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Article

Alison Preston, Elisa Birch and Andrew R. Timming

The purpose of this paper is to document the wage effects associated with sexual orientation and to examine whether the wage gap has improved following recent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the wage effects associated with sexual orientation and to examine whether the wage gap has improved following recent institutional changes which favour sexual minorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least squares and quantile regressions are estimated using Australian data for 2010–2012 and 2015–2017, with the analysis disaggregated by sector of employment. Blinder–Oaxaca decompositions are used to quantify unexplained wage gaps.

Findings

Relative to heterosexual men, in 2015–2017 gay men in the public and private sectors had wages which were equivalent to heterosexual men at all points in the wage distribution. In the private sector: highly skilled lesbians experienced a wage penalty of 13 per cent; low-skilled bisexual women faced a penalty of 11 per cent, as did bisexual men at the median (8 per cent penalty). In the public sector low-skilled lesbians and low-skilled bisexual women significant experienced wage premiums. Between 2010–2012 and 2015–2017 the pay position of highly skilled gay men has significantly improved with the convergence driven by favourable wage (rather than composition) effects.

Practical implications

The results provide important benchmarks against which the treatment of sexual minorities may be monitored.

Originality/value

The analysis of the sexual minority wage gaps by sector and position on the wage distribution and insight into the effect of institutions on the wages of sexual minorities.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Diane Preston and Alison Smith

Describes an investigation into the use of the accreditation ofprior learning (APL) within management training and development. Areview of training managers use and…

Abstract

Describes an investigation into the use of the accreditation of prior learning (APL) within management training and development. A review of training managers use and opinions of APL within companies in the East Midlands region revealed some surprises. Despite the promotion of APL and its benefits through the Management Charter Initiative (MCI) managers remain somewhat sceptical and confused about the APL process.

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Article

Diane Preston and Alison Smith

The accreditation of prior learning (APL) is an exciting aspect ofthe development of management education in the UK. It has been heavilypromoted by the UK employer‐led…

Abstract

The accreditation of prior learning (APL) is an exciting aspect of the development of management education in the UK. It has been heavily promoted by the UK employer‐led body, the Management Charter Initiative (MCI) within promises of benefits both to individuals and organizations. Examines the level of interest and involvement with an industrial region of the UK. The findings raise some doubts and concerns from training managers and suggest that the initiative may have some way to go.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Steve Thornton

Abstract

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Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

Abstract

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Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

David H. Sochart, Alison J. Long, Kirstie H. Wilson and Martyn L. Porter

The collection of complete and accurate data is an essential prerequisite of any study that aims to produce meaningful results. Much contemporary research in orthopaedic…

Abstract

The collection of complete and accurate data is an essential prerequisite of any study that aims to produce meaningful results. Much contemporary research in orthopaedic surgery has focused on proving the superiority of one implant or technique over another and relies on data which are currently being collected by various different methods. Modern joint replacement surgery is now successful with high implant survivorship at 10 and even 20 years and any new prosthetic design could be expected to result in only a modest improvement over current results. Complete follow‐up as well as optimum data collection are therefore of particular importance to detect any such benefit. Four methods commonly used for the collection of orthopaedic data were compared in this study with the aim of finding out which techniques would automatically result in the most reliable capture of complete data without the need for labour‐intensive supervision and the use of additional resources. The information obtained has been used to re‐define the audit methods for the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

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Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

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The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Judith Broady‐Preston and Alison Lobo

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and relevance of external standards in demonstrating the value and impact of academic library services to their stakeholders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role and relevance of external standards in demonstrating the value and impact of academic library services to their stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Two UK standards, Charter Mark and Customer Service Excellence, are evaluated via an exploratory case study, employing multiple data collection techniques. Methods and results of phases 1‐2 of a three phase research project are outlined.

Findings

Despite some limitations, standards may assist the manager in demonstrating the value, impact and quality of academic libraries in a recessional environment. Active engagement and partnership with customers is imperative if academic libraries are to be viewed as vital to their parent organisations and thus survive.

Originality/value

This paper provides a systematic evaluation of the role of external accreditation standards in measuring academic library service value and impact.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article

Andrew Lee and Alison Ryley

Describes the Spanish Civil War collection in the General Research Division of the New York Public Library. Lists some of the more than 2,500 entries on the Spanish Civil…

Abstract

Describes the Spanish Civil War collection in the General Research Division of the New York Public Library. Lists some of the more than 2,500 entries on the Spanish Civil War and attempts an ideological balance between by providing a broad range of sources — Lists items in both English and Spanish.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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