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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Alina Morawska and Matthew Sanders

Despite the importance of increasing engagement and minimising attrition and drop‐out in parenting interventions, there is a paucity of empirical evidence examining…

692

Abstract

Despite the importance of increasing engagement and minimising attrition and drop‐out in parenting interventions, there is a paucity of empirical evidence examining factors related to engagement and participation. The range of factors examined in relation to engagement is generally limited in scope and variety, focusing on variables of convenience rather than utilising a theoretically‐driven approach.The aim of this article is to review the factors related to parental engagement with interventions and to describe strategies and implications for improving engagement with parenting interventions. Several policy and practice implications are identified: (1) Poor parental engagement may threaten or compromise the capacity of parenting programmes to deliver valued outcomes. Viable engagement strategies need to be a core part of prevention and early intervention parenting programmes; (2) Agencies delivering parenting services need a proactive engagement strategy, which includes strategies to prevent drop‐out, as well as strategies to actively respond to parental disengagement; (3) Research is needed to test the efficacy and robustness of different engagement enhancement strategies. Empirical tests are needed to test the effectiveness of different engagement strategies in order to ensure that the most efficient, cost‐effective and efficacious approach is used in order to engage parents. Investment of research effort to improve parental engagement is likely to have a high yield in terms of programme efficiency, utility and cost effectiveness. We conclude that research examining how to improve engagement and decrease non‐completion is needed to strengthen the population level value of parenting programmes as preventive interventions.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2008

Nick Axford, Emma Crewe, Celene Domitrovich and Alina Morawska

This article reviews the contents of the previous year's editions of the Journal of Children's Services (Volume 2, 2007), as requested by the Journal's editorial board. It…

Abstract

This article reviews the contents of the previous year's editions of the Journal of Children's Services (Volume 2, 2007), as requested by the Journal's editorial board. It draws out some of the main messages for how high‐quality scientific research can help build good childhoods in western developed countries, focusing on: the need for epidemiology to understand how to match services to needs; how research can build evidence of the impact of prevention and intervention services on child well‐being; what the evidence says about how to implement proven programmes successfully; the economic case for proven programmes; the urgency of improving children's material living standards; how to help the most vulnerable children in society; and, lastly, the task of measuring child well‐being.

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

379

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

84

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Michael Little and Nick Axford

This article reviews the first volume of the Journal of Children's Services. In doing so, it discusses broader directions and challenges in research, policy and practice…

Abstract

This article reviews the first volume of the Journal of Children's Services. In doing so, it discusses broader directions and challenges in research, policy and practice. The article focuses on discussion about outcomes, the ‘idea’ of children's services and the impact of interventions on children's health and development. It welcomes reflections on different approaches to outcome measurement, analyses of the practicalities of implementing policy reforms and rigorous evaluations of the impact of Early Years, parenting and other programmes. At the same time, it suggests specific areas in which more work would be valuable, including: socio‐political commentary on policy developments; methods of and results from need analyses; empirical research on inter‐agency initiatives; how to improve the processes and structures that underpin good outcomes; transitions; and understanding ‘what works’ in research dissemination and utilisation. The value of international perspectives (including intra‐UK comparisons) is stressed. Forthcoming special editions on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (2007) and anti‐social behaviour by young people (2008) will help to address other points raised.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Michael Little and Nick Axford

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

1 – 7 of 7