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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Tim Knowles and Alison Dingle

The British pub is part of the face of Britain presented to the world and the theme running through this article is to set British pubs within the context of heritage…

Abstract

The British pub is part of the face of Britain presented to the world and the theme running through this article is to set British pubs within the context of heritage tourism. The thesis contained within this article is to focus on one of the elements of community life, the pub, in order to examine its characteristics and value within the wider spectrum of visitor attractions set within the context of the tourism industry. The article reviews the literature in ascertaining whether the British pub is a tourist attraction for overseas visitors, and why. Whilst the pub has an important role in domestic tourism, the main emphasis of this article is on the national factors that predetermine its survival and the nature of its appeal to visitors from abroad.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Tim Knowles and Alison Dingle

This article presents a brief history on the role of the public house in society and its evolution through the years. The ‘traditional’ pub is discussed and questions are…

Abstract

This article presents a brief history on the role of the public house in society and its evolution through the years. The ‘traditional’ pub is discussed and questions are raised as to the future of the traditional pub following the Beer Orders. This is supported by an analysis of the leisure trends impacting pubs and analysis of the catering and pub markets. Future implications are considered with suggestions for pub success.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Hadyn Ingram

Content‐analyses the academic entries in the WHATT‐CD International Hospitality and Tourism Research Register using four broad categories ‐ general management issues…

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Abstract

Content‐analyses the academic entries in the WHATT‐CD International Hospitality and Tourism Research Register using four broad categories ‐ general management issues hospitality, tourism, and current or “hot” research issues. Identifies clusters of research interest within these categories and identifies “gaps” in the form of relatively unexplored research topic areas.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Joe James, W. Hadley Leavell and Balasundram Maniam

Reports that few Americans plan financially for their retirement and outlines the possible strategies for doing so, referring to relevant research, e.g. company sponsored…

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Abstract

Reports that few Americans plan financially for their retirement and outlines the possible strategies for doing so, referring to relevant research, e.g. company sponsored pension plans, individual retirement accounts and dependence on social security. Surveys students before and after financial planning instruction to identify any attitude changes. Finds that many had no idea of how to calculate the funds needed to meet their expectations initially, but that after their finance course they became more realistic about their requirements. Concludes that more training in retirement planning is needed for the general public, urges workers, employers and acacdemics to respond to calls for further research.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Andrew Collins and Alison McCamley

The purpose of this paper is to compare quality of life scores in a long-term recovery population group (post five years) with a general population group and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare quality of life scores in a long-term recovery population group (post five years) with a general population group and to explore how any differences might be explained by recovering individuals themselves in a small number of follow up qualitative interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

A sequential explanatory mixed method design combining quantitative quality of life measure (WHOQOL-BREF, 1996) and six subsequent semi-structured individual interviews. The quality of life measure compared long-term recovery scores (post five years) with the general population group. The subsequent qualitative semi-structured interviews explored what the participants themselves said about their recovery.

Findings

The quantitative data provide evidence of a significant difference in quality of life (WHOQoL-BREF) in two domains. The long-term recovery group (five or more years into recovery) scored higher in both the environment and psychological domains than the general population group. Of the long-term recovery group, 17 people who still accessed mutual aid scored higher in all four domains than those 23 people who did not. The interviews provide evidence of the this difference as result of growth in psychological elements of recovery, such as developing perspective, improvement in self-esteem, spirituality, as well as contributing as part of wider social involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides support for the quality of life measure as useful in recovery research. The empirical data support the concept of recovery involving improvements in many areas of life and potentially beyond the norm, termed “better than well” (Best and Lubman, 2012; Valentine, 2011; Hibbert and Best, 2011). Limitations: snowballing method of recruitment, and undertaken by public health practitioner. Some suggestions of women and those who attend mutual aid having higher quality of life but sample too small.

Practical implications

Use QoL measure more in recovery research. Public health practitioners and policy makers need to work with partners and agencies to ensure that there is much more work, not just treatment focused, addressing the wider social and environmental context to support individuals recovering from alcohol and drugs over the longer term.

Originality/value

One of small number of studies using with participants who have experienced long-term (post five years) recovery, also use of quality of life measure (WHOQOL-BREF, 1996) with this population.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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