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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2005

J. Rajendran Pandian and Peter McKiernan

The concept of core competence underlies competence-based competition and competence-based management. When new firms get established, due to resource constraints…

Abstract

The concept of core competence underlies competence-based competition and competence-based management. When new firms get established, due to resource constraints, managers have to make conscious decisions to develop certain competencies and not others. In order to have all competencies that are required to be successful, firms look for strategic alliances and to leverage their partner firms’ competencies. In this paper, we develop a contingency model for firms that have to go for strategic alliances to explain which core competencies should be developed internally, which core competencies could be from the alliance partner, which type of alliance will be suitable and whether the firm should choose a short-term, long-term or permanent alliance. Using Hamel’s (1994) generic core competencies and the type of market (industrial or individual), we suggest which type of strategic alliance should be chosen for leveraging a partner’s competencies.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Managing Interfirm Interactions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-169-9

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Maartje Clercx, Vivienne de Vogel, Marike Lancel and Marije Keulen-de Vos

Nonspecific factors such as therapy alliance and treatment motivation have been shown to be predictive of therapy outcome. However, research investigating these factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Nonspecific factors such as therapy alliance and treatment motivation have been shown to be predictive of therapy outcome. However, research investigating these factors among patients with personality disorders, or studies in the context of mandated treatment showed mixed results. A new theory furthermore speculates there may be differences between early formed therapeutic alliance (trait-like) versus alliance formed on the longer term (state-like). This paper aims to investigate the effects of therapy alliance and treatment motivation in 103 Dutch male forensic psychiatric patients with Cluster B personality disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used incidents as a measure of treatment outcome. They studied the effect of nonspecific factors on incidents in two phases, namely, 0 – 18 months and 18 – 36 months, along with known predictors of incidents (age, Historical items of the HCR-20 and psychopathy) as covariates.

Findings

Regression models predicting incidents in the first 18 months of treatment were nonsignificant. Incidents in the second 18 months were significantly predicted by models including alliance and motivation measured at the start of treatment, but not measures at 18 months and covariates. Predictors, except for age, were all nonsignificant.

Practical implications

These findings lend tentative support for the trait-like vs state-like theory of change through nonspecific factors. However, it may also be that other factors are more important in predicting therapy outcome in forensic psychiatric patients with Cluster B personality disorders.

Originality/value

The current study represents the first effort to study the effects of non-specific factors on therapeutic discourse in hospitalized offenders with Cluster B personality disorders.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Nadia Zahoor, Zaheer Khan, Ahmad Arslan, Huda Khan and Shlomo Yedidia Tarba

This paper presents a theorization and an empirical analysis of the influences of international open innovation (IOI) on the international market success of emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a theorization and an empirical analysis of the influences of international open innovation (IOI) on the international market success of emerging market small and medium-sized enterprises (ESMEs). An analysis of the moderating roles played by cross-cultural competencies and digital alliance capabilities in this specific context is also presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative research design involving a survey of 231 ESMEs based in the UAE. The authors formulated some hypotheses and tested them by employing hierarchical regression models.

Findings

The findings revealed that IOI positively affects the international market success of ESMEs. The authors further found that both cross-cultural competencies and digital alliance capabilities moderate the relationship between IOI and international market success.

Originality/value

The study advances the international marketing, knowledge and innovation management literature in two ways. First, it is a pioneering study that advances both the theoretical and empirical scholarship regarding the relationship between IOI and emerging market firm international market success by employing an extended resource-based view. Second, it further highlights the role played by cross-cultural competencies and digital alliance capabilities as effective governance mechanisms that moderate the relationship between IOI and international market success.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Oliver Rossmannek and Olaf N. Rank

This study aims to investigate how the home country institutional development influences the alliance formation process.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the home country institutional development influences the alliance formation process.

Design/methodology/approach

A network of strategic alliances between 95 airlines over a 5-year period is analyzed with stochastic actor-oriented models [i.e. Simulation investigation for empirical network analysis (SIENA)]. Robustness analyses use a subsample of these airlines over a period of 10 years.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the membership in a firm group and a high share of state ownership are more beneficial for the number of alliances if the firm originates from a country with low institutional development.

Practical implications

Firms from less developed countries can use affiliations (e.g. to firm groups or the government) as signals to attract international alliance partners.

Social implications

Policymakers from less developed countries should support the development of (local) firm groups to stimulate interorganizational cooperation.

Originality/value

Firms form alliances based on two aspects: preferences for alliance partners and attractiveness to potential partners. Prior studies outlined that institutional development affects the preferences of firms for alliance partners. This study demonstrates how the institutional development influences the attractiveness to potential partners.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Ming Ning Xiong, Tao Wang and Peng Zhao

Based on the transaction cost theory, this paper aims to investigate the impact of cultural distance on international strategic alliance formation and its underlying mechanisms.

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the transaction cost theory, this paper aims to investigate the impact of cultural distance on international strategic alliance formation and its underlying mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the investment of foreign firms in the Chinese Venture Capital market as an empirical background, Obtaining VC data from Zero2IPO Private Equity, CVsource Investment Database (2001–2015). This paper chooses the Logit regression method, according to Lind’s three-step method to test the inverted U-shaped relationship.

Findings

The empirical analysis of foreign venture capital firms invested in China revealed that there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between cultural distance and the possibility of international strategic alliances. This relationship is the result of two opposing mechanisms, which are the need and the feasibility of international strategic alliances. In addition, this study further examined the moderating effects of social embeddedness and social reputation, revealing the boundary effects on the complex relationship between cultural distance and possible international strategic alliance formation.

Originality/value

This study focuses on cultural difference, which is a key factor leading to a firm’s transaction costs. Based on the transaction cost theory, this paper investigates the impact of cultural distance on international strategic alliance formation and its underlying mechanisms.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Arun Thirumalesh Madanaguli, Amandeep Dhir, Shalini Talwar, Gurmeet Singh and Octavio Escobar

This study aims to find, analyse and synthesise the body of literature on how different health-care businesses form business-to-business (B2B) alliances. By doing so, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to find, analyse and synthesise the body of literature on how different health-care businesses form business-to-business (B2B) alliances. By doing so, this study seeks to identify visible research gaps to suggest future research questions and develop a conceptual framework to set a future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the time-tested systematic literature review method to identify 57 studies that have addressed B2B relationships in the health-care industry. Thereafter, a qualitative analysis is performed to delineate the research profile and synthesise the key themes examined in the selected studies.

Findings

The qualitative analysis uncovers two key thematic foci: types and purposes of B2B relationships and pertinent issues in continued B2B relationships. Within these themes, the authors highlight different types of firms and their reasons for engaging in B2B relationships. The authors also summarise various issues that these firms deal with in such relationships. Finally, the authors highlight the limitations in the existing research and suggest future research questions to address them. The findings are summarised in a conceptual framework.

Originality/value

Although several reviews exist that evaluate the state-of-the-art research on B2B relationships, very few have examined the same in the context of health care. This review adds value to the research by providing a comprehensive overview of the existing findings in the area to encourage future research through a conceptual framework.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Rajesh Kumar and Anoop Nathwani

Alliances are unstable and while a number of explanations have been offered for understanding instability a motivational oriented approach remains underdeveloped. This

Abstract

Purpose

Alliances are unstable and while a number of explanations have been offered for understanding instability a motivational oriented approach remains underdeveloped. This paper seeks to provide a motivational oriented explanation for understanding alliance instability. Firms may enter into an alliance either with a promotion or a prevention mind set and this can be consequential for alliance development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw upon regulatory focus theory and its applications in an alliancing context to derive implications for alliance management. Regulatory focus theory is now increasingly being used to explain various types of organizational phenomenon (e.g. contracting, leadership, alliances). The paper distinguishes between a promotion oriented and a prevention oriented mind set and explores the impact of the different mind sets at the alliance formation, operation, and the outcome stage.

Findings

A key finding is that different mind sets (promotion vs prevention) affect alliance formation, operation, and outcome. At the formation stage the mind sets may determine the success or failure of negotiations; at the operational stage they may determine if conflicts escalate or deescalate; while at the outcome stage they may determine whether the partners continue with or seek to exit from the alliance.

Practical implications

The different motivational orientations have implications for alliance negotiations, the management of the alliance during the operational phase, and/or the decisions that are made by alliancing firms at the outcome phase of the alliance. The paper develops implications for how alliances should be managed for attaining success.

Originality/value

The paper should be of interest to alliance managers as it will give them a new lens for understanding the drivers of alliance success and failure. The impact of motivation on alliance success and failure has not been studied to date and this paper provides a novel approach to assessing its impact.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Somnath Das, Pradyot K. Sen and Sanjit Sengupta

Considers two forms of strategic alliances, technological and marketing, and examines how these alliances foster formation and maintenance of intellectual capital…

Abstract

Considers two forms of strategic alliances, technological and marketing, and examines how these alliances foster formation and maintenance of intellectual capital. Empirical evidence suggests that on average, strategic alliances do create value for shareholders that is consistent with the creation of intellectual capital. Between the two, technological alliances are potentially more beneficial than marketing alliances, and more likely to create intellectual capital. Empirical evidence is consistent with the notion that the gains from alliances are not shared equally by all the partners. When intellectual capital is created by the smaller or financially weaker partner, the return may be appropriately captured by the owner of such capital through strategic alliances. However, if the intellectual capital is created by the larger or financially stronger firm which moves first in an alliance relationship, the return on this intellectual capital may be subject to opportunistic exploitation by the late moving partner.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Rosemary Muange and Loice C. Maru

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of strategic alliances on firm performance and the moderating effect of firm size in retail firms in Nairobi County in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effect of strategic alliances on firm performance and the moderating effect of firm size in retail firms in Nairobi County in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

Resource Dependency Theory was used to guide the study. The study adopted explanatory research design. Questionnaires were used to collect data from sample of 216 respondents through stratified and simple random sampling technique. The study used inferential statistics to test hypotheses.

Findings

Study findings indicated that joint marketing alliances, procurement-supplier alliances, joint manufacturing alliances and technology development alliances have significant and positive effect on firm performance. Based on the findings, creating a joint marketing, procurement-supplier, joint manufacturing and technology development alliances mostly enhance firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered only one county out of 47, although this county hosts the capital city, where most of the firms considered are located. It therefore is representative of all counties and firms considered in this study. It also considered top management staff and thus may have an effect since the lower cadre staff were not considered. However, most of the required information was expected from top management since these are the ones who make decisions, and hence most affected by strategic alliances.

Practical implications

This study has practical implication on firm performance because it has established that strategic alliance improves on overall firm performance. This manifests itself in terms of improve productivity, production efficiency and profitability. It also helps in the availability of products to the end users.

Social implications

Through improved productivity, efficiency and profitability, this translates to improved terms of payment of staff and hence improved quality of lives of their families and communities within which they live. It also enables the firms to participate more in corporate social responsibility projects which in turn improves the standard of living of the communities around them.

Originality/value

The study has provided an empirical insight on the importance of strategic alliance on firm performance. This is the first study done in the Kenyan context concerning strategic alliances formed by firms to improve on their performance especially on retail firms.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

C.M. Clarke‐Hill T. and J. Bailey

The article is based on research carried out in 1995 on a sample of UK‐based retailers that were involved in international joint ventures and international buying alliances

Abstract

The article is based on research carried out in 1995 on a sample of UK‐based retailers that were involved in international joint ventures and international buying alliances. The research identified the differences and comparison between these forms of alliances in terms of the competencies and skills that were being transferred between members of the alliances. The findings suggest that joint venture relationships appear to be closer and of a more strategic nature in achieving competitive advantage than buying alliances. Joint ventures appear to make a greater contribution to product strategy and learning than do alliances. However, little difference was found between the two alliance forms in terms of skill transfers.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 98 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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