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Article

Lisa Beasley, Sandra Grace and Louise Horstmanshof

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. Understanding how individuals respond and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. Understanding how individuals respond and adapt to change is essential to assist leaders to manage transformational change effectively. Contemporary health-care environments are characterised by frequent and rapid change, often with unrealistic and challenging time frames. Individuals operate independently, but also as members of teams, professions and organisations. Therefore, having a sound understanding of individual response to change is important for change leaders. In the Australian context, allied health professionals represent a quarter of the health-care workforce. There is a significant gap in understanding how allied health professionals respond and adapt to change.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review was designed to report on the nature and extent of the literature on the response and adaption to change in the context of allied health professionals. Change leaders in the health-care environment face a number of complex challenges when attempting to facilitate change. While this scoping review did not identify any specific literature on the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals, it did however provide information on change models and factors to take into consideration when implementing a change process.

Findings

The results of this scoping review identified findings in two main areas with regard to response and adaptation of allied health to change: a review of change management literature at the organisation level and change management for allied health. Most of the literature described organisational level change management without providing a structural framework for change. At the professional individual level, the literature focused on specific clinical interventions, rather than on the response and adaption to change for allied health. Minimal literature was identified in regard to the response and adaption to change of allied health professionals. In an environment characterised by continuous change and policy reform, a greater understanding of the response and adaption to change by allied health is a priority for research, policy and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This scoping review was undertaken to explore the response and adaption to change of allied health. It sought to identify the factors that may explain why certain disciplines within the allied health professional group responded to change differently. Scoping reviews do not set out to comprehensively source all relevant literature but rather to ascertain the nature and extent of the published literature in the field. Therefore, it is possible that a systematic review might uncover additional relevant papers. However, this scoping review provides a clear indication of the nature and extent of the literature in allied health.

Practical implications

Social implications

This scoping review will assist change leaders to gain a better understanding of theoretical frameworks of individual, team and organisational change processes and the impacts these have individually and collectively on change processes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this scoping review is the first of its kind to identify the minimal literature available on the way allied health professionals respond and adapt to change.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article

John Rodwell and Andre Gulyas

Allied health professionals are vital for effective healthcare yet there are continuing shortages of these employees. Building on work with other healthcare professionals

Abstract

Purpose

Allied health professionals are vital for effective healthcare yet there are continuing shortages of these employees. Building on work with other healthcare professionals, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of psychological contract (PC) breach and types of organisational justice on variables important to retention among allied health professionals: mental health and organisational commitment. The potential effects of justice on the negative outcomes of breach were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regressions analysed data from 113 allied health professionals working in a medium-large Australian healthcare organisation.

Findings

The main negative impacts on respondents’ mental health and commitment were from high PC breach, low procedural and distributive justice and less respectful treatment from organisational representatives. The interaction between procedural justice and breach illustrates that breach may be forgivable if processes are fair. Surprisingly, a betrayal or “aggravated breach effect” may occur after a breach when interpersonal justice is high. Further, negative affectivity was negatively related to respondents’ mental health (affective outcomes) but not commitment (work-related attitude).

Practical implications

Healthcare organisations should ensure the fairness of decisions and avoid breaking promises within their control. If promises cannot reasonably be kept, transparency of processes behind the breach may allow allied health professionals to understand that the organisation did not purposefully fail to fulfil expectations.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into how breach and four types of justice interact to influence employee mental health and work attitudes among allied health professionals.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part

Michelle Veyvoda, Thomas J. Van Cleave and Laurette Olson

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged…

Abstract

This chapter draws from the authors’ experiences with service-learning pedagogy in allied health training programs, and illustrates ways in which community-engaged teaching and learning can prepare students to become ethical healthcare practitioners. The authors infuse examples from their own courses throughout the chapter, mostly from the clinical fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, and occupational therapy. However, the chapter is applicable and generalizable to faculty from a wide scope of allied health training programs. The chapter introduces considerations for establishing campus–community partnerships in an ethical manner, as well as ways to foster student self-reflection and critical thinking through an ethical lens. Principles from the codes of ethics of various allied health professions are incorporated throughout the chapter along with examples of how each can be applied in community-based clinical experiences. Through a review of relevant literature, analysis of professional codes of ethics, case-based examples, and a step-by-step guide to course development, this chapter provides readers with a mechanism to ground their courses in professional ethics in a way that is relatable and relevant to students.

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article

Patricia A. Rowe and Rosalie A. Boyce

The purpose of this paper is to apply an allied health subculture model to clarify key contextual factors that can emerge in the evolution of an allied health subculture…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply an allied health subculture model to clarify key contextual factors that can emerge in the evolution of an allied health subculture as a consequence of deutero‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies are compared to illustrate these two extreme variations in deutero‐learning.

Findings

The first case – characterised by pathological deutero‐learning – operated within the classical medical model. A learning pathology that developed in this situation was a fractured, divisive, self absorbed work culture. A second case – characterised by positive deutero‐learning – operated within a divisional structure characterized by integrated decentralization. What was learned as a result of operating within this alternative organisational structure is that effective management of allied health recognizes two governance arenas: governance required for managing professionals and governing principles for delivering clinical services. Positive deutero‐learning occurred in this situation rather than the reinforcement of existing learning pathologies.

Research limitations/implications

There are clearly implications of the two structural models for self‐fulfilling prophecies, interpersonal interaction, climate formation and learning pathologies.

Practical implications

During a period of major reform differing outcomes in deutero‐learning in these two cases emphasize the importance of the evolution of appropriate organisational structures in developing a leadership‐driven learning process and creating an environment in which learning can occur.

Originality/value

The added value of this application of deuteron learning is that it unpacks the nature of variations in deutoro learning that can emerge during a period of major reform in the evolution of an allied health subculture.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Mary T. Westbrook, Jeffrey Braithwaite, Joanne F. Travaglia, Debbi Long, Christine Jorm and Rick A. Iedema

Patient safety has been addressed since 2002 in the health system of New South Wales, Australia via a Safety Improvement Programme (SIP), which took a system‐wide…

Abstract

Purpose

Patient safety has been addressed since 2002 in the health system of New South Wales, Australia via a Safety Improvement Programme (SIP), which took a system‐wide approach. The programme involved two‐day courses to educate healthcare professionals to monitor and report incidents and analyse adverse events by conducting root cause analysis (RCA). This paper aims to predict that all professions would favour SIP but that their work and educational histories would result in doctors holding the least and nurses the most positive attitudes. Alternative hypotheses were that doctors' relative power and other professions' team‐working skills would advantage the respective groups when conducting RCAs.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses to a 2005 follow‐up questionnaire survey of doctors (n=53), nurses (209) and allied health staff (59), who had participated in SIP courses, were analysed to compare: their attitudes toward the course; safety skills acquired and applied; perceived benefits of SIP and RCAs; and their experiences conducting RCAs.

Findings

Significant differences existed between professions' responses with nurses being the most and doctors the least affirming. Allied health responses resembled those of nurses more than those of doctors. The professions' experiences conducting RCAs (number conducted, leadership, barriers encountered, findings implemented) were similar.

Research limitations/implications

Observational studies are needed to determine possible professional differences in the conduct of RCAs and any ensuing culture change that this may be eliciting.

Practical implications

There is strong professional support for SIPs but less endorsement from doctors, who tend not to prefer the knowledge content and multidisciplinary teaching environment considered optimal for safety improvement education. This is a dilemma that needs to be addressed.

Originality/value

Few longer‐term SIPs' assessments have been realised and the differences between professional groups have not been well quantified. As a result of this paper, benefits of and barriers to conducting RCAs are now more clearly understood.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Wendy Osborn and Genevieve Smyth

The final report for allied health professions Enhance, Include, Evolve: New Ways of Working for allied health professionals (Care Services Improvement…

Abstract

The final report for allied health professions Enhance, Include, Evolve: New Ways of Working for allied health professionals (Care Services Improvement Partnership/National Institute of Mental Health in England, 2008a) is the culmination of a journey that the allied health professionals have travelled over the past six years. Their aim has been to refresh practice in the light of recent policies and initiatives and, in particular, New Ways of Working.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Wendy Smyth, David Lindsay, Daryl Brennan and Daniel Lindsay

The purpose of this paper is to describe the self-reported long-term conditions of medical officers and allied health staff working in a regional public health service in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the self-reported long-term conditions of medical officers and allied health staff working in a regional public health service in northern Australia and how these conditions are managed.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design was used. The sample was all medical officers and allied health staff employed in mid-2015.

Findings

Of the 365 respondents, 217 (59.5 per cent) reported having at least one long-term condition. There was a statistically significant association between professional group and the number of long-term conditions reported, χ2=10.24, p<0.05. A greater proportion of medical officers (n=29, 43.9 per cent) reported having only one long-term condition compared with allied health staff (n=36, 24.5 per cent). The top four categories of conditions were respiratory, musculoskeletal, mental health and episodic and paroxysmal, although the patterns varied amongst the professional groups, and across age groups. Respondents usually managed their main long-term conditions with personal strategies, rarely using workplace strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Although somewhat low, the response rate of 32 per cent was similar to previous surveys in this health service. Since this survey, the health service has implemented a broad Health and Wellness Programme to support their qualified workforce. Future evaluations of this programme will be undertaken, including whether the programme has assisted health professionals to manage their long-term conditions.

Practical implications

There is an urgent need for targeted, workplace-based health promotion strategies to support staff with long-term conditions. Such strategies would complement self-management approaches, and also provide an important recruitment and retention initiative.

Originality/value

This study adds empirical evidence regarding the long-term conditions among health professionals and their self-management strategies. Little is known about the long-term conditions among the various health professional groups and the findings thus make an important contribution to the existing literature.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article

Susan A. Nancarrow, Rachael Wade, Anna Moran, Julia Coyle, Jennifer Young and Dianne Boxall

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse existing clinical supervision frameworks to develop a supervision meta-model.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse existing clinical supervision frameworks to develop a supervision meta-model.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved a thematic analysis of existing supervision frameworks used to support allied health practitioners working in rural or remote settings in Australia to identify key domains of supervision which could form the basis of supervision framework in this context. A three-tiered sampling approach of the selection of supervision frameworks ensured the direct relevance of the final domains identified to Australian rural allied health practitioners, allied health practitioners generally and to the wider area of health supervision. Thematic analysis was undertaken by Framework analysis methodology using Mindmapping software. The results were organised into a new conceptual model which places the practitioner at the centre of supervision.

Findings

The review included 17 supervision frameworks, encompassing 13 domains of supervision: definitions; purpose and function; supervision models; contexts; content; Modes of engagement; Supervisor attributes; supervisory relationships; supervisor responsibilities; supervisee responsibilities; structures/process for supervision and support; facilitators and barriers; outcomes. The authors developed a reflective, supervision and support framework “Connecting Practice” that is practitioner centred, recognises the tacit and explicit knowledge that staff bring to the relationship, and enables them to identify their own goals and support networks within the context in which they work.

Research limitations/implications

This is a thematic analysis of the literature which was argely based on an analysis of grey literature.

Practical implications

The resulting core domains of supervision provide an evidence-based foundation for the development of clinical supervision models which can be adapted to a range of contexts.

Social implications

An outcome of this paper is a framework called Connecting Practice which organises the domains of supervision in a temporal way, separating those domains that can be modified to improve the supervision framework, from those which are less easily modifiable. This approach is important to help embed the implementation of supervision and support into organisational practice. This paper adds to the existing growing body of work around supervision by helping understand the domains or components that make up the supervisory experience.

Originality/value

Connecting Practice replaces traditional, more hierarchical models of supervision to put the practitioner at the centre of a personalised supervision and support network.

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Article

Rebecca Flower, Defne Demir, John McWilliams and Dianne Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between components of the psychological contract, organisational justice, and negative affectivity (NA), with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between components of the psychological contract, organisational justice, and negative affectivity (NA), with key employee outcomes (i.e. organisational commitment, job satisfaction, depression, and psychological distress) among allied health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 134 (response rate of 46 per cent) Australian allied health professional completed a questionnaire.

Findings

Multiple regressions revealed that higher NA was associated with lower organisational commitment, lower job satisfaction, and higher levels of depression. The psychological contract variable, breach, was associated with depression. Informational justice was associated with organisational commitment. Distributive justice was associated with job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by its cross-sectional design and that the data were self-reported. The results obtained suggest the potential utility of collecting longitudinal data to replicate and extend the results.

Practical implications

While NA may be beyond management control, it may be ameliorated by attention to improving communication of management decisions and by sensitivity to the elements implicit in psychological contracts. The negative consequences of contract breach may be offset by informational and distributive justice.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine multiple measures of the psychological contract in addition to organisational justice and NA. Further, this study adds to the literature for allied health professionals, where little is known about factors contributing to their turnover.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article

Philippa Pearce, Bev Phillips, Margaret Dawson and Sandra G. Leggat

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current evidence regarding the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health professionals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current evidence regarding the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors searched CINAHL, Medline, PsychINFO and Cochrane Database. Studies were included if the participants involved were nursing, medical or allied health practitioners, but not students, and if the studies contained discussion regarding the content of clinical supervision. Critical analysis of the articles was carried out by two independent researchers to ensure consistency and thematic analysis was applied.

Findings

Twenty included articles were in three main categories: cross‐sectional studies (n=9), including interview, survey and focus group methods of data collection; literature reviews (n=2); and nine published opinion pieces. Themes related to the content of clinical supervision that were identified were reflective practice; task oriented content; diversity of content; and stress management. The results indicated that current research into the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health practitioners is limited and of low quality and that further research is needed to determine what content in clinical supervision is associated with better quality and safety, particularly for health professions other than nursing and psychology.

Originality/value

This is the first review of the current evidence for what constitutes the most appropriate content of clinical supervision for health professionals. Clinical supervision is an important component of quality assurance and clinical governance frameworks and it is essential that health care organizations are assured that effective clinical supervision is in place.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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