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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

In the last issue we included a report on the ‘Strategies for Living’ research done by Alison Faulkner and her colleagues at the Mental Health Foundation. This found that many…

Abstract

In the last issue we included a report on the ‘Strategies for Living’ research done by Alison Faulkner and her colleagues at the Mental Health Foundation. This found that many service users are turning to self‐help and complementary therapies to improve their sense of wellbeing and find a spiritual dimension to life. Many people have mental ill health triggered by and interwoven with terrible life events, which they struggle to make sense of and cope with. Our survivor contributor has such a story and has found hope, meaning and purpose in ‘alternative’ or complementary therapies. Her ambition is to help others find ways of improving the quality of their lives in ways that are not generally available in mainstream mental health services.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Alison Faulkner and Vicky Nicholls

This article provides a discussion of the value of user‐led research in mental health, with particular reference to the Strategies for Living project at the Mental Health…

Abstract

This article provides a discussion of the value of user‐led research in mental health, with particular reference to the Strategies for Living project at the Mental Health Foundation.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Benjamin Gray, John Larsen and Alison Faulkner

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention…

Abstract

Purpose

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention was designed to remedy that – focusing in particular on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper describes how people with experience of using mental health services and carers contributed to the development of the PRIMROSE intervention. It draws out key messages for educators, researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach the paper outlines how a Third sector organisation supported the study team in setting up a Lived Experience Advisory Panel (LEAP), drawing on a pre-existing model and recent thinking about service user and carer involvement in research. It is described how the approach sought to engage wider involvement of people with an interest in CVD while also offering more focused input into specifically the development of the trial intervention.

Findings –

An innovative approach was taken whereby a large LEAP, comprising 27 service users and carers, was supporting the development of the study mainly through e-mail and web updates and feedback, while a sub-group of the LEAP, with eight members, met three times and had a focus on inputting ideas into the development of the intervention. The creation of a LEAP proved helpful to the project, resulting in an enhanced and more relevant intervention – summed up in a series of eleven recommendations. Appointment of an independent chair of the sub-group proved invaluable and there is learning from this project for other similar initiatives.

Originality/value

This study has value for others who are developing practice interventions. A range of suggestions were made which will have relevance for training, ensuring that physical health issues are not ignored. There is much to learn too from the process of this project, for the involvement of service users and carers in research, education and in practice development.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Alison Faulkner

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Alison Faulkner

On the 13 March 2000 the Mental Health Foundation launched a groundbreaking report based on a three‐year investigation of the ways in which people with mental health problems…

Abstract

On the 13 March 2000 the Mental Health Foundation launched a groundbreaking report based on a three‐year investigation of the ways in which people with mental health problems manage their own mental health. The project was funded by the National Lottery Charities Board.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Alison Faulkner and Thurstine Basset

This paper aims to explore the extensive roots of peer support in mental health, and to identify the values and principles that the authors wish to hold onto as choices are made…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the extensive roots of peer support in mental health, and to identify the values and principles that the authors wish to hold onto as choices are made as to how and whether to engage with formal peer support within the National Health Service (NHS).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors attempt to cover the ground of three types of peer support, but with an emphasis on informal peer support and participation in consumer or peer‐run groups as providing the roots for the third more formal type, which is often known as intentional peer support (IPS).

Findings

Professionalisation of peer support may endanger the equality that lies at the root of peer support relationships. Independence may also be compromised if peer support becomes just another part of mainstream services. Whilst an individual/personalised approach to providing services has many strengths, one must be careful not to remove all opportunity for service users to meet together, support one another, plan and campaign.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that commissioners of services should aim for a plurality of peer support and be careful to ensure that informal peer support is flourishing as an essential basis for more formal peer support.

Originality/value

The paper shows that, with an increased interest in providing peer support as part of mainstream services, it is important to stress the basic values and principles that underpin informal service‐user led peer support.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Alison Faulkner

Commissioned as part of a Joseph Rowntree Foundation scoping programme, this consultation aims to explore the views of disabled people and service users about risk.

2848

Abstract

Purpose

Commissioned as part of a Joseph Rowntree Foundation scoping programme, this consultation aims to explore the views of disabled people and service users about risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The consultation reached nine individuals and one focus group, reaching a total of 17 disabled people and service users. Their views were supplemented by the literature.

Findings

The landscape of risk and rights is highly complex. Disabled people and service users have quite different concerns about risk to those of the professionals and the regulatory bodies acting on their behalf. Many people talked of the fear of losing their independence, of asserting their rights and the fear of powerlessness in the face of bureaucracy and (sometimes) uncaring staff.

Research limitations/implications

The profile of rights needs to be raised in an accessible and acceptable way: it is necessary to make the language of rights more commonplace. There is a particular need to reach into mental health and residential care services to find ways of enabling people to have their rights realised. The report has implications for risk assessment and risk management as well as for the regulatory bodies responsible in adult social care. Raising awareness among professionals and policy makers about the risks that service users themselves fear and experience should demonstrate just how important it is that the people whose risk is under consideration are involved in the process.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the views of users of adult social care about risk; their views have rarely been documented.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Alison Faulkner and Thurstine Basset

The purpose of this paper is to review current perspectives on peer support in mental health informed by service user perspectives.

1245

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current perspectives on peer support in mental health informed by service user perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is informed by a literature review and consultations with five groups of service users engaged in different forms of peer support.

Findings

The findings suggest that there are many benefits to service users from engaging in peer support. These include: shared identity; development and sharing of skills; increased confidence; improved mental health and wellbeing; and the potential for challenging stigma and discrimination. Most difficulties encountered were associated with “intentional peer support”, where service users are employed as peer support workers – these included role conflict, setting boundaries, and ensuring adequate training and support. A key theme that divided opinion was the degree to which peer support should be “professionalised” as part of statutory services.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that it is vital to acknowledge the different views about peer support that arise in different service user and voluntary sector groups: views about such core issues as payment, equality, and professionalisation. Ultimately, peer support arises from people wanting to create their own support networks; any plans to formalise it from within statutory services need to acknowledge that pre‐existing grassroots expertise.

Originality/value

Recent developments mean that peer support, which originated from the grassroots of service user experience, has taken a new direction through becoming incorporated into statutory services. This paper looks at some of the benefits and pitfalls of these developments informed by the views of service users.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Nicky Stanley and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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