Search results

1 – 10 of 40
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Alfredo Jiménez and Ilan Alon

While common sense suggests that corruption will likely have a negative impact on the economy as it raises the cost of doing business, research on the topic showed inconsistent…

Abstract

Purpose

While common sense suggests that corruption will likely have a negative impact on the economy as it raises the cost of doing business, research on the topic showed inconsistent results (positive, negative and neutral). This paper aims to verify whether corruption has a “grease” or “sand” effect on the wheels of entrepreneurial rates and under which conditions corruption will have stronger or weaker effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Using institutional theory as the basis for the hypotheses, generalized least squares estimation is conducted to empirically examine the role of corruption and political discretion in entrepreneurship in a sample of 93 countries.

Findings

Countries with higher levels of corruption are associated with lower levels of firm creation. However, this negative effect of corruption is weaker when there are higher levels of political discretion.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation of the moderating effect of political discretion on the negative impact of corruption on entrepreneurship.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Secil Bayraktar and Alfredo Jiménez

Drawing from conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study empirically tests the impact of transformational leadership on commitment to and intention to support…

3853

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study empirically tests the impact of transformational leadership on commitment to and intention to support organizational change, proposing self-efficacy as a mediating mechanism. This study also aims to study whether the extent of change in the organization moderates the proposed relationship between transformational leadership, self-efficacy and change reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with a sample of 298 employees going through a major organizational change. The proposed moderated mediation relationship was tested by using PROCESS macro.

Findings

The findings showed that self-efficacy mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and reactions to change. Moreover, the extent of changes experienced by the employees moderated the relationship between self-efficacy and outcome variables. In other words, in high change contexts, self-efficacy appeared as a more salient and instrumental resource leading to positive reactions.

Practical implications

The results guide change managers to display a transformational leadership style to enhance self-efficacy of change recipients to generate positive attitudes and behaviors during change. Also, this study shows that self-efficacy particularly gains importance when the extent of change is high.

Originality/value

This study makes several important contributions to the organizational change literature. First, it shows that leaders play a crucial role in generating resources that enhance employees' positive reactions to change. Second, the conditional factor of the extent of change has not received much attention in the literature. This study raises attention to the fact that the importance of such resources may differ across low versus high extent of change contexts.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Alfredo Jiménez and Torbjørn Bjorvatn

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the core literature on political risk and to suggest avenues for future research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the core literature on political risk and to suggest avenues for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying bibliometric analysis as a starting point, this systematic review identifies the current core body of literature on political risk and uncovers the theoretical building blocks of the research field.

Findings

A synthesis of the key literature reveals three broad analytical foci: the sources of political risk; the effects of political risk; and actors’ (countries, industries, firms and projects) vulnerabilities, capabilities and responses to political risk.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose a unifying conceptual framework for political risk research.

Practical implications

The paper provides managers with a tool kit to analyse political risk. Moreover, it aids policy-makers in addressing political risk in a comprehensive manner.

Originality/value

The paper represents the first systematic review of the political risk literature in over 30 years. By offering an integrated theoretical framework, it paves the way for new insights into an increasingly topical field.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Alfredo Jiménez, Secil Bayraktar, Jeoung Yul Lee and Seong-Jin Choi

This paper aims to investigate the multi-faceted impact of host country risks on the success of private participation in infrastructure projects. The authors make a distinction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the multi-faceted impact of host country risks on the success of private participation in infrastructure projects. The authors make a distinction between exogenous and endogenous risks, differentiating those that are completely beyond the control of the firm from those in which firms might exert some degree of influence to reduce the negative repercussions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on logistic regression analyses, the authors analyze a sample of 10,350 private participation in infrastructure projects in 126 countries from 1997 to 2014.

Findings

The authors find that higher levels of exogenous risk are associated with a lower probability of project success, whereas they find no significant effect for endogenous risk.

Originality/value

By pointing to this differential effect, this study makes a contribution to the current debate in the literature on private participation projects.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Jeoung Yul Lee, Joong In Kim, Alfredo Jiménez and Alessandro Biraglia

This study examines the impact of situational and stable animosities on quality evaluation and purchase intention while also testing the moderating effects of within- and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of situational and stable animosities on quality evaluation and purchase intention while also testing the moderating effects of within- and cross-country cultural distance. It focuses on the case of the US THAAD missile defense system deployment in South Korea (hereafter, Korea) and investigates how the resulting Chinese consumers' animosity affects their quality evaluation of, and purchase intention toward, Korean cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a quantitative approach based on a survey and structural equation modeling. The sample comprises 376 Chinese consumers from 19 Chinese regions.

Findings

The results indicate that both stable and situational animosities are negatively associated with purchase intention toward Korean cosmetics. However, their effects on quality evaluation are different. While stable animosity is negatively related to product quality evaluation, situational animosity has no such negative association. Finally, the cultural distance between Chinese regions and Korea strengthens the negative relationship between stable and situational animosities and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes by better unraveling the effects of stable and situational animosities on perceived product quality. The empirical context is unique because it allows the authors to investigate the relationship between Chinese antagonism toward the THAAD deployment in Korea and Chinese consumers' stable and situational animosities in terms of their quality evaluation of, and purchase intention toward, imported Korean cosmetics. Hence, this study contributes to the literature on consumer animosity by empirically testing the moderating effect of within- and cross-country cultural distance on the relationship between stable and situational animosities and purchase intention.

Practical implications

The study has relevant practical implications, notably for Korean exporters' marketing management and within- and cross-cultural management. The results suggest that countermeasures are needed because Chinese consumers' stable and situational animosities are negatively related to their purchase intention toward Korean cosmetics. Moreover, the findings provide the insight that when foreign firms export culture-sensitive products to a large, multicultural country, their managers should pay attention to within- and cross-cultural differences simultaneously.

Originality/value

Previous studies have shown that the effects of animosity on product evaluation and purchase intention differ depending on the animosity dimension, product type, country and the situation causing animosity, among others. However, the existing literature on animosity has neglected the reality that within-cultural differences in a single large emerging market are relevant to explaining the concept of animosity and its effect on the purchase intention toward culture-sensitive products. Furthermore, none of the animosity studies have touched on the important moderating role of within- and cross-cultural differences between a large and multicultural importing country and a brand's home country in this manner. Therefore, the study fills this gap by empirically examining whether different moderating effects of stable and situational animosities exist for a specific conflict situation caused by a military issue and investigates the causes of these different effects.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2019

Nathaniel C. Lupton, Alfredo Jiménez, Secil Bayraktar and Dimitrios Tsagdis

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of climate risk on the success vs failure of foreign direct investments (FDIs) in private participation infrastructure (PPI…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of climate risk on the success vs failure of foreign direct investments (FDIs) in private participation infrastructure (PPI) projects. The authors also consider the extent to which project-level characteristics mitigate such risks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors study a sample from the World Bank covering 18,846 projects in 111 countries from 2004 to 2013. The authors apply logistic regressions to determine the impact of climate risk and mitigating project characteristics on project failure.

Findings

The authors find that higher levels of climate risk at the host country level are associated with higher risk of project failure. The authors also find that the disadvantage of higher climate risk is weakened by two project-level characteristics, namely, the inclusion of host government ownership in the project consortium and the size of the project.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the current debate about the impact of climate risks on international business ventures. The authors demonstrate that climate risk is a locational disadvantage for FDI in PPI projects. The authors establish that the “fittest” projects in locations characterized by higher climate risk tend to be those that involve host government participation in their ownership structure as well as those of larger sizes.

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2023

Cristina Pérez-Pérez, Diana Benito-Osorio, Alfredo Jimenez and Secil Bayraktar

The Sharing Economy (SE) has turned around the concepts of ownership and access, promoting not only an alternative consumption method, but also a more sustainable one. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

The Sharing Economy (SE) has turned around the concepts of ownership and access, promoting not only an alternative consumption method, but also a more sustainable one. Using digital platforms, this phenomenon expects to achieve a better use of the idle capacity of resources, promote meaningful and trusting communities and contribute to reducing the environmental harm. The huge increase of popularity of this model has lined up with the Sustainable Development Goals proclamation, and the commitment from governments with the search for more sustainable models. This study analyzes the relationship of the SE with sustainability in general, and the Sustainable Development Goals in specific.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the analysis of the action plans proposed by governments and the expected contributions of sharing platforms to sustainability, the authors analyze the improvements and assistance that the Sharing Economy could offer to countries.

Findings

The main findings suggest that the SE can assist countries to achieve their sustainability goals and to further advance towards a more sustainable consumption and living model in order to fulfill the Sustainable Development Goals.

Originality/value

Although this topic is still to be further developed, the SE seems to be fulfilling the expectations as the path towards sustainability.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Saba Haider, Mian Sajid Nazir, Alfredo Jiménez and Muhammad Ali Jibran Qamar

In this paper the authors examine evidence on exchange rate predictability through commodity prices for a set of countries categorized as commodity import- and export-dependent…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the authors examine evidence on exchange rate predictability through commodity prices for a set of countries categorized as commodity import- and export-dependent developed and emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform in-sample and out-of-sample forecasting analysis. The commodity prices are modeled to predict the exchange rate and to analyze whether this commodity price model can perform better than the random walk model (RWM) or not. These two models are compared and evaluated in terms of exchange rate forecasting abilities based on mean squared forecast error and Theil inequality coefficient.

Findings

The authors find that primary commodity prices better predict exchange rates in almost two-thirds of export-dependent developed countries. In contrast, the RWM shows superior performance in the majority of export-dependent emerging, import-dependent emerging and developed countries.

Originality/value

Previous studies examined the exchange rate of commodity export-dependent developed countries mainly. This study examines both developed and emerging countries and finds for which one the changes in prices of export commodities (in case of commodity export-dependent country) or prices of major importing commodities (in case of import-dependent countries) can significantly predict the exchange rate.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Johannes Marcelus Kraak, Marcello Russo and Alfredo Jiménez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work–life balance (WLB) inducements of the psychological contract on three work-related outcomes for a sample of Dutch older…

2102

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work–life balance (WLB) inducements of the psychological contract on three work-related outcomes for a sample of Dutch older workers: psychological contract breach, turnover intentions and intentions to participate in development activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs polynomial regression and response surface methodology.

Findings

Results show that the volume at which fulfillment occurs is important in predicting feelings of psychological contract violation and intentions to engage in development activities but that this relationship is not straightforward for turnover intentions. Furthermore, under- and over-fulfillment have different relationships with intentions to participate in development activities than previous literature suggests. Additionally, gender moderates a number of the relationships in this study.

Originality/value

This study provides detailed insights regarding the dynamics between promised and delivered WLB inducements and outcomes for a sample of older workers instead of presenting generalized differences between several age groups.

Article
Publication date: 18 July 2024

Cristina Di Giusto Valle, María-Camino Escolar-Llamazares, Tamara de la Torre Cruz, M. Isabel Luis Rico, Carmen Palmero Cámara and Alfredo Jiménez

The efficiency of an educational program on entrepreneurial competence, Training the Potential Entrepreneur. Generation of an Educational Model for Entrepreneurial Identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The efficiency of an educational program on entrepreneurial competence, Training the Potential Entrepreneur. Generation of an Educational Model for Entrepreneurial Identify (PEIEO) is evaluated in this study.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre and post intervention tests were administered to an Experimental Group (EG) and a Control Group (CG). Moreover, four hypotheses are proposed (H1, H2, H3, H4) and tested on a sample of 1036 Spanish students. The following instruments were applied: Attitude Towards Entrepreneurship-Spanish adaption; Measurement Scale of Personal Initiative in Educational Settings and Scale of General Self-Efficacy. ANCOVA and the Student's t-test were applied to the results.

Findings

The results show that training in entrepreneurial identity increases the entrepreneurial potential of young people (H1). A notable increase in proactivity and being a self-starter was observed with regard to personal initiative within the EG, and for self-efficacy (H3) both of which were predictors of entrepreneurial identity. Gender was likewise a predictor (H4).

Practical implications

Young people attending the PElEO training program in entrepreneurial potential increased their levels of entrepreneurial identity, thereby confirming the effectiveness of the program.

Originality/value

The program (PEIEO) is based on the development of entrepreneurial potential, a dimension that generates entrepreneurial identity (creativity, leadership, achievement and personal control).

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

1 – 10 of 40