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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Iyad Ibrahim Shaqura, Radwan Baroud and Ali Akbari Sari

This study aimed to assess interprofessional collaboration among healthcare professionals at governmental hospitals in the Gaza Strip.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to assess interprofessional collaboration among healthcare professionals at governmental hospitals in the Gaza Strip.

Design/methodology/approach

This is qualitative study at six governmental hospitals, four general and two specialized. Thirty healthcare professionals were purposefully recruited to seven semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions. Analysis was carried out using the open-coded thematic analysis.

Findings

Eight themes had been identified: (1) unity of goals among health professionals, (2) physicians as team leaders, (3) patient involvement, (4) decision-making and conflict management (5) relationships among professionals, (6) general responsibilities and autonomy, (7) mutual trust and information exchange and (8) collaboration with the community to coordinate care. The first three themes were impediments, whilst “decision-making and conflict resolution” was a significant enabler of interprofessional collaboration. The last four themes were the lowest in their level and varied from one hospital to another as well.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation in this study was the number of participants; a relatively large sample might be needed for more data saturation. Therefore, health professionals from diverse backgrounds and different managerial levels have been recruited.

Practical implications

Policymakers could rely upon the recommendations in strengthening the enablers of interprofessional collaboration and overcoming barriers, both on system, organizational and individual levels.

Originality/value

This study was conducted at six hospitals of different specialties and sizes, and health professionals from different six professions have been recruited. In addition, two qualitative tools were used, interviews and focus group discussions.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Iyad Ibrahim Shaqura, Radwan Baroud and Ali Akbari Sari

This study aimed at assessing the current interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among healthcare professionals at the public hospitals in the Gaza Strip in 2016 through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at assessing the current interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among healthcare professionals at the public hospitals in the Gaza Strip in 2016 through measuring the average level, and also examind the influence of professionals' characteristics on their collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative, cross-sectional study using a valid and reliable self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale was conducted. A total of 323 participants from six health professions completed the questionnaire which was analyzed using SPSS version 20 by applying descriptive tests, t-test, ANOVA and inferential analysis (Scheffe test); the statistical significance was considered at p = 0.05.

Findings

The interprofessional collaboration was moderate (71.66%). “General relationships” elicited the highest mean score (3.943) due to participants' belief in its importance, whereas “community linkages and coordination of care” was the lowest (3.181) as a result of the restricted policy in this regard. Gender, age, profession and position have shown statistically significant variables on the overall collaboration. In short, there are differences in the performance of IPC domains and even within items of the same domain.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted at only public hospitals; in addition, it was a cross-sectional study, so the causation relationships are difficult to assess. Moreover, the questionnaire was on self-administered basis which might result in misread or misunderstood bias.

Originality/value

This was the first study in the Palestinian context on collaboration between multiple professions using a comprehensive and reliable assessment tool.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Moslem Soofi, Ali Akbari Sari, Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh and Farid Najafi

Behavioral economic analysis of health-related behavior is a potentially useful approach to study and control non-communicable diseases. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Behavioral economic analysis of health-related behavior is a potentially useful approach to study and control non-communicable diseases. The purpose of this paper is to explore the time preferences of individuals and its impact on obesity in an adult population of Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was completed by 792 individuals who were randomly selected from the participants of an ongoing national Prospective Epidemiological Research Studies in IrAN cohort study in West of Iran. The quasi-hyperbolic discounting model was used to estimate the parameters of time preferences and a probit regression model was used to explore the correlation between obesity and time preferences.

Findings

There was a statistically significant correlation between obesity and both the long-run patience and present-biased preferences of participants. Individuals with a low level of long-run patience were 10.2 percentage points more likely to be obese compared to individuals with a high level of long-run patience. The probability of being obese increased by 11 percentage points in present-biased individuals compared to future biased individuals.

Originality/value

The long-run patience and time inconsistent preferences were significant determinants of obesity. Considering the time-inconsistent preferences in the development of policies to change obesity-related behavior among adults might increase the success rate of the interventions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Mohammad Arab, Arash Rashidian, Abolghasem Pourreza, Maryam Tajvar, Roghayeh Khabiri Nemati, Ali Akbari Sari and Abbas Rahimi Forooshani

Valid and reliable measures are required for assessing patient satisfaction meaningfully. The purpose of this paper was to develop and validate a Persian-language…

Abstract

Purpose

Valid and reliable measures are required for assessing patient satisfaction meaningfully. The purpose of this paper was to develop and validate a Persian-language in-patient satisfaction questionnaire for patients discharged from Iranian medical and surgical services.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional survey included 400 patients randomly selected from six Tehran hospitals. A total of 405 patients responded to the questionnaire (76.3 percent response). To assess inter-item reliability and construct validity, factor analysis was carried out. Items belonging to each factor and their Cronbach's alpha coefficient were calculated.

Findings

A total of seven dimensions were identified: doctor-patient communication; nursing care; convenience; visitors; cleanliness; costs; and general satisfaction. Together, these dimensions explained 60 percent of the variance. All items, except three, revealed loadings above 0.4, while Cronbach's alpha exceeded 0.8 for all dimensions, except visitors (0.66). Patient satisfaction levels were relatively high.

Practical implications

Results must be interpreted cautiously owing to high satisfaction, which should not be considered as comprehensive evidence of high performance without important additional service-performance information. Qualitative studies are recommended to complement the authors' quantitative satisfaction study.

Originality/value

The patient satisfaction questionnaire strives to be a valid and reliable instrument for assessing in-patient satisfaction with hospital services in Iran.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Ali Kazemi Karyani, Shahin Soltani, Heshmatollah Asadi, Mohammad Bazyar, Zahra Mohammadi, Neshat Kazemzadeh and Bijan Nouri

Appropriate access to formally-trained health workers for people living in rural and underdeveloped areas is a continuing challenge worldwide. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Appropriate access to formally-trained health workers for people living in rural and underdeveloped areas is a continuing challenge worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the willingness of formally-trained health workers to practice in underdeveloped areas and its main determinants among medical students in the western provinces of Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 753 medical students from four provinces in western Iran (Kermanshah, Ilam, Lorestan and Kurdistan) were surveyed cross-sectionally in 2017. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, willingness to practice in underdeveloped areas, intrinsic (e.g. desire to help others and self-interest in medicine) and extrinsic (e.g. the high income of physicians and social prestige) motivations of the study population. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the main determinants of willingness to practice in underdeveloped areas among medical students after their graduation.

Findings

The results indicated that 58.3 percent of students were willing to practice in underdeveloped areas. While 59 percent of the study population had a strong extrinsic motivation to study medicine, the remaining 41 percent of the study population had a strong intrinsic motivation to study medicine. The logistic regression results indicated that low parental professional and educational status, an experience of living in rural areas and having strong intrinsic motivation were associated with greater willingness to practice in underdeveloped areas.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the willingness to practice in underdeveloped areas and its main determinants among medical students in the west of Iran.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Mohsen Pakdaman, Sara Geravandi, Ali Hejazi, Mobin Salehi and Mahboobeh Davoodifar

Currently, the health system is a treatment-oriented system focused on service providers. In this system, the main focus is on the health market, with little attention on…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, the health system is a treatment-oriented system focused on service providers. In this system, the main focus is on the health market, with little attention on insured. One way to get out of existing conditions is to empower the insured in order to involve them actively in maintaining and improving health. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was done using the content analysis method. Based on the purposive sampling method and theoretical saturation criterion, 24 individuals including 12 health insurance experts and 12 insured participated in the study in 2018. The semi-structured interview method was used to collect data. Data were analyzed using MAXQDA10 software.

Findings

Having analyzed the interviews, 750 codes were obtained. These codes were categorized into two categories of “insurance experts” and “insured” and ten subcategories of “informing and educating, cost reduction, intersectional activities, expectations from the insured, services package, access to services, inability to pay costs, participation, and expectations from the insurance organization.”

Originality/value

This qualitative study was conducted to assess and determine the effective strategies for empowering the insured under health insurance. The results of this study are helpful to the health insurance organizations and health decision makers to detect the effective ways to develop the quality of insurance services, improve the status of insured, and increase access to health care goods and services.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Mohammadreza Akbari and Robert McClelland

The purpose of this research is to provide a systematic insight into corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate citizenship (CC) in supply chain development, by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide a systematic insight into corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate citizenship (CC) in supply chain development, by analyzing the current literature, contemporary concepts, data and gaps for future discipline research.

Design/methodology/approach

This research identifies information from existing academic journals and investigates research designs and methods, data analysis techniques, industry involvement and geographic locations. Information regarding university affiliation, publishers, authors, year of publication is also documented. A collection of online databases from 2001 to 2018 were explored, using the keywords “corporate social responsibility”, “corporate citizenship” and “supply chain” in their title and abstract, to deliver an inclusive listing of journal articles in this discipline area. Based on this approach, a total of 164 articles were found, and information on a chain of variables was collected.

Findings

There has been visible growth in published articles over the last 18 years regarding supply chain sustainability, CSR and CC. Analysis of the data collected shows that only five literature reviews have been published in this area. Further, key findings include 41% of publications were narrowly focused on four sectors of industry, leaving gaps in the research. 85% centered on the survey and conceptual model, leaving an additional gap for future research. Finally, developing and developed nation status should be delineated, researched and analyzed based on further segmentation of the industry by region.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to reviewing only academic and professional articles available from Emerald, Elsevier, Wiley, Sage, Taylor and Francis, Springer, Scopus, JSTOR and EBSCO containing the words “corporate social responsibility”, “corporate citizenship” and “supply chain” in the title and abstract.

Originality/value

This assessment provides an enhanced appreciation of the current practices of current research and offers further directions within the CSR and CC in supply chain sustainable development.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Satar Rezaei, Abraha Woldemichael, Mohammad Hajizadeh and Ali Kazemi Karyani

Protecting households against financial risks of healthcare services is one of the main functions of health systems. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pooled…

Abstract

Purpose

Protecting households against financial risks of healthcare services is one of the main functions of health systems. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pooled estimate of the prevalence of catastrophic healthcare expenditures (CHE) among households in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

Both international (PubMed, Scopus and Clarivate Analytics (previously known as the Institute for Scientific Information)) and Iranian (Scientific Information Database, Iranmedex and Magiran) scientific databases were searched for published studies on CHE among Iranian households. The following keywords in Persian and English language were used as keywords for the search: “catastrophic healthcare costs,” “catastrophic health costs,” “impoverishment due to health costs,” “fair financial contribution,” “prevalence,” “frequency” and “Iran” with and without “health system”. The I2-test and χ2-based Q-test suggested heterogeneity in the reported prevalence among the qualified studies; thus, a random-effects model was used to estimate the overall prevalence of CHE among households in Iran.

Findings

A total of 24 studies with a cumulative sample of 301,097 households were included in the study. The estimated pooled prevalence of CHE among households was 7 percent (95 percent confidence interval: 6–8 percent). Meta-regression analysis indicated that the prevalence of CHE was inversely related to the sample size (p<0.05). The results did not suggest a significant association between the prevalence of CHE and the year of data collection.

Originality/value

The findings revealed that the prevalence of CHE among Iranian households is significantly higher than 1 percent, which is the goal set out in Iran’s fourth five-year development plan. This warrants further policy interventions to protect households from incurring CHE in Iran.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Peivand Bastani, Mostafa Sheykhotayefeh, Ali Tahernezhad, Seyyed Mostafa Hakimzadeh and Samaneh Rikhtegaran

Healthcare governance places medical ethics at the forefront of defining and maintaining the quality of care. Examples of serious ethical issues include sexual abuse of…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare governance places medical ethics at the forefront of defining and maintaining the quality of care. Examples of serious ethical issues include sexual abuse of patients (Dubois, Walsh, Chibnall et al., 2017), criminal prescription of opioids (Johnson, 2019) and unnecessary surgical procedures (Tayade and Dalvi, 2016) or shortages in service delivery because of little knowledge or experience especially during pandemic outbreaks (Hay-David et al., 2020). In many cases involving medical ethics, patients are identified as the first victims; however, this study aimed to consider clinicians and other healthcare practitioners as other probable victims (Ozeke et al., 2019).

Design/methodology/approach

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that tens of millions of patients worldwide suffer disabling injuries or death every year due to unsafe medical practices and services. Nearly, one in ten patients is harmed due to preventable causes while receiving health care in well-funded and technologically advanced hospital settings (WHO, 2016). Much less is known about the burden of unsafe care in non-hospital settings, where most healthcare services are delivered (Jha et al., 2013). Furthermore, there is little evidence concerning the burden of unsafe care in developing countries, where the risk of harm to patients is likely to be greater, due to limitations in infrastructure, technologies and human resources (Elmontsri et al., 2018).

Findings

While these problems are endemic in health care, they are exacerbated in times of health and social crises such as the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This pandemic has few precedents, being most closely paralleled with the global influenza pandemic of 1918 (Terry, 2020). Initially compared to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2002–2003 (Parrym, 2003), COVID-19 is already proving much more deadly. The WHO’s estimates of the number of SARS cases from the start of the outbreak in 2002, until it was brought under control in July 2003, was 8,437 cumulative cases, with 813 deaths (WHO, 2003). The European Center for disease prevention and Control estimated that as of May 15, 2020, that 4,405,680 cases of COVID-19 have been reported with 302,115 deaths (ECDC, 2020)

Research limitations/implications

The outbreak of COVID-19 was declared in February 2020 in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and up to March 2020, the cases of morbidity reached 12,729, with 611 deaths (Bedasht, 2020). The current figure at the time of editing (May 16, 2020) is 118,392 cases, with 6,937 deaths (Worldometer, 2020). Acting in cognizance of its ethical responsibility to the citizens of Iran, the Iranian government has taken the following action to attempt to mitigate the deleterious effects of the virus: in each province, one or more hospitals have been evacuated and allocated to patients with pulmonary problems with suspected to COVID-19. Access to intensive care units and specialist equipment is a primary ethical issue that concerns the Iranian healthcare system. The issue is exacerbated by the knowledge that these facilities are not distributed equitably in the country. Therefore, equity is the first ethical concern in this situation.

Practical implications

All nurses, clinicians, practitioners and specialists have been asked to volunteer their services in hospitals in the most infected areas. This raises ethical concerns about access to personal protective equipment (PPE) such as appropriate masks, gowns, gloves and other equipment to protect healthcare workers from infection. Access to PPE was restricted because of government failure to stockpile the necessary amount of disposable medical equipment. This was related to lack of domestic capacity to produce the equipment and problems accessing it internationally due to political-economic sanctions that were imposed on Iran by the USA and some European countries. Such shortages can quickly lead to a catastrophic situation; current evidence demonstrates that about 40% of healthcare workers are vulnerable to the COVID-19 infection (Behdasht, 2020). However, it should be noted that this is not a problem limited to Iran. As of March 2020, the WHO was already warning about PPE shortages and the dangers this posed for healthcare workers around the world (WHO, 2020).

Social implications

A Disaster Committee was created by the Iranian Ministry of Health to take responsibility for decision-making and daily information sharing to the community. The ethical dilemma that arises in terms of reporting the situation is the conflict between transparently presenting accurate and timely information and the creation of public panic and fear that this may cause in the community.

Originality/value

As a steward for public health, the Ministry of Health was afforded direct responsibility to maintain intra-sector relationships and leadership with other organizations such as political executive organizations, municipalities, military agencies, schools, universities and other public organizations to reach consensus on the best methods of controlling the COVID-19 outbreak. An important ethical issue is found in potential areas of conflict between the therapeutic and preventive roles of the Ministry of Health and those related to public health and the civil administrations.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Hamed Barjesteh, Elham Movafaghardestani and Ahmad Modaberi

COVID-19’s attack on the system of education left the learning of many students in limbo. For minimizing this effect, the current study sought to probe how Mobile-Assisted…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19’s attack on the system of education left the learning of many students in limbo. For minimizing this effect, the current study sought to probe how Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL) can facilitate English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners’ vocabulary knowledge. In so doing, a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest research design was adopted to check the effect of a newly developed application (i.e. visual vocabulary learning, hereafter VVL) in an EFL classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

To complying with the objective, a number of intermediate students (N = 40) were considered to participate in the study. They were assigned into a visual learning group (VLG) and a nonvisual learning group (NVLG) comprising 20 students in each. The VLG was directed to learn vocabulary by a VVL, and the NVG, a conventional method was employed for vocabulary instruction. An independent samples t-test was run to screen the efficacy of the intervention.

Findings

The finding revealed that participants in the VLG outperformed significantly in the posttest. The finding is beneficial for EFL teachers, syllabus designers, and material developers to take advantage of mobile applications in teaching vocabulary.

Originality/value

This study was conducted during COVID 19 between two groups in Iran.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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