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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Kathleen W. Craver

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools…

Abstract

In the 1970s, the United States Congress enacted two statutes that have had dramatic and far‐reaching effects on the education of handicapped children by public schools. These two laws, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Education For All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (known as Public Law 94–142), have required local public school agencies to provide new eductional programs for thousands of handicapped children not previously served by the public schools. Counselors, principals, and teachers were quickly informed of the law's requirements and willingly began the task of main‐streaming and assimilating these children into various curricula. Their physical needs were attended to rapidly; their societal and emotional needs, unfortunately, lagged behind. Within the past seven years, there has been an increase in books, articles, and films specifically addressed to counseling the handicapped. Unlike past literature which focused only on the vocational aspect of rehabilitation counseling, current writing emphasizes personal counseling meant to assist a disabled child to participate fully in the problems and joys of daily living.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2010

Samuel Sinclair and Alice LoCicero

Since 9/11, 2001, protection from terrorism has become a poignant issue in the political spectrum, and some have argued that fears of terrorism have been manipulated for…

Abstract

Since 9/11, 2001, protection from terrorism has become a poignant issue in the political spectrum, and some have argued that fears of terrorism have been manipulated for political purposes. Contributing to a growing body of research, this study sought to test whether terrorism fears, and/or the impact of terror alerts, predicted overall trust in government in a sample of university undergraduates who completed the Perceptions of Terrorism Questionnaire Short‐Form (PTQ‐SF). Two psychological theories offer plausible explanations for this relationship: attachment theory and evolutionary psychology theory. Results indicate that both general terrorism fears and the impact of terror alerts specifically, are statistically significant predictors of trust in government, using separate hierarchical regression models after controlling for other factors. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed, as are directions for further research.

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Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Alice Keefer and Tomas Baiget

When an article on the history of the Internet was first suggested, our reaction was, “But doesn’t everyone already know how it started?” Having lived the experience “or…

3208

Abstract

When an article on the history of the Internet was first suggested, our reaction was, “But doesn’t everyone already know how it started?” Having lived the experience “or, perhaps more aptly, having survived it”, we had become like veterans of any major event who assume that certain facts will always be maintained in the collective memory. However, we ourselves ‐ from the US and Spain, respectively ‐ have noted with incredulity the mistaken answers given by members of the younger generations among our compatriots to such questions as: “In what Southeast Asian country did the US fight a war?” or “Who was Francisco Franco?”. While for some, the answers are burnt into the cerebral circuitry, the younger respondents treat the questions as so many Trivial Pursuit challenges, on the same par as “What team did Brazil beat in the 1962 World Cup?” or “What was the name of the boy actor who played Timmy in the original Lassie series?”.

Details

VINE, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Michelle McCarthy

This paper outlines some of the factors which are important in helping or hindering women with learning disabilities to experience their sexuality in a positive and…

237

Abstract

This paper outlines some of the factors which are important in helping or hindering women with learning disabilities to experience their sexuality in a positive and healthy way. Based on direct experience, the paper presents the factors which must be present for women with learning disabilities to enjoy their sexuality: making choices, giving consent, receiving information, experiencing mutuality, experiencing pleasure, having self‐esteem and having recourse to the law if abused. Conversely, the factors which need to be absent are coercion, oppression, guilt and shame, and unwanted physical consequences. The paper emphasises how important it is that women with learning disabilities and their supporters understand these factors.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Christine L. Borgman, Donald O. Case and Dorothy Ingebretsen

We have conducted a study of academic faculty use of databases for research, their need for evaluative guides to databases, and the appropriateness of currently‐available…

Abstract

We have conducted a study of academic faculty use of databases for research, their need for evaluative guides to databases, and the appropriateness of currently‐available guides. Although the response rate was low (19%), the follow‐up survey suggested only a minimal non‐response bias. Our findings suggest that academic faculty are typically unaware of the range of databases available and few recognize the need for databases in research. Of those faculty who do use databases, most delegate the searching to a librarian or an assistant, rather than performing the searches themselves. We identified thirty‐nine database guides; these tend to be descriptive rather than evaluative.

Details

Online Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

George Papanastasiou, Athanasios Drigas, Charalabos Skianis and Miltiadis D. Lytras

The purpose of this paper is to explore the integration of serious games (SGs) in the area of special educational needs in the last ten years (2007-2017).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the integration of serious games (SGs) in the area of special educational needs in the last ten years (2007-2017).

Design/methodology/approach

SGs indicate positive effects on students with special educational needs and promote a multi-sensory style of learning.

Findings

Research showed that SGs are able to keep K-12 education students with attention, memory and developmental disabilities engaged in classroom facilities scaffolding their learning through increased motivation, independence, autonomy and resultant self-esteem.

Research limitations/implications

Time constraints, cost and availability of appropriate games as well as the small sample of the individuals being investigated are some of the research limitations the paper refers to.

Practical implications

Learning through SGs has educational values that are based on learning concepts intrinsically motivating.

Social implications

Students with attention, memory and developmental disabilities demonstrate characteristics of engagement, creativity, control and communication.

Originality/value

SGs-based learning has proven its value added to students with attention, memory and executive control difficulties as well as mental or developmental disabilities engaging students better than when using traditional methods.

Details

Program, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Paola Mavriki and Maria Karyda

User profiling with big data raises significant issues regarding privacy. Privacy studies typically focus on individual privacy; however, in the era of big data analytics…

Abstract

Purpose

User profiling with big data raises significant issues regarding privacy. Privacy studies typically focus on individual privacy; however, in the era of big data analytics, users are also targeted as members of specific groups, thus challenging their collective privacy with unidentified implications. Overall, this paper aims to argue that in the age of big data, there is a need to consider the collective aspects of privacy as well and to develop new ways of calculating privacy risks and identify privacy threats that emerge.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing on a collective level, the authors conducted an extensive literature review related to information privacy and concepts of social identity. They also examined numerous automated data-driven profiling techniques analyzing at the same time the involved privacy issues for groups.

Findings

This paper identifies privacy threats for collective entities that stem from data-driven profiling, and it argues that privacy-preserving mechanisms are required to protect the privacy interests of groups as entities, independently of the interests of their individual members. Moreover, this paper concludes that collective privacy threats may be different from threats for individuals when they are not members of a group.

Originality/value

Although research evidence indicates that in the age of big data privacy as a collective issue is becoming increasingly important, the pluralist character of privacy has not yet been adequately explored. This paper contributes to filling this gap and provides new insights with regard to threats for group privacy and their impact on collective entities and society.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1909

THE following abstract in tabular form has been prepared by some junior members of the Islington Public Libraries staff for the use of candidates in Section V. of the…

Abstract

THE following abstract in tabular form has been prepared by some junior members of the Islington Public Libraries staff for the use of candidates in Section V. of the Library Association Examination. It does not pretend to do more than set out the chief provisions of the various Public Libraries Acts in a clear manner, as an aid to the memorization of the principal powers and duties conferred upon library authorities. The whole of the Acts can be purchased through any bookseller for 1s. 4½d., and every student of librarianship is advised to procure them.

Details

New Library World, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1955

In his Annual Report, Mr. W. A. Davenport, Chief Inspector of Weights and Measures for Buckinghamshire, includes a dissertation (full of wisdom, as we think) on the…

Abstract

In his Annual Report, Mr. W. A. Davenport, Chief Inspector of Weights and Measures for Buckinghamshire, includes a dissertation (full of wisdom, as we think) on the Merchandise Marks Act, which, he states, “are designed to achieve two distinct objects. The older and more important object is to ensure that goods shall not, with impunity, be sold as something better than they really are. The later and more restricted object is to help the sale of certain agricultural and fishery products of the United Kingdom in competition with imported goods of the same class. The first is attained under the 1887 Act, by prohibiting false claims of almost any kind ; the second, under the 1926 Act, by compelling a true disclosure of the country of origin where this is outside the United Kingdom. Neither of these Acts imposes a duty on the Council, but whilst the 1887 Act is open to be enforced by anyone, it is expressed that the 1926 Act may be enforced by Food and Drugs Authorities, a provision which has the effect of precluding its enforcement by anyone else.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 57 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Lee Knifton, Alice Walker and Neil Quinn

Stigma and discrimination towards people with mental health problems is a global issue, imposing a considerable public health burden in terms of social isolation, limited…

Abstract

Stigma and discrimination towards people with mental health problems is a global issue, imposing a considerable public health burden in terms of social isolation, limited life chances, delayed help‐seeking behaviour and stress. While numerous initiatives have been undertaken to address these issues, an evidence base for what works is still emerging. This paper explores the impact of 15 population‐level awareness workshops delivered over a five‐month period to 137 participants. These were employees drawn from workplaces identified as being important in the day‐to‐day lives of people with mental health problems. Evaluation approaches maximised specificity, sensitivity and anonymity and they assessed participant knowledge, attitude and behaviour. The workshops significantly improved participant knowledge. Attitude change was more complex with an overall significant improvement in attitudes, particularly in relation to unpredictability and recovery, but not dangerousness, which had more positive baseline attitudes. Social distance, a proxy for behavioural intent, had significant improvements in relation to ‘moderate’ social contact only. Qualitative feedback indicated that complex, unanticipated and positive messages had been absorbed by participants and influenced beliefs and behavioural intent. Service user narratives focusing on recovery were identified as the most valuable component of the intervention.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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