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Article

Jessica V. Linley and Keith L. Warren

Aftercare is an important predictor of outcomes following treatment for substance abuse. Despite this, there is evidence that the great majority of substance abusing…

Abstract

Purpose

Aftercare is an important predictor of outcomes following treatment for substance abuse. Despite this, there is evidence that the great majority of substance abusing clients choose not to participate in aftercare. Aftercare programs that are tied to specific residential treatment facilities, sometimes known as alumni groups or alumni clubs, might increase participation by offering former residents the opportunity to maintain treatment oriented social networks. Therapeutic communities (TCs), which emphasize mutual aid between residents, are ideal candidates for such programs. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 100 randomly chosen former TC residents were randomly surveyed regarding their contact with fellow alumni and their exchange of recovery oriented helping behaviors. A thirty day timeline follow-back methodology was used.

Findings

Contact was primarily through electronic means, particularly phone calls, texts and the alumni club Facebook page. Participants who reported more electronic contact also reported more days in which they offered and received recovery oriented help. Participants who were African American or had spent more time in TC treatment offered and received recovery oriented help on more days.

Research limitations/implications

While this is an exploratory study limited to one TC, this alumni club allows for the maintenance of a mutual aid network after termination. That network primarily consists of electronic forms of contact. A longer time spent in TC treatment may allow for the internalization of the practice of mutual aid. Further research on alumni clubs is warranted.

Originality/value

This is the first survey of TC alumni club members.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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Book part

Matteo Landoni, Daniela Bolzani and Alessandro Baroncelli

This chapter provides insights into the activities carried out by alumni in the domain of academic entrepreneurship. Given the increasing role of alumni in the support to

Abstract

This chapter provides insights into the activities carried out by alumni in the domain of academic entrepreneurship. Given the increasing role of alumni in the support to entrepreneurial learning in universities and the scant evidence about their actual engagement into these initiatives, it explores the alumni organisations affiliated to the population of 58 alumni organisations in 55 higher education institutions (HEI) in Italy, particularly for the activities designed to support entrepreneurship. The authors explore and define services related to entrepreneurship for and from the alumni. Among others, alumni organisations or clubs help members in accessing networks with their peers for career opportunities and role modelling. The authors contribute to the increasing literature about the entrepreneurial university by documenting the activities carried out by alumni organisations to foster entrepreneurship at their parent HEI and promoting an entrepreneurial ecosystem. Universities must take into consideration that peer support can be as important for spreading entrepreneurial initiatives within universities as other more formal supporting measures.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Article

Steve Worthington and Suzanne Horne

The credit card industry in the UK has a growing number of affinitycards, some of which are specifically aimed at the alumni ofuniversities. Discusses the evolution of the…

Abstract

The credit card industry in the UK has a growing number of affinity cards, some of which are specifically aimed at the alumni of universities. Discusses the evolution of the relationship between the university alumni officers and the credit card issuers responsible for the alumni affinity cards. Bases the research on a five‐phase model of relationship formation and describes how the alumni officers perceive their relationship with their affinity card issuers through the phases of awareness, exploration, expansion, commitment and dissolution. Concludes that the entry of the affinity card issuer potentially dilutes the strength of the relationship between the alumni and their university, as the card issuer seeks to build a direct relationship with the alumni affinity cardholders. Alumni officers and others responsible for initiating affinity credit card agreements, therefore, need to be aware of both the benefits and costs of establishing and maintaining relationships with affinity credit card issuers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Abstract

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Leadership of Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-204-9

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Article

James Austin and V. Kasturi Rangan

This paper aims to reflect on 25 years of the social enterprise initiative at the Harvard Business School, examining the processes and thinking involved at key stages of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reflect on 25 years of the social enterprise initiative at the Harvard Business School, examining the processes and thinking involved at key stages of this pioneering Initiative’s implementation and institutionalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an auto-ethnographical approach, reflexively considering the impact of our actions at key stages.

Findings

Reflecting on the experiences, the authors offer their thoughts on the challenges involved in establishing an educational program. They consider that there were give stages in the development of the program, which ensured its longevity, institutionalization and success: giving birth; starting an experiment; gaining acceptability; being embraced and achieving irreversibility.

Practical implications

The multiple challenges faced, as well as the successes that the authors had over the years, are set out. Awareness of the challenges that the authors faced will support educators to be prepared to overcome the same or similar challenges to implementing and embedding a social enterprise program.

Originality/value

This is the first time that the authors’ reflections on the history of the Social Enterprise Initiative have been brought together. As well as distinctive in their own right, the authors consider that the lessons learned from the work over such a long period could provide valuable insights to those who wish to integrate social enterprise teaching into their settings.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article

Jayne M. Godfrey and Peter J. Godfrey

This paper describes the extent to which Australian university alumni offices currently apply benchmarking principles. Not surprisingly, there is considerable diversity in…

Abstract

This paper describes the extent to which Australian university alumni offices currently apply benchmarking principles. Not surprisingly, there is considerable diversity in the way that the offices measure, evaluate, and progress their operations. Benchmarking has been adopted by only half of the respondents to a survey of management practices. To some extent, the differences reflect differences in alumni officers’ perceptions of the primacy of various customer groups, and the extent to which the top echelons of the universities advocate quality management practices. Resource constraints and concerns about meeting target performance measures are key deterrents to the adoption of benchmarking. Those associations that adopt benchmarking out‐perform those that do not on the following dimensions: commitment to quality management practices; communication with employees; continuous improvement, emphasis on customer satisfaction; and participative management. Organisations that have adopted quality management principles vary according to how they implement benchmarking, including the types of benchmarking partners adopted.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Amber L. Stephenson and David B. Yerger

As colleges and universities face the shifts of decreasing government funds, increased operating costs, and waning alumni financial support, institutions are now plunging…

Abstract

Purpose

As colleges and universities face the shifts of decreasing government funds, increased operating costs, and waning alumni financial support, institutions are now plunging themselves into practices traditionally associated with the business sector. Practices like branding are now being used as a mechanism to increase engagement of alumni and potential donors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of brand identification, or the defining of the self through association with an organization, on alumni supportive behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers surveyed alumni of a mid-sized state-run university in the mid-Atlantic region of the USA to see if identification affected donation behaviors such as choice to donate, total dollar amount donated, and the number of times donated.

Findings

The survey findings showed that brand identification correlated with choice to donate, increased donation dollar amount, and the number of donations. Findings also suggested that interpretation of brand, prestige, satisfaction with student affairs, and participation were positively associated with identification.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are specific to one institution. This research offers support for the importance and value of brand management in higher education. The study also highlights those determinants of brand identification which suggests the use of integrative fundraising techniques.

Originality/value

The study highlighted that university brand identification increases the explanatory power for alumni donor behaviors over those variables typically explored in traditional donor models.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part

Lauren S. Foley

The chapter intervenes in the debate among scholars of legal impact about the extent to which law can change society. Reformers, aims are frustrated when targets of law…

Abstract

The chapter intervenes in the debate among scholars of legal impact about the extent to which law can change society. Reformers, aims are frustrated when targets of law respond with resistance to court decisions, especially where mechanisms to enforce case law are weak (Hall, 2010; Klarman, 2006; Rosenberg, 1991). Even when law’s targets abide by a law, however, other important studies have demonstrated that organizations can leverage ambiguous language to craft policies in compliance that further their aims (Barnes & Burke, 2006; Edelman, 2016; Lipson, 2001). This chapter examines a case in which a state constitutional provision banning affirmative action was written in relatively unambiguous language and one of its targets announced its intention to comply. Through extensive interviews with University officials, this chapter examines the University of Michigan’s use of financial, technological, and political resources to follow the language of the law while still blunting its impact. These findings suggest that to understand law’s impact on society, we need to reconceive compliance and not only take the clarity of the law and its enforcement mechanisms into account but also attend to the goals, resources, and practices of the groups it targets.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-058-0

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Abstract

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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Book part

Bonnie J. Knutson, Jeffrey A. Beck, Arjun J. Singh, Michael L. Kasavana and Ronald F. Cichy

This article presents findings of a Delphi study that predicts events most likely to impact marketing to consumers in lodging, food service and clubs segments for year…

Abstract

This article presents findings of a Delphi study that predicts events most likely to impact marketing to consumers in lodging, food service and clubs segments for year 2007. Two rounds of questionnaires were mailed to panels of industry experts within each sector, with an overall response rate of 42%. Findings suggest that the two overarching marketing trends will be convenience as a driver of consumer choice and marketing to an aging population.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-310-5

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