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Article
Publication date: 22 January 2021

Alfred Presbitero

This study contributes to the literature by explicating why individuals become effective in performing tasks in intercultural context. Drawing from the social axioms…

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to the literature by explicating why individuals become effective in performing tasks in intercultural context. Drawing from the social axioms theory and intelligence theory, this study specifically investigates and generates new insights about the role of social complexity belief and cultural intelligence (CQ) in enhancing intercultural task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Two sets of studies were conducted. Study 1 was conducted in Australia (n = 222) wherein survey data were collected from employees (i.e. self-reports). In a subsequent study which was conducted in the Philippines (Study 2; n = 211), archival data were obtained from the annual performance reviews of the employees (provided by immediate supervisors) in addition to the employees' self-reports.

Findings

Results are validated in both studies that social complexity belief relates positively and significantly to intercultural task performance. Moreover, results show that social complexity belief influences overall CQ (and its cognitive and metacognitive dimensions) and in the process impacts intercultural task performance.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights related to intercultural task performance effectiveness. In particular, this study highlights the role of social complexity belief system. Furthermore, this study extends the nomological network of CQ by explicating how an individual's belief can relate to his/her level of CQ which then influences intercultural task performance. Aside from generating knowledge, this study also offers practical insights for human resources practitioners and for employees who are finding new ways to improve and enhance intercultural task performance.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2020

Alfred Presbitero

Social well-being is the perception and feeling of belongingness and integration within the community and the broader society. For self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) who…

Abstract

Purpose

Social well-being is the perception and feeling of belongingness and integration within the community and the broader society. For self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) who rely on their own personal resources and network, the achievement of high levels of social well-being can be challenging (compared to corporate-initiated expatriates who typically receive pre-departure training and relocation assistance from their employers). Hence, in this study, we examine personal factors and theoretically ground how they can be helpful and influence the achievement of high levels of social well-being among SIEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey study (n = 215) involving SIEs to determine how specific personal factors influence the achievement of social well-being.

Findings

The authors analyzed the data using PROCESS approach and results show that cultural intelligence positively and significantly relates to social well-being. In addition, cross-cultural adjustment is shown to exert an influence as a mediator and further found to be moderated by a personality trait (i.e. emotional stability). Supplementary analyses further show support for the critical role of each of the dimensions of cultural intelligence in the moderated-mediation process.

Originality/value

This study offers novel insights relevant for SIEs who move in to another country and try to socially integrate without any support from employers. The study highlights how personal resources and capabilities could help in the achievement of social well-being. Specifically, the findings suggest the important role of cultural intelligence which needs to be developed prior and after the relocation. Also, the study suggests how a personality trait such as emotional stability can be tapped to increase the likelihood of achieving social well-being among SIEs.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Alfred Presbitero

Drawing from theoretical perspectives on social identity, self-categorization, intelligence and leader–member exchange, the purpose of this paper is to develop and test a…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from theoretical perspectives on social identity, self-categorization, intelligence and leader–member exchange, the purpose of this paper is to develop and test a moderated-moderation model involving a member’s task performance in global virtual team.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study was conducted involving both team members and their respective team leaders in global virtual teams (GVTs) in a multinational firm based in the Philippines.

Findings

Results demonstrate that a member’s perceived cultural dissimilarity is significantly but negatively related to his or her task performance (as rated by the team leader). Also, results show that a team member’s cultural intelligence (CQ) (as rated by the team leader) exerts a moderating influence in the relationship between perceived cultural dissimilarity and task performance. Lastly, team leader’s CQ (as rated by the team member) exerts a moderating influence on the relationship between perceived cultural dissimilarity and team member’s CQ which consequently impacts a team member’s task performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature particularly adding to the growing body of literature that identifies factors contributing to the effectiveness of GVTs. Specifically, the authors highlight the critical role of CQ of both team member and team leader in reducing the negative influence of perceived cultural dissimilarity on individual task performance. This study also offers practical recommendations on how to effectively develop and enhance CQ in GVTs so that high levels of effectiveness particularly when delivering the tasks are ensured.

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2019

Alfred Presbitero and Mendiola Teng-Calleja

Drawing from Social Learning Theory and Multiple Loci of Intelligence Theory, the purpose of this paper is to assert that, through the mechanisms of social learning and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from Social Learning Theory and Multiple Loci of Intelligence Theory, the purpose of this paper is to assert that, through the mechanisms of social learning and role modeling, perceived ethical leadership is positively and significantly related to ethical behavior of individual members of global teams. Moreover, this study argues that perceived cultural intelligence (CQ) of leaders which consists of perceptions of members regarding leader’s cultural knowledge and skills on how to act ethically in different cultural contexts would moderate the relationship between ethical leadership and ethical behavior of individual members of global teams.

Design/methodology/approach

To test these assertions, a survey study was conducted involving individual members of global teams in Australia (n=234).

Findings

Results demonstrate that perceived ethical leadership is positively and significantly related to an individual’s ethical behavior. Furthermore, results show that perceived leader’s CQ serves as a moderator in strengthening the relationship between perceived ethical leadership and individual member’s display of ethical behavior.

Originality/value

This study fills the gaps in the literature by examining ethical behavior of individual members of culturally diverse teams and the role that leaders play in influencing their individual display of ethical behavior. Such knowledge can provide insights particularly for human resource practitioners on how to effectively generate and ensure the display of ethical behavior in contexts that are culturally diverse like in global teams.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Alfred Presbitero

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into religious expatriates’ cultural intelligence, adaptation and the role of motivation. Drawing mainly from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide new insights into religious expatriates’ cultural intelligence, adaptation and the role of motivation. Drawing mainly from the theory of intelligence (Sternberg, 1999) and theory of self-determination (Deci and Ryan, 2000), the study posits that cultural intelligence of a religious expatriate is positively and significantly related to his or her psychological and sociocultural adaptation. Moreover, the study hypothesizes that intrinsic motivation, as a type of motivation, plays a significant role in moderating the relationship between cultural intelligence and adaptation (both psychological and sociocultural).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 110 religious expatriates from various religious communities were surveyed. They were asked to rate their cultural intelligence, intrinsic motivation and adaptation (i.e. psychological and sociocultural).

Findings

The results demonstrate that cultural intelligence is positively and significantly related to both psychological and sociocultural adaptation. Furthermore, results show that intrinsic motivation, as a type of motivation, moderates the relationship between cultural intelligence and adaptation (both psychological and sociocultural).

Originality/value

The study contributes to the limited studies on non-corporate expatriation focusing mainly on religious expatriation. In addition, it adds value by generating new insights into the importance not only of cultural intelligence but also of intrinsic motivation in ensuring high levels of psychological and sociocultural adaptation. It further offers a number of practical insights that can be relevant for both corporate and non-corporate expatriates.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Alfred Presbitero, Banjo Roxas and Doren Chadee

How do knowledge-intensive technology-based offshore information technology service providers (ITSPs) in developing countries sustain their innovation and remain…

Abstract

Purpose

How do knowledge-intensive technology-based offshore information technology service providers (ITSPs) in developing countries sustain their innovation and remain competitive? The purpose of this paper is to answer this question by drawing from the knowledge-based view of firm innovation to argue that organisational collectivism (COLL) plays a crucial role in influencing the effects of knowledge-based capabilities on innovation of ITSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a model which shows that learning mediates the effects of knowledge sharing on innovation and that COLL moderates the effects of knowledge sharing on both innovation and learning. A moderated-mediation model is tested using structural equation modelling techniques and data (n=388) from a survey of ITSPs in the Philippines.

Findings

The results show that knowledge sharing capability is positively related to innovation and that organisational learning capability fully mediates the effects of knowledge sharing on innovation. Moreover, COLL is found to significantly and positively moderate the effects of knowledge sharing on both organisational learning and innovation. The results indicate that organisational learning serves as the mechanism that transforms knowledge into innovation, but this effect is contingent on COLL of ITSPs.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that ITSPs from developing countries can look beyond costly investments in research and development activities to invigorate their innovative capabilities. ITSPs can focus on the development of their intangible assets such as COLL to enhance the effects of knowledge-based resources on innovation for sustaining their competitiveness.

Originality/value

The moderated-mediation analytical approach to assessing the joint effects of knowledge sharing, organisational learning and collectivism on innovation is novel. The significant effects of the moderator suggest that the mediation mechanisms might differ depending on the levels of development of COLL in the organisation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Alfred Presbitero

Drawing on proactivity literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employee’s proactive career planning (taking initiative to prepare…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on proactivity literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between employee’s proactive career planning (taking initiative to prepare for one’s career) and proactive career enacting (taking initiative to act on career plans). This study also looks into the influence of proactive personality and cognitive complexity in the relationship between proactive career planning and proactive career enacting.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in Australia (study 1; n=271) and were tested using structural equation modeling. Another set of survey data were collected in a different cultural context in the Philippines (study 2; n=215) for cross-cultural validation.

Findings

Results show that proactive career planning and proactive career enacting are positively and significantly related in both cultural contexts. Results also show that proactive personality or the stable disposition of an individual to take initiative and be involved in future-oriented actions plays a significant role in moderating the relationship between proactive career planning and proactive career enacting. In addition, results show that cognitive complexity which pertains to an individual’s capacity to construe social behaviors in multidimensional ways moderates the relationship between proactive career planning and proactive career enacting.

Practical implications

In today’s turbulent environment, employees need to be proactive when developing their careers. This study highlights the importance of being proactive when managing one’s career. Employees’ proactive personality and cognitive complexity also help in strengthening the link between proactive career planning and proactive career enacting, hence, these individual-level characteristics need to be developed and enhanced in organizations.

Originality/value

This study is valuable as it extends and advances the understanding on how proactivity (proactive career planning, proactive career enacting, proactive personality) and cognitive complexity can contribute to career development of employees.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Akaraphun Ratasuk and Peerayuth Charoensukmongkol

This research investigates knowledge sharing and innovation on the part of culturally diverse teams in the restaurant business and their relation to cultural intelligence…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates knowledge sharing and innovation on the part of culturally diverse teams in the restaurant business and their relation to cultural intelligence (CQ), in which CQ was conceptualized as a team-level variable.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 103 cross-cultural teams in restaurants located in five popular tourist destinations in Thailand and were derived from multiple sources to prevent common method bias. The data that measured team CQ and knowledge sharing were collected from all members in each team and were averaged to create aggregate measures at the team level, while the team supervisor evaluated the teams' innovative performance. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used in the data analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that those teams that demonstrated high CQ tended to exhibit a greater degree of team knowledge sharing and receive higher evaluations of their innovative performance than did those that demonstrated low CQ. The results also showed that team knowledge sharing mediated the relation between team CQ and innovation.

Originality/value

CQ's contribution in cross-cultural teams measured at the team level contributes additional knowledge to prior CQ research that rarely has investigated the phenomenon at the aggregate level.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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