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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Guy Lincoln and Alison Bradbury

Examines the changing employment needs in licensed retailing in particular the need for highly skilled management. The increasing sophistication of pub retailing is…

Abstract

Examines the changing employment needs in licensed retailing in particular the need for highly skilled management. The increasing sophistication of pub retailing is addressed along with the growth of the food provision in pubs. The paper identifies a skills gap in licensed retailing management and calls for increased opportunities for graduate trainees. The case of Bass taverns is discussed.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Alison Culverwell, Alisoun Milne, Reinhard Guss and Jackie Tuppen

Despite evidence that early identification of dementia is of growing policy and practice significance in the UK, limited work has been done on evaluating screening…

Abstract

Despite evidence that early identification of dementia is of growing policy and practice significance in the UK, limited work has been done on evaluating screening measures for use in primary care. The aim of this paper is to offer a clinically informed synthesis of research and practice‐based evidence on the utility, efficacy and quality of dementia screening measures. The study has three elements: a review of research literature; a small‐scale survey of measures employed in three primary care trusts; and a systematic clinical evaluation of the most commonly used screening instruments. The authors integrated data from research and clinical sources. The General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG), Memory Impairment Screen (MIS) and Mini‐Cognitive Assessment Instrument (Mini‐Cog) were found to be: brief; easy to administer; clinically acceptable; effective; minimally affected by education, gender, and ethnicity; and to have psychometric properties similar to the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Although the MMSE is widely used in the UK, this project identifies the GPCOG, MIS and Mini‐Cog as more appropriate for routine use in primary care. A coherent review of evidence coupled with an in‐depth evaluation of screening instruments has the potential to enhance ability and commitment to early intervention in primary care and, as part of a wider educational strategy, improve the quality and consistency of dementia screening.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

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Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1982

Liz Chapman, Elizabeth Baker, Peter H Mann, WA Munford and AGK Leonard

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

Abstract

‘WHAT A novel arrangement. Is any reason given?’

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New Library World, vol. 83 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Since its origins during the Second World War, the computer industry has grown more rapidly than any other technology in history, and this growth has spawned a wealth of…

Abstract

Since its origins during the Second World War, the computer industry has grown more rapidly than any other technology in history, and this growth has spawned a wealth of new terms and manners‐of‐speaking to describe computers and the uses to which they can be put. Such terms are often referred to collectively as computerese. The thesis of Barry's entertaining book is that the use of computerese is increasingly being extended to a wealth of other subjects that are often totally unrelated to computing. Barry refers to this use (or abuse) of language as technobabble: the subject matter and the pleasingly tongue‐in‐cheek style can be judged from the introduction, which starts as follows: ‘This paper‐based, productized bookware module is designed to support the robust implementation of a friendly, context‐driven interface between the developer and the end‐user. Did you understand this sentence? If so, you are fluent in technobabble’.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Tara Brabazon, Tiffany Lyndall-Knight and Natalie Hills

Abstract

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The Creative PhD: Challenges, Opportunities, Reflection
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-790-7

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Book part
Publication date: 17 November 2017

Naomi Nichols, Alison Griffith and Mitchell McLarnon

In this chapter, we explore the use of participatory and community-based research (CBR) strategies within institutional ethnography. Reflecting on our current, past, and…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the use of participatory and community-based research (CBR) strategies within institutional ethnography. Reflecting on our current, past, and future projects, we discuss the utility of community-based and participatory methods for grounding one’s research in the actualities of participants’ lives. At the same time, we note ontological and practical differences between most community-based participatory action research (PAR) methodologies and institutional ethnography. While participants’ lives and experiences ground both approaches, people’s perspectives are not considered as research findings for institutional ethnographers. In an institutional ethnography, the objects of analysis are the institutional relations, which background and give shape to people’s actualities. The idea is to discover something through the research process that is useful to participants. As such, the use of community-based and participatory methods during analysis suggests the greatest utility of this sociological approach for people.

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Perspectives on and from Institutional Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-653-2

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

John P. Wilson and Sarah Gosiewska

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it will trace, for the first time, the historical events which have progressively influenced emergency training. Second, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it will trace, for the first time, the historical events which have progressively influenced emergency training. Second, it will evaluate the design considerations and delivery of strategic training to participants attending a multi-agency gold incident command programme. Finally, it will make recommendations about the suitability of training approaches for different aspects of emergency training.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed methods study design involving a longitudinal literature review of disasters which influenced training; and a case study of multi-agency training.

Findings

Guidance for major incidents developed in a relatively ad hoc manner until consolidated by the Civil Contingencies Act (2004). In addition, health and safety considerations prevent on-the-job training during major incidents. Furthermore, different forms of training would appear to be more suited to training for the different stages of a major incident.

Research limitations/implications

The European Union delegates responsibility for emergency planning to individual nations. Although the findings relate to this UK case study the lessons learned would appear to be generic and may be applicable in other countries.

Practical implications

Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident.

Social implications

Emergency training is a statutory requirement and therefore needs to be systematically organised. Different types of training are suited to different stages of a major incident.

Originality/value

This is the first paper charting the historical development of emergency training. There is a limited base of literature for emergency training.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1986

TONY WARSHAW, LIZ BOWMAN, TERRY HANSTOCK, ALLAN BUNCH, EDWIN FLEMING and WILFRED ASHWORTH

Two new members of staff are joining BLRDD in September: Lawrence Howells, who is at present working in the Science Reference and Information service, will become a…

Abstract

Two new members of staff are joining BLRDD in September: Lawrence Howells, who is at present working in the Science Reference and Information service, will become a project officer, and Ros Cotton, who is currently working in the Library Association Library, will be the new dissemination officer.

Details

New Library World, vol. 87 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Graeme Baxter, Rita Marcella and Mary O'Shea

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of Twitter by Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) for the provision of constituency-related information, or in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of Twitter by Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) for the provision of constituency-related information, or in support of their constituency service work.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of 10,411 tweets sent by the 105 MSPs on Twitter during four weeks in early-2014.

Findings

While there was some evidence of MSPs on Twitter acting as a promoter of local community interests and as a conduit for information on local policy issues and events, their tweets were dominated by the wider, national, political agenda and by the Scottish independence debate. Compared with their online behaviour as parliamentary candidates three years earlier, MSPs placed an even greater emphasis on the one-way broadcast of information to their followers. They were reluctant to respond to contentious local policy questions, or to enter into any visible, meaningful, political debate with their constituents.

Research limitations/implications

Although the research was conducted seven months before the Scottish independence referendum on 18 September 2014, the independence debate still dominated proceedings on Twitter. It might, therefore, be appropriate to revisit MSPs’ use of Twitter at some point during a truer “peacetime” period.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic content analysis of tweets sent by all MSPs on Twitter. It allows the authors to compare their actual Twitter use with that envisaged by the Scottish Parliament, as a way of MSPs communicating about their work and engaging with their constituents.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 68 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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