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Book part

Adrian McLean and Alistair Moffat

The metaphor of marriage is frequently invoked in the context of mergers. The evidence is that the success rate for marriages is low and even worse for mergers. In this…

Abstract

The metaphor of marriage is frequently invoked in the context of mergers. The evidence is that the success rate for marriages is low and even worse for mergers. In this chapter we explore why mergers often fail to meet the expectations of either party and bring to bear insights from the relational field of marriage counselling to the challenge of achieving cultural development in the wake of a merger. Based on our experience of leading the cultural aspects of a major global merger, we propose some practical methods to help leaders create the conditions for a ‘lasting and happy marriage’.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-196-1

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Article

Alistair Moffat and Adrian McLean

The purpose of this paper is to describe an intervention aimed at supporting the formation of a distinctive new culture in a post‐merger context. The work is informed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an intervention aimed at supporting the formation of a distinctive new culture in a post‐merger context. The work is informed by social constructionist thinking, complexity theory and draws on a semiotic approach to the understanding of cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The case describes an experiment in the use of social networking and web‐based technology in order to enable and support a sustained, organization‐wide conversation. In particular, it describes the combined use of two virtual platforms: a global 72‐hour, virtual conference that allowed for the participation of all 60,000 employees and a virtual forum (Culture Square) that invited ongoing discussion of the desired culture.

Findings

Social networking technologies represent powerful new ways of expanding the possibilities for participation. They can also serve as useful ways of containing the ambiguity and uncertainty associated with mergers. The use of metaphorical representations of legacy cultures can create a helpful platform for generative dialogue and cultural understanding. Legitimating the shadow conversation through the Culture Square accelerated the formation of the emergent culture and powerfully complemented the virtual conference.

Practical implications

The use of an emergent approach to the formation of a new culture calls for high tolerance of ambiguity on the part of organizational leadership. The use of online forums calls for careful facilitation early in the process. Large‐scale virtual conferences present a host of logistical challenges and call for a high level of project management capability as well as skilful local facilitation. Social networking technology enables the formation and effective functioning of virtual teams and participative creation of the new culture at reduced cost.

Originality/value

Several distinctive features of this approach make it a novel approach to post‐merger integration. The paper is of specific value to organisation development and HR professionals at a technical level and to organisation leaders considering strategies for the cultural integration of mergers.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-196-1

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Article

Ian H. Witten and Rodger McNab

The New Zealand Digital Library project aims to develop the underlying technology for digital libraries and make it available for others to use to create their own…

Abstract

The New Zealand Digital Library project aims to develop the underlying technology for digital libraries and make it available for others to use to create their own collections. We have built a large number of demonstration collections. Because our policy is to avoid manual processing of material, full‐text indexing and — to a lesser degree — automatically created browsing structures provide the primary point of access to the material. As well as conventional textual collections, we are experimenting with collections of musical and audio material. This article describes the library structure and present and planned collections, and summarises our experiences in the project.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

The purpose of this paper is to show how mergers can be accomplished with minimum disruption and a positive outcome.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how mergers can be accomplished with minimum disruption and a positive outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes how integration of employees, and their separate cultures, during a merger can be successful with the use of technology.

Findings

Organizations coming together through mergers face a steep learning curve. There are elements of the “give and take” of a marriage in buying into each other's cultural legacy. The formation of that new culture is as much about the process through which standards are arrived at as the values themselves. If a harmonious outcome can be achieved, with process and values aligned, the result will surely be the “good fit” which was promoted enthusiastically by both sides when the merger was first mooted.

Originality/value

Looks at the question of getting the best of both worlds by ensuring that during a merger of two organizations, cultural integration brings something positive to the new organization?

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

Fuchun Peng and Xiangji Huang

The purpose of this research is to compare several machine learning techniques on the task of Asian language text classification, such as Chinese and Japanese where no…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to compare several machine learning techniques on the task of Asian language text classification, such as Chinese and Japanese where no word boundary information is available in written text. The paper advocates a simple language modeling based approach for this task.

Design/methodology/approach

Naïve Bayes, maximum entropy model, support vector machines, and language modeling approaches were implemented and were applied to Chinese and Japanese text classification. To investigate the influence of word segmentation, different word segmentation approaches were investigated and applied to Chinese text. A segmentation‐based approach was compared with the non‐segmentation‐based approach.

Findings

There were two findings: the experiments show that statistical language modeling can significantly outperform standard techniques, given the same set of features; and it was found that classification with word level features normally yields improved classification performance, but that classification performance is not monotonically related to segmentation accuracy. In particular, classification performance may initially improve with increased segmentation accuracy, but eventually classification performance stops improving, and can in fact even decrease, after a certain level of segmentation accuracy.

Practical implications

Apply the findings to real web text classification is ongoing work.

Originality/value

The paper is very relevant to Chinese and Japanese information processing, e.g. webpage classification, web search.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article

David Littlejohn and Sandra Watson

Development of managers is key to the future health of hospitality and tourism: sectors increasingly affected by trends in globalisation and pressures on competitiveness…

Abstract

Development of managers is key to the future health of hospitality and tourism: sectors increasingly affected by trends in globalisation and pressures on competitiveness. Reporting on a round table event, driving forces affecting the development of the sectors are identified; major stakeholder views are offered and the ensuing discussion of graduate profiles was organised into three main scenarios: professional developers, portfolio strategists and pragmatic mavericks. The scenarios identify varying approaches for graduates, higher education institutions and employers. One outcome of the analysis is to note high levels of interdependency between these stakeholders in ensuring any desired outcomes and argues for long‐term, strategic co‐operation.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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