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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Katie Turner, Shelagh Ferguson, Julia Craig, Alice Jeffries and Sarah Beaton

Are peaches, Caesar salad and chocolate masculine or feminine food? Literature suggests that there is a clear association between certain types of food, portion sizes and…

Abstract

Purpose

Are peaches, Caesar salad and chocolate masculine or feminine food? Literature suggests that there is a clear association between certain types of food, portion sizes and gendered identities. This research paper and short film aims to explore the theory in practice of food consumption for young consumers, particularly impression management required to create/maintain an attractive identity to the opposite sex.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt an interpretive approach to an in‐depth analysis of the food practices of an all male and an all female household. They use a theory in practice methodology to explore their food consumption.

Findings

It is found that despite enlightenment in many areas, gendered identities are still strongly associated with food consumption. The experiment in which each household consumed a meal associated with the opposite gender offers insight into the association between food consumption and gendered identity. The social implications of the research demonstrate that masculine identity is supported and negotiated through what he is eating, whereas feminine identity is being constructed by what she is not eating. It is concerning that an attractive feminine identity is premised on omission rather than consumption and traps many females into a negative and potentially harmful relationship with food consumption.

Originality/value

The use of videography allows insight into the negotiation of an underpinning cultural attitude where women eat less to be what consumer culture has defined as an attractive feminine identity which means being slimmer and smaller than males.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Brian M. Young

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Stephen B. Gilbert, Michael C. Dorneich, Jamiahus Walton and Eliot Winer

This chapter describes five disciplinary domains of research or lenses that contribute to the design of a team tutor. We focus on four significant challenges in developing…

Abstract

This chapter describes five disciplinary domains of research or lenses that contribute to the design of a team tutor. We focus on four significant challenges in developing Intelligent Team Tutoring Systems (ITTSs), and explore how the five lenses can offer guidance for these challenges. The four challenges arise in the design of team member interactions, performance metrics and skill development, feedback, and tutor authoring. The five lenses or research domains that we apply to these four challenges are Tutor Engineering, Learning Sciences, Science of Teams, Data Analyst, and Human–Computer Interaction. This matrix of applications from each perspective offers a framework to guide designers in creating ITTSs.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Abstract

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1905

As a result of the changes caused by the preparation of foods gradually passing out of the home into the hands of manufacturers, there has arisen an absolute need for a…

Abstract

As a result of the changes caused by the preparation of foods gradually passing out of the home into the hands of manufacturers, there has arisen an absolute need for a complete supervision of the public food supplies. A supervision which shall place some limit upon the substitution of cheaper and inferior methods and dangerous materials in place of the standard formerly used in our homes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 7 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1920

In an article relating particularly to Meat Inspection, the Pall Mall Gazette observes that “before the war we were not entirely neglectful of public hygiene. We had, for…

Abstract

In an article relating particularly to Meat Inspection, the Pall Mall Gazette observes that “before the war we were not entirely neglectful of public hygiene. We had, for instance, a fairly efficient system of food inspection which, by ceaseless vigilance and prompt and relentless prosecution of offenders, was steadily eliminating adulteration and preventing the public sale of bad food. Then came the war and the food shortage and a relaxing of safeguards. But the war is over, not technically perhaps, but none the less over, and it is time that the old vigilance of inspection was restored. It is the duty of the Ministry of Health to see that this is done, and the local authorities, despite the control exercised over them by the local tradespeople, should be compelled to return to the pre‐war method of food inspection. That unclean and bad food is being sold with comparative impunity is notorious and the protest of the veterinary surgeons against the inadequacy of meat inspection but called expert attention to an evil of which everyone is aware. The natural affection of the Board of Agriculture for the British farmer, and the equally natural desire of the Food Ministry to save its financial face, are it may be supposed, factors which make for neglect. But the Food Ministry has a duty to the public which must override all Departmental consideration, and we hope that Dr. ADDISON will issue orders at once compelling the local authorities to engage efficient inspectors, and to order prosecutions wherever and whenever bad meat is offered for sale.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 22 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1932

ALL the auguries for the Bournemouth Conference appear to be good. Our local secretary, Mr. Charles Riddle, seems to have spared neither energy nor ability to render our…

Abstract

ALL the auguries for the Bournemouth Conference appear to be good. Our local secretary, Mr. Charles Riddle, seems to have spared neither energy nor ability to render our second visit to the town, whose libraries he initiated and has controlled for thirty‐seven years, useful and enjoyable. There will not be quite so many social events as usual, but that is appropriate in the national circumstances. There will be enough of all sorts of meetings to supply what the President of the A.L.A. describes as “the calling which collects and organizes books and other printed matter for the use and benefit of mankind and which brings together the reader and the printed word in a vital relationship.” We hope the discussions will be thorough, but without those long auto‐biographical speeches which are meant for home newspapers, that readers will make time for seeing the exhibitions, and that Bournemouth will be a source of health and pleasure to all our readers who can be there.

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1971

David Elliston Allen

Investigates the contribution of anthropology to marketing which has been thought of as being negligible. Reviews its potential as we move towards market analysis and…

Abstract

Investigates the contribution of anthropology to marketing which has been thought of as being negligible. Reviews its potential as we move towards market analysis and model building strategies for marketing. Suggests that it is likely to play a role in international marketing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1902

SO much interest has been aroused by our Editorial in the July number of The Library World, that we have decided to open a discussion of the project by all librarians who…

Abstract

SO much interest has been aroused by our Editorial in the July number of The Library World, that we have decided to open a discussion of the project by all librarians who may be interested in the subject. As will be gathered from the communications printed below, the proposal which we made has been received with favour, namely :—That, in order to secure the full value of his magnificent endowed libraries for the public benefit, Mr. Andrew Carnegie should follow his action of creating numerous libraries to a logical conclusion by establishing a College of Librarianship, from which competent officers could be obtained to organise and manage his libraries. Indeed, it is the only practical solution of the difficulty which must presently arise, unless it is Mr. Carnegie's desire that local authorities be left as heretofore, to appoint as librarians any political or local pet who happens to be in the ascendency at the moment.

Details

New Library World, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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