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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Ali Intezari, David J. Pauleen and Nazim Taskin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence knowledge processes and by extension organisational knowledge culture (KC).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence knowledge processes and by extension organisational knowledge culture (KC).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic model development approach based on an extensive literature review, the authors explore the notion of organisational KC and conceptualise a model that addresses the following research question: what factors affect employees’ values and beliefs about knowledge processes and by extension organisational KC?

Findings

This paper proposes that knowledge processes are interrelated and mutually enforcing activities, and that employee perceptions of various individual, group and organisational factors underpin employee values and beliefs about knowledge processes and help shape an organisation’s KC.

Research limitations/implications

The findings extend the understanding of the concept of KC and may point the way towards a unifying theory of knowledge management (KM) that can better account for the complexity and multi-dimensionality of knowledge processes and KC.

Practical implications

The paper provides important practical implications by explicitly accounting for the cultural aspects of the inextricably interrelated nature of the most common knowledge processes in KM initiatives.

Originality/value

KM research has examined a long and varied list of knowledge processes. This has arguably resulted in KM theorizing being fragmented or disintegrated. Whilst it is evident that organisational culture affects persons’ behaviour in the organisation, the impact of persons’ values and beliefs on knowledge processes as a whole remain understudied. This study provides a model of KC. Moreover, the paper offers a novel systematic approach to developing conceptual and theoretical models.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Ali Intezari and Simone Gressel

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework of how knowledge management (KM) systems can facilitate the incorporation of big data into strategic…

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4492

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework of how knowledge management (KM) systems can facilitate the incorporation of big data into strategic decisions. Advanced analytics are becoming increasingly critical in making strategic decisions in any organization from the private to public sectors and from for-profit companies to not-for-profit organizations. Despite the growing importance of capturing, sharing and implementing people’s knowledge in organizations, it is still unclear how big data and the need for advanced analytics can inform and, if necessary, reform the design and implementation of KM systems.

Design/methodology/approach

To address this gap, a combined approach has been applied. The KM and data analysis systems implemented by companies were analyzed, and the analysis was complemented by a review of the extant literature.

Findings

Four types of data-based decisions and a set of ground rules are identified toward enabling KM systems to handle big data and advanced analytics.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a practical framework that takes into account the diverse combinations of data-based decisions. Suggestions are provided about how KM systems can be reformed to facilitate the incorporation of big data and advanced analytics into organizations’ strategic decision-making.

Originality/value

This is the first typology of data-based decision-making considering advanced analytics.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ali Intezari, Nazim Taskin and David J. Pauleen

This study aims to identify the main knowledge processes associated with organizational knowledge culture. A diverse range of knowledge processes have been referred to in…

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3719

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the main knowledge processes associated with organizational knowledge culture. A diverse range of knowledge processes have been referred to in the extant literature, but little agreement exists on which knowledge processes are critical and should be supported by organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic literature review methodology, this study examined the primary literature – peer-reviewed and scholarly articles published in the top seven knowledge management and intellectual capital (KM/IC)-related journals.

Findings

The core knowledge processes have been identified – knowledge sharing, knowledge creation and knowledge implementation. The paper suggests that a strategy for implementing successful organizational KM initiatives requires precise understanding and effective management of the core knowledge infrastructures and processes. Although technology infrastructure is an important aspect of any KM initiative, the integration of knowledge into management decisions and practices relies on the extent to which the organizational culture supports or hinders knowledge processes.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of the study was on the articles published in the top seven KM/IC journals; important contributions in relevant publications in other KM journals, conference papers, books and professional reports may have been excluded.

Practical implications

Practitioners will benefit from a better understanding of knowledge processes involved in KM initiatives and investments. From a managerial perspective, the study offers an overview of the state of organizational knowledge culture research and suggests that for KM initiatives to be successful, the organization requires an integrated culture that is concerned with knowledge processes as a set of inextricably inter-related processes.

Originality/value

For the first time, a comprehensive list of diverse terms used in describing knowledge processes has been identified. The findings remove the conceptual ambiguity resulting from the inconsistent use of different terms for the same knowledge process by identifying the three major and overarching knowledge processes. Moreover, this study points to the need to attend to the inextricably interrelated nature of these three knowledge processes. Finally, this is the first time that a study provides evidence that shows the KM studies appear to be biased towards Knowledge sharing.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Morteza Namvar, Ali Intezari and Ghiyoung Im

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies…

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331

Abstract

Purpose

Business analytics (BA) has been a breakthrough technological development in recent years. Although scholars have suggested several solutions in using these technologies to facilitate decision-making, there are as of yet limited studies on how analysts, in practice, improve decision makers' understanding of business environments. This study uses sensemaking theory and proposes a model of how data analysts generate analytical outcomes to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an interpretive field study with thematic analysis. The authors conducted 32 interviews with data analysts and consultants in Australia and New Zealand. The authors then applied thematic analysis to the collected data.

Findings

The thematic analysis discovered four main sensegiving activities, including data integration, trustworthiness analysis, appropriateness analysis and alternative selection. The proposed model demonstrates how these activities support the properties of sensemaking and result in improved decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides strong empirical evidence for the theory development and practice of sensemaking. It brings together two distinct fields – sensemaking and business analytics – and demonstrates how the approaches advocated by these two fields could improve analytics applications. The findings also propose theoretical implications for information system development (ISD).

Practical implications

This study demonstrates how data analysts could use analytical tools and social mechanisms to improve decision makers' understanding of the business environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first known empirical study to conceptualize the theory of sensemaking in the context of BA and propose a model for analytical sensegiving in organizations.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Denis Dennehy, Ilias O. Pappas, Samuel Fosso Wamba and Katina Michael

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Muhammad Umar, Maqbool Hussain Sial, Syed Ahmad Ali, Muhammad Waseem Bari and Muhammad Ahmad

This paper aims to investigate the tacit knowledge-sharing framework among Pakistani academicians. The objective is to study trust and social networks as antecedents to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the tacit knowledge-sharing framework among Pakistani academicians. The objective is to study trust and social networks as antecedents to foster tacit knowledge sharing with the mediating role of commitment. Furthermore, the moderating role of organizational knowledge-sharing culture is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied a survey-based quantitative research design to test the proposed model. The nature of data are cross-sectional and collected with stratified random sampling among public sector higher education professionals of Pakistan. The total sample size for the present research is 247 respondents. The variance-based structural equation modeling technique by using Smart_PLS software is used for analysis.

Findings

Data analysis and results reveal that trust and social networks are significant predictors of tacit knowledge sharing among Pakistani academicians while commitment positively mediated the relationships. While the moderating role of organizational knowledge-sharing culture is also established.

Research limitations/implications

The current research explains tacit knowledge sharing among academics with fewer antecedents i.e. social network and trust with limited sample size and specific population. There is still a great deal of work to be done in this area. Hence, the study provides direction for including knowledge-oriented leadership and knowledge governance in the current framework. Moreover, the framework can be tested in different work settings for better generalization.

Practical implications

The study gives an important lead to practitioners for enhancing tacit knowledge sharing at the workplace through a robust social network of employees, building trust and boosting employees’ commitment, as well as through supportive organizational knowledge sharing culture.

Originality/value

The research comprehends the tacit knowledge sharing framework with theoretical arrangements of trust, social networks, commitment and culture in higher education workplace settings under the umbrella of social capital theory.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Muhammad Saleem Sumbal, Eric Tsui, Irfan Irfan, Muhammad Shujahat, Elaine Mosconi and Murad Ali

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate the role of big data in firms’ co-knowledge and value creation and to understand the underlying drivers behind value…

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1088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate the role of big data in firms’ co-knowledge and value creation and to understand the underlying drivers behind value creation through big data in the oil and gas industry by underscoring the role of firms’ capabilities, trends and challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an inductive approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior managers and analysts working in oil and gas companies across eight countries. The data collected from these key informants were then analysed using the qualitative data analysis software ATLAS.ti.

Findings

Value creation through big data is an important factor for enhancing performance. It has a positive impact on both tangible (organisational performance) and intangible (societal) aspects depending on the context. Oil and gas companies understand the importance of big data to creating value in their operations. However, implementing and using big data has been problematic. In this study, a framework was developed to show that factors such as the shortage of data experts, poor data quality, the risk of cyber-attacks and unsupportive organisational cultures impede its implementation and utilisation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study have implications for managers and executives implementing big data and creating value across various data-intensive industries. The research findings, are contextual, however, and should be applied cautiously.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the value creation literature in the big data context. The findings identify the key areas to be considered for the effective implementation and utilisation of big data in the oil and gas sector. This study addresses a broad but under-explored issue (i.e. knowledge creation from big data and its implementation) and strengthens the academic debate within this research stream.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Samia Jamshed and Nauman Majeed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional…

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6463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between team culture and team performance through the mediating role of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study advocated that team culture influences the knowledge sharing behavior of team members and the development of emotional intelligence skill at the team level. Further, it is hypothesized that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence positively influence team performance. By adopting a quantitative research design, data were gathered by using a survey questionnaire from 535 respondents representing 95 teams working in private health-care institutions.

Findings

The findings significantly indicated that knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence influence team working. Furthermore, this study confirms the strong association between team culture and team performance through the lens of knowledge sharing and team emotional intelligence.

Practical implications

This investigation offers observational proof to health-care services to familiarize workers with the ability of emotional intelligence and urge them to share knowledge for enhanced team performance. The study provides in-depth understanding to managers and leaders in health-care institutions to decentralize culture at the team level for endorsement of knowledge sharing behavior.

Originality/value

This is amongst one of the initial studies investigating team members making a pool of knowledge to realize potential gains enormously and influenced by the emotional intelligence. Team culture set a platform to share knowledge which is considered one of the principal execution conduct essential for accomplishing and managing team adequacy in a sensitive health-care environment.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Anselmo Ferreira Vasconcelos

Anecdotal evidence suggests the growing need for wise people and organizations, which are fully dedicated to building up the greater good more than ever before. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Anecdotal evidence suggests the growing need for wise people and organizations, which are fully dedicated to building up the greater good more than ever before. The purpose of this study is to broaden the role of wisdom by triggering an aware and genuine concern toward building wisdom capital (WC) within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

First, this endeavor draws upon key issues of wisdom theory literature, namely, the nuances of its general aspects, basic components, other relevant issues and practical wisdom construct. Second, it suggests a conceptual model through which both workers and organizations may help to build up a solid WC. In addition, some research propositions are also suggested. Finally, it proposes some avenues of research and presents the conclusions.

Findings

The notion of WC may help individuals and organizations to keep the right path. To some degree, it reminds us that individuals exist to contribute to something greater than themselves through their potentialities, skills and capabilities. The theoretical background of WC urges the individuals to engage in meaningful projects and challenges to improve the human condition.

Practical implications

Seemingly, managers and CEOs still have a narrow view about what wisdom embraces. Accordingly, it is important to keep in mind that to enhance individual wisdom capital (IWC), concerted efforts are required toward human training and development to improve the organizations and their decision-making systems. Overall, this frame suggests that it is vital to accumulate a WC for the survival and thriving of individuals and organizations. As theorized, WC is a very useful, rich and sense-making form of capital to gather.

Originality/value

Overall, this article attempts to broaden wisdom theory within organizations by presenting the definition, meaning and scope of WC and its by-products, i.e. IWC and organizational wisdom capital. Hence, it focuses on two levels and describes specific means and ends related to each stance. At last, the proposed variables may be carefully managed and monitored to engender a new business paradigm, that is, the general well-being.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Sigi Goode and David Lacey

This paper aims to assert that knowledge of organisational weaknesses, vulnerabilities and compromise points (here termed “dark knowledge”), is just as critical to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assert that knowledge of organisational weaknesses, vulnerabilities and compromise points (here termed “dark knowledge”), is just as critical to organisational integrity and hence, must also be managed in a conventional knowledge management sense. However, such dark knowledge is typically difficult to identify and accordingly, few studies have attempted to conceptualise this view.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a background of fraud diamond theory, the authors examine this dark knowledge using a case study analysis of fraud at a large Asia-Pacific telecommunications provider. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with the firm’s fraud unit.

Findings

The authors identify six components of dark knowledge, being artefactual knowledge, consequential knowledge, knowledge of opportunity, knowledge of experimentality, knowledge of identity and action and knowledge of alternativity.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper to identify a knowledge type based on organisational compromises and vulnerabilities. The paper shows that accounts of organisational weakness can yet provide knowledge insights.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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