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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Allan Cahoon and Julie Rowney

In considering critical areas of human resource development, and upon reviewing the literature on women in management, it became obvious that there was a need for a…

Abstract

In considering critical areas of human resource development, and upon reviewing the literature on women in management, it became obvious that there was a need for a Management Development program that is targeted specifically to women at senior levels of management. The record of course providers in attracting women to participate in existing mixed Executive Development Programs has not been very good, poorer indeed than the proportion of senior women in organizations, which by itself is not at an acceptable level. The research suggests that women generally are less likely to actively seek positions of high profile leadership due to historical social stereotypes of women and the lack of obvious women executive models (Arkkelin, & Simons, 1985; Baril, Elbert, Maher‐Potter, & Reavy, 1989). They are unable and unwilling to absent themselves from families and careers to the same extent as males in our society. Indeed, in the case of women with children, there are very strong norms against women leaving family and children to persue their own professional development (Riger, & Galligan, 1980). Quite the opposite norm exists for males with children who are obviously rewarded in our society for pursuing training and development opportunities which can enhance their career development (Powell, 1988). Thus, the residential and extended time components of current Executive Development Programs are often inconvenient and unsuitable for the majority of women who aspire to or have achieved senior level positions.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

John Storey

Interest in management development is mushrooming. The number ofarticles which address different aspects of it are likewise increasingapace. This has heightened the need…

Abstract

Interest in management development is mushrooming. The number of articles which address different aspects of it are likewise increasing apace. This has heightened the need for a broad‐based review which will pull the material together, give shape to it, evaluate it and draw out its implications. In this, the first of a two‐part article, this task is commenced.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Sachin Kumar Mangla, Sunil Luthra, Suresh Kumar Jakhar, Mohit Tyagi and Balkrishna Eknath Narkhede

From last few decades, logistics management (LM) constitutes a global concern among organization’s supply chain (SC) to improve their business effectiveness. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

From last few decades, logistics management (LM) constitutes a global concern among organization’s supply chain (SC) to improve their business effectiveness. The purpose of this paper is to uncover and analyze the critical factors (CFs) related to the implementation of effective LM concept and benchmark the SC performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The most common (16) CFs were identified and selected through literature and use of the Delphi method. Subsequently, the selected most common CFs were analyzed to distinguish their causal relations using the fuzzy Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) technique under unclear surroundings. A case example of Indian Logistics Company is also discussed to reveal the practical applicability of the research.

Findings

Provision of the effective information communication and technological developments in the system and Management dedication, support and involvement CFs are found to have the top most influences in the effective implementation of LM. This paper also groups the CFs into cause and effect relationship which provides valuable insights for analyzing the factors in successful implementation of LM.

Practical implications

This work attempts to understand the different CFs, their relative position and the importance rating in the system, due to which, managers can differentiate the factor which greatly affects the concepts of implementing LM, and thus, improvements can be made accordingly.

Originality/value

First, this work offers 16 CFs to LM implementation from a SC scenario. Second, in the context of contributing to the theory, the combined Delphi and fuzzy DEMATEL-based model is provided that helps in managing the logistic related issues effectively.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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