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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Alison Brown

The importance of hospital board engagement in the work of governing healthcare quality has been demonstrated in the literature. Research into influences on effective…

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Abstract

Purpose

The importance of hospital board engagement in the work of governing healthcare quality has been demonstrated in the literature. Research into influences on effective corporate governance has traditionally focused on board architecture. Emerging research is bringing to light the importance of governance dynamics. This paper contributes to emerging research through highlighting how communication and leadership underpin effective engagement in governing healthcare quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study of eight Australian public hospitals was undertaken involving document review, interviews and observations. Case studies were allocated into high- or low-engagement categories based on evidence of governance processes being undertaken, in order to compare and contrast influencing factors. Thematic analysis was undertaken to explore how communication and leadership influence healthcare governance.

Findings

Several key components of communication and leadership are shown to influence healthcare quality governance. Clear logical narratives in reporting, open communication, effective questioning and challenge from board members are important elements of communication found to influence engagement. Leadership that has a focus on healthcare excellence and quality improvement are aligned and promote effective meeting processes is also found to foster governance engagement. Effective engagement in these communication and leadership processes facilitate valuable reflexivity at the governance level.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the way in which boards and senior managers can strengthen governance effectiveness through attention to key aspects of communication and leadership.

Originality/value

The case study approach allows the exploration of communication and leadership in greater depth than previously undertaken at the corporate governance level in the healthcare setting.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2022

Janie Alison Brown, Elaine Watson and Tamra Rogers

This study aimed to understand the effect of repeated exposure to personal threats on hospital security guards' well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to understand the effect of repeated exposure to personal threats on hospital security guards' well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A single site, qualitative study using a convenience sampling approach to recruit hospital security guards who attend code black (staff, patient or visitor exposed to a personal threat) calls.

Findings

Five interviews were held with eight hospital security guards. Seven of the eight participants were male. Seven were Caucasian. All had extensive experience in the industry. Six consistent themes emerged from the data covering well-being, coping and support; concerns about physical safety; compassion and compassion fatigue; effective communication is crucial; role/s; and training and equipment.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a convenient sampling approach to recruit security guards from one acute hospital in Australia, limiting the applicability of the findings to other contexts. Although the majority of hospital security guards were interviewed, the format of interviews varied between one-to-one interviews and focus groups, based on the availability of guards to participate and attend.

Practical implications

We recommend that the role of the hospital security guard in Code black situations is documented in policy and practice documents, and articulated in multidisciplinary aggression management training. There should be clear statements on the importance of strong communication and clinical leadership in code black situations. Hospital security guards should attend Mental Health First Aid training, which teaches on and off the job coping strategies. There is a need for debriefing and consideration should be given to supporting “time-out”. Hospital security guards require education on infection control and the risks associated with blood and body fluids.

Originality/value

Hospital security guards play an important role in the safety of patients and staff in code black situations. When they are well supported, they experience high levels of job satisfaction and are able to maintain their compassion towards people who are aggressive and violent towards them. However, repeated exposure to code black situations has the potential to erode the well-being of hospital security guards.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Alison Brown

The burning question for state/regional networks at present is deciding who the “thou” in the above quotation represents. Is it the NSF, the NREN, or, in the case of Bill…

1942

Abstract

The burning question for state/regional networks at present is deciding who the “thou” in the above quotation represents. Is it the NSF, the NREN, or, in the case of Bill Schrader's (of Performance Systems, Inc.) now famous quotation, “follow the money,” is it the commercial client? Is the objective of the regional network to find a niche market with long‐term survival value? Is it to stay in business long enough to address the needs of our academic customers and then retire more‐or‐less gracefully when no longer needed? Or is it to try to become a full‐service organization with long‐term viability?

Details

Internet Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Robert F. Bruner, Kenneth M. Eades and Sean Carr

The cofounder of Compass Records, a small, independent music-recording company, must decide whether to “produce and own” the next album of an up-and-coming folk musician…

Abstract

The cofounder of Compass Records, a small, independent music-recording company, must decide whether to “produce and own” the next album of an up-and-coming folk musician or simply “license” her finished recording. This case presents information sufficient to build cash-flow forecasts for either investment alternative. Discounted cash flow (DCF) analysis reveals that licensing will be the more attractive alternative unless the student assesses the value of the options for follow-on albums included in the “produce-and-own” contract.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Alison Brown and Alec Logan

Outlines the new Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Approved Code ofPractice which provides the HSE with a range of new powers with which toprosecute outbreaks of…

Abstract

Outlines the new Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Approved Code of Practice which provides the HSE with a range of new powers with which to prosecute outbreaks of legionellosis. Presents the principal points of the updated Guidance Note on Legionnaires′ Disease HS (G) 70 which provides advice on preventing and minimizing the risk of an outbreak and being able to demonstrate that measures have been taken to achieve this.

Details

Facilities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Mark Tyler and Alison Brown

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), which affects occupants of a buildingonly whilst they are within its confines, is the subject of legalcontroversy regarding whose liability…

Abstract

Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), which affects occupants of a building only whilst they are within its confines, is the subject of legal controversy regarding whose liability it is to put it right and eventually compensate the victims. Employers may not be solely responsible, as it is possible for the original designers/architects/builders to be held accountable where negligence can be proved. If an employer has done all that is reasonably practicable, even though failing to achieve a totally satisfactory solution, this would probably constitute a safe defence in law. However, the extent of an employer′s responsibility in this connection is still the subject of debate.

Details

Facilities, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Ruth Elwood Martin, Debra Hanson, Christine Hemingway, Vivian Ramsden, Jane Buxton, Alison Granger‐Brown, Lara‐Lisa Condello, Ann Macaulay, Patti Janssen and T. Gregory Hislop

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, by incarcerated women who were members of a prison participatory health research team, of a survey tool regarding…

1112

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, by incarcerated women who were members of a prison participatory health research team, of a survey tool regarding homelessness and housing, the survey findings and recommendations for policy.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed by incarcerated women in a minimum/medium security women's prison in Canada. Associations were examined between socio‐demographic factors and reports of difficulty finding housing upon release, homelessness contributing to a return to crime, and a desire for relocation to another city upon release. Open‐ended questions were examined to look for recurrent themes and to illuminate the survey findings.

Findings

In total, 83 women completed the survey, a 72 per cent response rate. Of the 71 who were previously incarcerated, 56 per cent stated that homelessness contributed to their return to crime. Finding housing upon release was a problem for 63 per cent and 34 per cent desired relocation to another city upon release. Women indicated that a successful housing plan should incorporate flexible progressive staged housing.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focuses only on incarcerated women but could be expanded in future to include men.

Practical implications

Incarcerated women used the findings to create a housing proposal for prison leavers and created a resource database of the limited housing resources for women prison leavers.

Social implications

Lack of suitable housing is a major factor leading to recidivism. This study highlights the reality of the cycle of homelessness, poverty, crime for survival, street‐life leading to drug use and barriers to health, education and employment that incarcerated women face.

Originality/value

Housing is a recognized basic determinant of health. No previous studies have used participatory research to address homelessness in a prison population.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 8 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Ruth Elwood Martin, Sue Adamson, Mo Korchinski, Alison Granger-Brown, Vivian R. Ramsden, Jane A. Buxton, Nancy Espinoza-Magana, Sue L. Pollock, Megan J.F. Smith, Ann C. Macaulay, Lara Lisa Condello and T. Gregory Hislop

Women in prison throughout the world experience higher rates of mental and physical illness compared with the general population and compared with men in prison. The paper…

1040

Abstract

Purpose

Women in prison throughout the world experience higher rates of mental and physical illness compared with the general population and compared with men in prison. The paper finds no published studies that report on men or women in prison engaging in participatory health research to address their concerns about nutrition and fitness. The purpose of this paper is to describe a pilot nutrition and fitness program, which resulted from a unique prison participatory health research project.

Design/methodology/approach

Women in prison designed, led, and evaluated a six-week pilot fitness program in a minimum/medium security women's prison. Pre- and post-program assessments included a self-administered questionnaire and body measures. Open-ended questionnaire responses illuminated the quantitative findings.

Findings

Sixteen women in prison completed the program evaluation. Weight, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and chest measurements decreased, and energy, sleep, and stress levels improved by the end of the program.

Research limitations/implications

As a component of a participatory research project, incarcerated women designed and led a nutrition and fitness program, which resulted in improved body measures and self-reported health benefits.

Originality Value

Incarceration provides opportunities to engage women in designing their own health programs with consequent potential long-term “healing” benefits.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

David Thompson

113

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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