Search results

1 – 10 of 44
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Bernard C. Reimann

The major objective of any business organization should be to create value for its stockholders or owners. If the stock of a publicly held corporation does not provide its…

Abstract

The major objective of any business organization should be to create value for its stockholders or owners. If the stock of a publicly held corporation does not provide its shareholders with a return that increases their wealth, that corporation is not meeting its most fundamental obligation.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Alfred Rappaport

Strategic plans need to be evaluated in rational economic terms. Earnings per share and book ROI no longer do the job. What is needed, the author contends, is a new…

1434

Abstract

Strategic plans need to be evaluated in rational economic terms. Earnings per share and book ROI no longer do the job. What is needed, the author contends, is a new shareholder value approach.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Liam Fahey

Perhaps no other individual has written as extensively on value‐based planning as Alfred Rappaport. He is Leonard Spacek Professor of Accounting and Information Systems at…

Abstract

Perhaps no other individual has written as extensively on value‐based planning as Alfred Rappaport. He is Leonard Spacek Professor of Accounting and Information Systems at Northwestern University and Chairman of The Alcar Group, Inc., a Chicago‐based firm that provides management education, consulting, and software for shareholder value analysis. Rappapon first began to formulate his ideas on how companies should manage for shareholder value in the late 1970s. In his recent book, Creating Shareholder Value (New York: The Free Press, 1986), he strongly advocated making value‐based planning a more integral part of strategic management. And this was the issue on which Planning Review focused its line of questioning.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Alfred Rappaport

Strategy valuation is not merely a measurement technique that is applied after the strategy formulation process is completed. Its real power lies in the way it can be…

2106

Abstract

Strategy valuation is not merely a measurement technique that is applied after the strategy formulation process is completed. Its real power lies in the way it can be integrated throughout the strategy formulation effort.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

Alfred Rappaport

Executive compensation plans have come under increasing criticism. A new approach—value performance plans—offers a promising way to motivate executives to make decisions…

Abstract

Executive compensation plans have come under increasing criticism. A new approach—value performance plans—offers a promising way to motivate executives to make decisions consistent with the long‐term interests of their companies.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Michael L. Blyth, Elizabeth A. Friskey and Alfred Rappaport

Momentum is gaining among major corporations to use the shareholder value approach to planning. This approach enables management to test alternative strategies and select…

1445

Abstract

Momentum is gaining among major corporations to use the shareholder value approach to planning. This approach enables management to test alternative strategies and select that combination of strategies that creates the most value for shareholders. The authors describe how microcomputer software designed by a company called Alcar can be used by managers to incorporate the shareholder value approach in their strategic planning process.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

W. Bruce Johnson, Ashok Natarajan and Alfred Rappaport

Superior firms are those which create shareholder wealth. The most direct way to measure shareholder wealth is by examining the worth of dividends plus share‐price…

Abstract

Superior firms are those which create shareholder wealth. The most direct way to measure shareholder wealth is by examining the worth of dividends plus share‐price appreciation. The authors contend that the companies chosen as excellent by Peters and Waterman, in their book, In Search of Excellence, fail to show superior shareholder wealth creation.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2006

Peter Johnson

Abstract

Details

Astute Competition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08045-321-7

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Bernard C. Reimann

Victories in product market competitions are not automatically translated into stock market value. And conventional accounting methods alone don't necessarily reveal true

297

Abstract

Victories in product market competitions are not automatically translated into stock market value. And conventional accounting methods alone don't necessarily reveal true value. If managers want to link product market success with stock prices, they must also look at economic factors such as cash flow and cost of capital.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Bradley T. Gale and Donald J. Swire

An ancient management axiom holds that, “If it ain't measured, it ain't managed.” A more topical management axiom says, “The mission of business is to manage for increased…

Abstract

An ancient management axiom holds that, “If it ain't measured, it ain't managed.” A more topical management axiom says, “The mission of business is to manage for increased shareholder value.” Putting ancient and topical together, we deduce that, “Unless wealth is measured, business is not performing its mission.” Many managers believe this. Therefore one might expect the measurement of wealth to be a routine exercise in business accounting. It is not.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

1 – 10 of 44