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1 – 10 of 95
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Alison Andrews

Describes coeliac disease with its increased risk of osteoporosis for the patient. Often misdiagnosed or not recognised early, coeliac disease leads to further complications…

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Abstract

Describes coeliac disease with its increased risk of osteoporosis for the patient. Often misdiagnosed or not recognised early, coeliac disease leads to further complications, particularly osteoporosis. Provides eating/nutrition guidelines for coeliac sufferers to avoid osteoporosis in later life.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2005

Alison Ballantyne, Julianne Cheek, David Gillham and James Quan

Having an ageing population is an issue facing many countries, particularly western nations. With governments and service providers focusing on healthy ageing and ageing in place…

Abstract

Having an ageing population is an issue facing many countries, particularly western nations. With governments and service providers focusing on healthy ageing and ageing in place, notions of choice and active participation for older people in selecting services appropriate to remaining in the community are also emphasised. Central to this is the issue of information navigation: knowing what services are available and how to get that information, for older people and those who support them. Based on a series of qualitative studies of service provision and using perspectives from older people, their families and those who provide services for them, this paper argues that greater attention needs to be paid to the process of information navigation as opposed to providing ever more information content.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Sarah Aust

This article explores the use of the Good Lives Model and its relevance to people with a learning disability and forensic needs. The article presents the rationale for using the…

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Abstract

This article explores the use of the Good Lives Model and its relevance to people with a learning disability and forensic needs. The article presents the rationale for using the model; arguing that it has the potential to address the complexities of meeting both the person‐centred agenda in learning disabilities services and the public protection agenda in relation to the management of mentally disordered offenders, including those detained under the Mental Health Act (2007). The model is compared with other treatment models, such as the Risk‐Need‐Responsivity Model (RNR). The paper briefly explores how the model may be practically applied in a service for people with learning disabilities who have committed, or who are at risk of committing, sexual offences.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1965

Alison Douglas

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work their…

Abstract

THE MAJOR CONTRIBUTION, though not the only one, has been made by Scottish authors, both by the well‐known ones, such as R. L. Stevenson and J. M. Barrie, in whose work their Scottish origin has played its part, and by others, like Norman Macleod and Ian Maclaren, whose reputation scarcely extended outside their native country or has been since forgotten.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Abstract

Details

The Disabled Tourist: Navigating an Ableist Tourism World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-829-4

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Alison Taysum and Stephen Rayner

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the role of the doctorate as an investment in education, and to consider whose education is being invested in, how and why. We examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the role of the doctorate as an investment in education, and to consider whose education is being invested in, how and why. We examine the role of postgraduate research within the doctorate and how this may contribute to a self-improving profession, self-improving educational institutions and self-improving education systems.

Methodology/approach

The methodology is the representation of different chapters from authors that explore the key themes that we introduce in this chapter.

Findings

We present the three main findings from a British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Doctoral Research Interest Group seminar series funded by the British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS). First is the progression of a systemic basis for active educational research, engaged with the mobilization of learning-based and pedagogic knowledge leadership within doctoral scholarship, learning and pedagogy. Second is the continued examination of the internationalization of purpose, structure and function in doctoral study through evidence informed leadership. Third is the provision of opportunities to explore ways in which doctoral study may facilitate educational leaders to recognize ‘minoritised’ and marginalized communities, and disrupt dominant discourses that work within patterns of ecologies that ‘pathologise’ diversity and difference.

Originality/value

Here, a clearly stated focus emerged during the seminar series, emphasizing how leaders engaging with doctoral learning have the opportunity to articulate generative transformative theories of human learning for a civic curriculum, and to apply this new knowledge to work for change for students’ full economic, cultural and political participation in the society.

Details

Investing in our Education: Leading, Learning, Researching and the Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-131-2

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Place, Race and Politics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-046-4

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1950

OUR centenary year has been heralded by no great publicity; the nation, as a reviewer of Brown's Manual in the Times Literary Supplement suggests, has no great awareness of the…

Abstract

OUR centenary year has been heralded by no great publicity; the nation, as a reviewer of Brown's Manual in the Times Literary Supplement suggests, has no great awareness of the services of libraries or their considerable progress of late years. Some signs there have been. A leaderette in the Daily Telegraph gave a fair, slightly‐sketched picture of what is being done and, a few Sundays earlier, Alison Settle wrote an account of the Christmas work that was being done in a near‐London library in a manner most desirable but which seemed to show that she had only just become aware of activities which children's librarians had been pursuing, Christmas tree and all, for at least twenty years. While we appreciate this well‐deserved tribute and echo it, we are concerned here more with ways that may be adopted to make such services more widely and articulately recognized by our people. Every opportunity will be taken, we are sure, by the Library Association Council to bring such recognition about. There does not, however, seem to be any general programme for local individual library effort, although this must have been discussed by the L.A. Perhaps something may emerge from the self‐examination which Mr. L. R. McColvin suggested at Eastbourne. That would result in more efficiency, the best form of publicity. Best things, however, are slow to be recognized, and as it is at the local library that our reputation is made or lost, we suggest that each library should have its own exhibition, made from local materials, with the title, or intention in the title, “One Hundred Years of Public Libraries!” It should show what it was like in Bookton or in Bibliopolis one hundred years ago—the paucity of opportunity, the few newspapers and periodicals, the book famine; with such old pictures, newcuttings and broadsides as it may possess, it should show how in that town efforts were made to bring in the light. H. A. L. Fisher's “A city without books is a city without light” may be quoted freely. Then, by Stages it could show what developed; leading up to what is now: the well‐lighted, comfortable and active libraries with manifold inner‐ and extra‐mural work for people of all ages, the adequate bookstock and the eager library Staffs infused with Dr. Savage's “incandescent enthusiasm ” for public service. Let the Story be told in all the local newspapers of the labours of Edward Edwardes, the often tragi‐comedy of the town's ballots on the adoption of the acts, the frustrations of poverty and how they were overcome. Let just claims be made for what is now. Surely every librarian could do something of this, even in the smallest towns and even in those where the local authority has not realized its library duties very fully—perhaps most in these. Praise the local pioneers, pour encourager les autres. Have we not the patronage of the Sovereign, the presidency of the Duke to answer any cavil?

Details

New Library World, vol. 52 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1966

Alison Douglas

The characteristics of the so‐called Kailyard school of Scottish novelists are similar to what may be found in Catherine Sinclair, Norman Macleod and the short stories of Mrs…

Abstract

The characteristics of the so‐called Kailyard school of Scottish novelists are similar to what may be found in Catherine Sinclair, Norman Macleod and the short stories of Mrs Cupples: close observation of persons and traditions in a well‐known, confined locality, a good deal of humour and a good deal of pathos, sometimes deteriorating into sentimentality. None of the most typical Kailyard books was meant for children, but the three principal authors—S. R. Crockett, Ian Maclaren and J. M. Barrie—all wrote at least one juvenile book of some merit.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Monica D.T. Rysavy, Russell Michalak and Alison Wessel

The purpose of this paper is to examine eight years of quantitative and qualitative student feedback on library services collected through an institution-wide student satisfaction…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine eight years of quantitative and qualitative student feedback on library services collected through an institution-wide student satisfaction survey.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilizes data collected during an eight-year period from the college’s student satisfaction survey. This survey contained 40 questions which addressed topics concerning the college’s 13 major departments. Six of the questions were devoted to library services.

Findings

Over the eight years surveyed, across all divisions surveyed (undergraduate students, graduate students and graduate Saturday students), students on average tended to select “agree” or “strongly agree” with the following six questions asked: The materials in the library meet my course requirements. The library has enough laptop computers for student use. The instructional materials for using the online databases are helpful. The library hours match my schedule and needs. The library equipment is in good working order. The library is generally quiet and suitable for study.

Originality/value

This institutionally crafted, mixed methods survey was deployed over an eight-year period at a relatively minimal cost (in-house staff hours were used to analyze the data gathered and paper Scantron sheets were used to deploy). Furthermore, rich data were gathered from a relatively simple instrument and this information was used to make institution-wide decisions.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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