educational experience by ensuring curriculum includes practical material that is truly relevant for careers.

Originality/value

Student evaluations have been commonly used in determining the success of a course, and the effectiveness of their instructors. However, there has only been limited analysis of student evaluations as a measure of what matters most – the benefit to the student once they graduate and move into the working world. Empirical results based on student and alumni survey data identify differences in perceptions between students and alumni, and suggest key recommendations for both instructors and university administrators.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Jeffrey W. Alstete

Association‐sponsored benchmarking programs are developed, organized, and implemented by a professional association of member institutions. Methods used often include…

Abstract

Association‐sponsored benchmarking programs are developed, organized, and implemented by a professional association of member institutions. Methods used often include survey‐type data collection instruments or traditional benchmarking strategies with site visits. These types of programs can be effective tools for identifying and adapting best practices at relatively low cost for association members while generating revenue for the association. However, association benchmarking programs must be carefully planned, properly promoted, implemented in timely manner, and effectively reported to members in order to be successful.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Yehuda Baruch and Katherine J.C. Sang

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model to examine factors influencing the inclination of MBA graduates to donate to their alma mater.

1097

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model to examine factors influencing the inclination of MBA graduates to donate to their alma mater.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a large data‐base of 3,677 MBA graduates to evaluate individual factors, and external evaluation of organizational level factors. The authors constructed and tested the model, finding strong support for its validity.

Findings

Satisfaction with the MBA, university prestige and salary were significant predictors of donating behavior. Engagement (operationalised volunteering) was a significant mediating factor between these factors and donating behaviour.

Originality/value

The paper adds to both theoretical implication for understanding long‐term relationships between graduates and their alma mater and to managerial implication for future financing of universities and business schools in particular.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Ariunaa Enkhtur

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Mongolian alumni of three different scholarship programs sponsored by governments of Japan and Mongolia view their role in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Mongolian alumni of three different scholarship programs sponsored by governments of Japan and Mongolia view their role in national development after graduation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports findings from a phenomenological study (Creswell, 2007) – the first phase of an exploratory sequential mixed-methods study in a recent PhD study. Based on semi-structured interviews with 24 alumni the study aimed to understand alumni’s perspectives in their voices.

Findings

Alumni were motivated to contribute to their communities, institutions, economic, political, social and legal conditions of Mongolia. However, they faced various structural challenges including getting jobs in the public sector even when they had binding agreements with employers. The findings call for long-term support for alumni projects and hubs as well as policy frameworks that tie the scholarship programs with national development goals.

Originality/value

Despite the high mobility rate of Mongolian scholars and a long history of Japanese Official Development Assistance to develop human resources in developing countries especially in Asia, little is known about the impact of these programs on the Mongolian national development. Through the phenomenological study, this study expands the understanding of ways in which alumni contribute to their national development.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Sara Carter and Elaine Collinson

This paper is concerned with the retrospective perceptions of alumni towards the general provision of entrepreneurship education in higher education institutions (HEIs)…

1690

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the retrospective perceptions of alumni towards the general provision of entrepreneurship education in higher education institutions (HEIs). Whilst many HEIs provide some form of enterprise training for their student population, relatively few have considered extending this provision to their alumni community. In addition to exploring retrospective perceptions, the research sought to ascertain the current level of entrepreneurial behaviour and the future entrepreneurial ambitions of alumni, and attempted to determine the demand for post‐qualification entrepreneurship training among HEI alumni. The results are encouraging, in that they demonstrate a keen interest amongst alumni in entrepreneurial activities. The main constraints to setting up in business were perceived to be the generation of a viable idea and the lack of both finance and experience. Respondents believed that HEIs should provide a more practical grounding for graduates, specifically citing financial management and business communications skills as key elements missing from the undergraduate curriculum. There was a consensus that HEIs have an important role to play in providing alumni with both formal post‐qualification training and social support networks to encourage entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Sajjad Rehman and Laila Marouf

This study aims to analyze the perceptions of the graduates of Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) program at Kuwait University about coursework, faculty…

601

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the perceptions of the graduates of Master in Library and Information Science (MLIS) program at Kuwait University about coursework, faculty, instructional methods, instructional facilities, fieldwork, comprehensive examination, and research component.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was used for electronic administration. Eighty graduates of the MLIS program of Kuwait University were identified as population of the study. Sixty‐seven alumni (86.3 per cent) participated in the survey.

Findings

Based on the analysis of 61 usable responses, it was found that the faculty and core courses received highest mean scores for satisfaction whereas elective coursework, fieldwork, and comprehensive examinations received the lowest. Qualitative analysis of the participants revealed that the alumni wished broadening the breadth of the elective coursework and fundamental changes in fieldwork and comprehensive examination. Many of them were quite critical of instructional methods and facilities.

Research limitations/implications

Results cannot be generalized to other graduate programs. Yet, these provide procedural guidance and insights about the way these studies of perception can be conducted.

Practical implications

This input can be meaningfully applied in further development of the MLIS program.

Originality/value

It is original research that carries value for the assessment of graduate programs of library and information studies.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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