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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Alison Felstead

This paper is based on a survey of the literature on integrated library management systems published between 1999 and 2003, with a bias towards the academic market in the…

Abstract

This paper is based on a survey of the literature on integrated library management systems published between 1999 and 2003, with a bias towards the academic market in the UK and North America. It describes how new functionality within ILMSs and products complementary to these integrated systems are being offered by software vendors, causing libraries to replace legacy systems with next generation systems and spend more money on add‐on products. Recent trends in integrated library management systems are noted and predictions for their future identified in the literature, are described. Open source software is highlighted as being likely to have a growing impact on the ILMS of the future, after an initial resistance to this from vendors. The paper concludes that the growth of Web services may enable a new approach to the procurement of library management systems.

Details

Program, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Alison Sheridan and Lou Conway

The rapid expansion in part‐time employment in Australia over the past two decades has largely been driven by organisations’ desire to achieve numerical and functional…

Abstract

The rapid expansion in part‐time employment in Australia over the past two decades has largely been driven by organisations’ desire to achieve numerical and functional flexibility (the business case for flexibility) rather than a desire to assist employees balance work and family responsibilities (the equal opportunities case for flexibility). Argues that the differences between the business and equal opportunities discourses surrounding flexibility result in significant problems for both employees and organisations – problems that limit the growth of the individual and the organisation. For part‐time employment to be an effective organisational strategy, it is critical that the human resource management (HRM) role actively negotiate between the different needs of employers and employees. This will entail making both parties’ needs explicit, acknowledging the differences between their needs and directing efforts towards constructing outcomes that are mutually satisfying.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Alison Hirst

The purpose of this paper is to provide a sociological analysis of emergent sociospatial structures in a hot‐desking office environment, where space is used exchangeably…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a sociological analysis of emergent sociospatial structures in a hot‐desking office environment, where space is used exchangeably. It considers hot‐desking as part of broader societal shifts in the ownership of space.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis is based on an ethnographically‐oriented investigation, in which data collection methods used were participant‐observation and interviewing. The analysis uses Lefebvre's conceptualisation of the social production of space and draws on the urban sociology literature.

Findings

The analysis first indicates that, in hot‐desking environments, there may be an emergent social structure distinguishing employees who settle in one place, and others who have to move constantly. Second, the practice of movement itself generates additional work and a sense of marginalisation for hot‐deskers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not provide a generalisable theory, but suggests that loss of everyday ownership of the workspace gives rise to particular practical and social tensions and shifts hot‐deskers' identification with the organisation.

Practical implications

Official requirements for mobility may result in a new social structure distinguishing settlers and hot‐deskers, rather than mobility being spread evenly.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on organisational spatiality by focusing on the spatial practices entailed in hot‐desking, and by contextualising hot‐desking within the wider spatial configuration of capitalism, in which space is used exchangeability in order to realise greater economic returns. Rather than using the popular “nomadic” metaphor to understand the experience of mobility at work, it uses a metaphor of vagrancy to highlight consequences of the loss of ownership of space.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

A. Fox and R. McCormick

By trailing data collection and analytical methods this study aims to address the dearth of research into the use of attending off‐site events for professional learning.

Abstract

Purpose

By trailing data collection and analytical methods this study aims to address the dearth of research into the use of attending off‐site events for professional learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Three events, for academics and school leaders, were studied. A range of methods was trailed during 2006‐2007, with the aim of collecting real‐time data. These included shadowing individual delegates, interviews of other delegates, still and moving imagery and a survey questionnaire.

Findings

Collecting evidence of professional activities in real‐time requires sensitivity to minimise its impact on the activities. It is ideal if everyone at such events can be informed fully in advance of data collection. Any assistance, including participating in the research, in reflecting on the benefits of attending an event was appreciated. The most important benefit of attending events was in networking rather than the formal purpose of the event itself. It was found that such interactions are likely to affect the delegates' sense of identity. Individuals also reported that their strategies for using knowledge from events are incompletely developed.

Practical implications

The study raises issues of how best to support learning at events and the use of knowledge and understanding back in the workplace. Raising awareness of the importance of networking at an event to participants could influence how both organisers plan for, and delegates use, such events.

Originality/value

The study is exploratory both in methodological and in conceptual development and highlights key issues and possible avenues for conceptualising the learning from events. Few studies have been carried out on such events.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2019

Denise Baker

The purpose of this paper is to investigate apprenticeship developments in two National Health Service (NHS) organisations since the introduction of the apprenticeship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate apprenticeship developments in two National Health Service (NHS) organisations since the introduction of the apprenticeship levy in April 2017 and considers potential impact on social mobility. This is a pilot for a broader exploration of implementation of government apprenticeship policy in the NHS.

Design/methodology/approach

Following ethical approval, semi-structured interviews were conducted with two key informants with responsibility for education and training in their respective organisations. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was undertaken to identify major and sub-themes of the interviews.

Findings

Four major themes were identified – organisational readiness, the apprenticeship offer, opportunities for further development and potential problems with implementation. Both organisations were actively seeking opportunities to spend their levy and had developed local strategies to ensure this. The levy was being used to develop both new and existing staff, with leadership and management being particularly identified as an area of growth. Similarly, both organisations were using levy monies to develop the bands 1–4 roles, including the nursing associate. The affordability and bureaucracy of apprenticeships were seen as potential problems to the wider implementation of apprenticeships in the NHS.

Practical implications

Although the apprenticeship levy is being spent in the NHS, there are some challenges for employers in their delivery. The levy is offering new and existing staff the opportunity to undertake personal and professional development at a range of educational levels. This has the potential to increase and upskill the NHS workforce, improve social mobility and possibly lead to larger cultural and professional changes.

Originality/value

This paper offers an early insight into the implementation of apprenticeship policy in a large public sector employer such as the NHS.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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