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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Claire de Motte, Di Bailey, Melanie Hunter and Alice L. Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to describe the pattern of self-harm (SH) and proven prison rule-breaking (PRB) behaviour in prisoners receiving treatment for personality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the pattern of self-harm (SH) and proven prison rule-breaking (PRB) behaviour in prisoners receiving treatment for personality disorders (PDs) within a high security prison.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative quantitative case study design supported the understanding of the frequency and pattern of SH and PRB behaviour across two stages of a PD treatment programme for 74 male prisoners. Data obtained from the prison’s records were analysed using dependent t-tests, χ2 test of independence and time-frequency analyses.

Findings

Inferential statistics showed that the frequency of SH and PRB behaviour statistically increased across two phases of the PD treatment programme; however, the method of SH or type of PRB behaviour engaged in did not change. Mapping the frequencies of incidents using a time-frequency analysis shows the patterns of both behaviours to be erratic, peaking in the latter phase of treatment, yet the frequency of incidents tended to decline over time.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore SH and PRB behaviours in men across two phases of a PD treatment programme. This study highlights the need for continued psychological support alongside the PD treatment programme with a focus on supporting men in treatment to effectively manage their SH and PRB behaviour.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Alice Bennett and Darren Johnson

In light of the clinical importance of understanding co-morbidity within offender populations, the purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence and comorbidities of…

Abstract

Purpose

In light of the clinical importance of understanding co-morbidity within offender populations, the purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence and comorbidities of clinical disorder (Axis I) and personality disorder (Axis II) within a sample of high risk, male offenders located in a high secure, prison-based personality disorder treatment service.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised clinical assessment data for both Axis I diagnoses (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV) and Axis II diagnoses (International Personality Disorder Examination) of 115 personality disordered offenders who met the criteria for the treatment service between 2004 and 2015.

Findings

Co-morbidity between Axis I and Axis II diagnoses was high, with 81 per cent of the sample having co-morbid personality disorder and clinical disorder diagnosis. The most prevalent Axis I disorder was substance misuse, and Axis II was antisocial, borderline, and paranoid personality disorder. Following χ2 analysis, Cluster A personality disorder demonstrated co-morbidity with both mood disorder and schizophrenia/other psychotic disorder. Paranoid, schizoid, narcissistic, and avoidant personality disorder demonstrated a level of co-morbidity with Axis I disorders. There was no association found between the clinical disorders of substance use and anxiety with any personality disorder within this sample.

Practical implications

In part these results suggest that certain Axis II disorders may increase the risk of lifetime Axis I disorders.

Originality/value

The findings of no co-morbidity between the clinical disorders of substance use and anxiety with any personality disorder within sample are inconsistent to previous findings.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Alice M. Tybout, Patrick Bennett and Brie Koenigs

In 2005, a wine snob in the critically acclaimed movie Sideways denounced merlot. Subsequently, sales of merlot, including sales for Terlato's Rutherford Hill merlot…

Abstract

In 2005, a wine snob in the critically acclaimed movie Sideways denounced merlot. Subsequently, sales of merlot, including sales for Terlato's Rutherford Hill merlot, declined significantly. Students are asked to evaluate three strategies---rebranding, cutting price, and launching television advertising---that Terlato is considering to reverse this decline. The case should be used with “Student Supplement: Terlato Wines International: Background Note on the U.S. Wine Market and Terlato Wines International,” Case #KEL359.

Students explore the challenge of managing a brand when external factors cause a decline in category demand. They also explore the role of pricing and advertising in managing a small, luxury brand.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2016

Alice Bennett and Melanie Hunter

This paper aims to describe: the need for substance misuse treatment with high risk, personality disordered prisoners, and the implementation of two evidence-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe: the need for substance misuse treatment with high risk, personality disordered prisoners, and the implementation of two evidence-based psychological interventions aimed at addressing substance misuse within a high secure, personality disorder treatment unit and potential future evaluation options.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to the literature base evidencing the need for substance misuse treatment with this population, the Iceberg and ‘InsideOut’ interventions are presented. These interventions adopt a risk reduction and health intervention approach respectively. This includes explanations of how they came to be implemented within a prison based personality disorder treatment service and potential ways to evaluate these services.

Findings

Evidence-based psychological interventions can be implemented for this population whilst being responsive to changing government priorities for substance misuse treatment. The organisation’s research strategy includes an intention to evaluate these interventions in order to inform future delivery.

Practical implications

The high levels of co-morbidity between personality disorder and substance misuse disorders in the high security prison estate highlights the need for substance related treatment for this population. Given the responsivity issues relevant to personality disordered offenders, the format of delivery of evidence-based psychological interventions has to be considered.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the application of evidence-based psychological interventions for substance use within a high secure, personality disordered population which has developed as a result of ministerial changes within the treatment of both substance misuse and personality disorder.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Alice L. Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to explore the range of personality disorder diagnoses and levels of psychopathy as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the range of personality disorder diagnoses and levels of psychopathy as assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) associated with treatment discontinuation in a sample of adult male prisoners.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 92 male offenders in a high secure prison personality disorder treatment unit was analysed. PCL-R and personality disorder diagnoses were predicted as being related to increased treatment dropout.

Findings

Having a diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder was related to treatment dropout, but PCL-R total scores were not. There was a trend for a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder being associated with remaining in treatment.

Research limitations/implications

The current study highlights that narcissistic personality disorder can be associated with treatment dropout, warranting further exploration as to why this is the case.

Practical implications

Managing responsivity issues for those presenting with a personality disorder diagnosis could be effective in maximising treatment engagement from this specific offender group.

Originality/value

Although treatment dropout has been explored previously, this is the first study to explore treatment dropout at a specialised unit designed specifically to provide treatment for this client group.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Alice L. Bennett

The purpose of this paper is to explore service-users’ hopes and expectations of a psychologically informed planned environment (PIPE) located in the high-security prison…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore service-users’ hopes and expectations of a psychologically informed planned environment (PIPE) located in the high-security prison estate.

Design/methodology/approach

A semi-structured interview was used to explore the hopes and expectations of five male Category A PIPE prisoners. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Analysis resulted in two overall themes: “Progression” and “Being Part of a Community”. Relevant sub-themes were considered to portray processes within these two wider themes.

Practical implications

In applying these findings to practice, this study provides evidence that places value on the current referral process which ascertains prisoners’ motivations to attend the PIPE.

Originality/value

This is the first known study that explores service-users’ hopes and expectations of the pilot PIPE service. The PIPEs are included within the recently introduced Offender Personality Disorder Pathway.

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Alice Larissa Bennett and Mark Moss

The purpose of this paper is to explore client‐reported functions of deliberate self‐injury for prisoners located within a dangerous and severe personality disorder site.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore client‐reported functions of deliberate self‐injury for prisoners located within a dangerous and severe personality disorder site.

Design/methodology/approach

As interviews produced in‐depth data indicating a very idiosyncratic experience of the function of deliberate self‐injury, interpretative phenomenological analysis was used within a small‐scale case study design.

Findings

Identified functions mirrored current quantitative research but few emerging themes were identified across the sample. Participants presented with varying levels of insight into their deliberate self‐injury.

Research limitations/implications

A small sample of young males was used within the study.

Originality/value

A “status‐seeking” function of deliberate self‐injury was also observed, which is not explicitly discussed within the current literature base. This study's findings can be of use to treatment providers for this population given their complex responsivity needs.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Carol A. Ireland and Neil Gredecki

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Neil Gredecki and Carol A. Ireland

Abstract

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1968

Gordon Bennett

The government brought to a halt the comprehensive reorganization of secondary education by its decision to cut the building programme. It announces now its intention to…

Abstract

The government brought to a halt the comprehensive reorganization of secondary education by its decision to cut the building programme. It announces now its intention to complete the reform by legislative action. Miss Alice Bacon, the Minister of State responsible for schools, made an announcement at the Labour Party Conference of the government's intention to introduce new legislation about secondary education. This has been interpreted by some commentators as an indication that having failed to find the necessary resources the government hopes to solve its problems by legislation: but the issue is more complicated than that. Miss Bacon also stated that the government will honour its commitment to raise the school‐leaving age in 1972‐73. But she did not announce a building programme to make all this realistic. How can the government possibly do all this?

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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