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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Alfred Loo and Charlie Choi

Introduces the special issue on the theme “Network/multiplayer games and security”. Outlines the topics covered by the papers within, with the objective of alerting…

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922

Abstract

Introduces the special issue on the theme “Network/multiplayer games and security”. Outlines the topics covered by the papers within, with the objective of alerting technical and systems librarians to issues which might concern them and provide them with a wider framework of experience from which they can learn and adapt to their own circumstances.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Alfred Loo and Y.K. Choi

Heretofore, it has been extremely expensive to install and use distributed databases. With the advent of Java, JDBC and other Internet technologies, it has become easy and…

Abstract

Heretofore, it has been extremely expensive to install and use distributed databases. With the advent of Java, JDBC and other Internet technologies, it has become easy and inexpensive to connect multiple databases and form distributed databases, even where the various host computers run on different platforms. These types of databases can be used in many peer‐to‐peer applications which are now receiving much attention from researchers. Although it is easy to form a distributed database via Internet/intranet, effective sharing of information continues to be problematic. We need to pay more attention to the enabling algorithms, as dedicated links between computers are usually not available in peer‐to‐peer systems. The lack of dedicated links can cause poor performance, especially if the databases are connected via Internet. Discusses the problems of distributed database operation with reference to an example. Presents two statistical selection algorithms which are designed to select the jth smallest key from a very large file distributed over many computers. The objective of these algorithms is to minimise the number of communication messages necessary to the selection operation. One algorithm is for the intranet with broadcast/multicast facilities while the other is for Internet without broadcast/multicast facilities.

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Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Alfred Loo and C.W. Chung

To report a new model for information literacy course development, one derived from a liberal arts university perspective; and to describe the experience of delivering the course.

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1541

Abstract

Purpose

To report a new model for information literacy course development, one derived from a liberal arts university perspective; and to describe the experience of delivering the course.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews recent studies in Information Literacy and incorporates these research findings into the model, which is then applied in practice.

Findings

That each university needs to align course development with its individual mission and unique environment – thus, to a greater or lesser extent, a specific model is required for course design in each context.

Research limitations/implications

There is an underlying research principle in this paper which implies that information literacy is not a generic subject and that particular aspects of the local context can be too easily ignored, for example, in the attempt to standardise and codify national (or even international) approaches to information literacy.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper offer new ways for delivering IL instruction in the classroom context, ways which have been tested in a real practice environment.

Originality/value

The paper describes a course originated by academic faculty into which library staff were then integrated; it also suggests a variety of original factors that need to be incorporated into information literacy course design.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Alfred Loo, Ming‐te Lu and Chris Bloor

The right of blind people to access the Internet is simply ignored in many countries because Web pages have been designed for normal people. As a result, many blind people…

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1536

Abstract

The right of blind people to access the Internet is simply ignored in many countries because Web pages have been designed for normal people. As a result, many blind people are not enjoying the benefits of the Internet and the improvement in the quality of life that Internet use can bring. In order for visually impaired persons to surf the Internet, it is necessary to develop a special human‐computer interface (HCI) system. This paper presents the design of a Web project for the blind. The aim of this research is to develop a new HCI model and an associated computer system for visually impaired people so that they can browse the World Wide Web via Internet. An assessment of the potential of a wide range of applications and their impact are also presented.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Alfred Loo and Charlie Choi

Playing games over the wireless Internet is significantly more dangerous than using traditional wired networks. Wireless networks offer new hackers new ways to attack…

Abstract

Playing games over the wireless Internet is significantly more dangerous than using traditional wired networks. Wireless networks offer new hackers new ways to attack. Since there is no physical connection for wireless networks, it is also more difficult to prevent attacks or locate the attackers. This paper will review the unique threats inherent in the wireless gaming environment and present a model aimed at solving these problems.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2011

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388

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Alfred Lo, Chris Bloor and Y.K. Choi

Presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. “Servlets” are used instead of CGI programs. Compares the multiple Web server…

Abstract

Presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. “Servlets” are used instead of CGI programs. Compares the multiple Web server model with a multiple‐client model. Experiments are conducted to test the performance of these two parallel systems. The performance of these two models is then compared. The advantages and limitations of these models are also discussed.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Ivo de Loo and Alan Lowe

The starting point for this paper is that the researcher is intimately bound up in all aspects of the research process. This idea of what is a critical aspect of much…

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1594

Abstract

Purpose

The starting point for this paper is that the researcher is intimately bound up in all aspects of the research process. This idea of what is a critical aspect of much interpretive methodology has been challenged by some proponents of the interpretive accounting research (IAR) project. The authors suggest that adopting some of the views expounded in the IAR project may lead to the accounting research community becoming isolated from other interpretive methodology inspired disciplines. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Currently popular views on IAR are informed by selective theoretical insights from interpretive sociology. The authors argue that these insights cannot provide a general frame with which to encapsulate accounting research that may be reasonably termed “interpretive.”

Findings

The authors’ reading of the literature suggests that the some of the IAR literature exhibits: a tendency to routinely make overly specific claims for what it is possible for interpretive research to achieve; the promotion of a somewhat reductionist view of what the bounds of interpretive research are. The authors suggest that these tendencies detract from the strengths of (adopting a broad view of) IAR.

Research limitations/implications

In expressing the authors’ concerns, the authors do not wish to make an exclusive argument for what IAR is and is not. This would not be in line with writing an interpretive paper. While the authors do not eschew the possibility of a limited building of knowledge by applying interpretive methodological stances neither do the authors see such activity as a central plank of interpretive research.

Practical implications

The authors believe that positivistic commentaries on qualitative enquiry should not be taken as exemplary of interpretive research (in accounting – or elsewhere). The authors feel that IAR needs to be more open to an array of subjectivist motivations, if it is to provide useful critique of the nature of day-to-day accounting practice.

Originality/value

The authors seek to go beyond the rather unhelpful debate about whether IAR should be seen to possess both objective and subjective elements. The authors argue that IAR suffers more from a lack of engagement and debate than it faces dangers from areas of interpretive methodology that adopt positions considered to be too subjectivist.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Mary Alfred, Misha Chakraborty, Michelle Johnson and Catherine A. Cherrstrom

The primary purpose of this study was to predict transfer of learning to workplace among adult learners enrolled in a continuing professional education (CPE) training…

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2869

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this study was to predict transfer of learning to workplace among adult learners enrolled in a continuing professional education (CPE) training program, specifically training courses offered through face-to-face, blended and online instruction formats. The study examined the predictive capacity of trainee characteristics, training design and work environment on transfer of learning among the study respondents.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey design was used to collect data from the study respondents, three months after CPE training. Two hundred ninety-seven trainees participated in this study. Data from 46 participants were incomplete and therefore excluded in the preliminary analysis, resulting in 251 valid responses and participants for the data analysis, 43 males (17.1 per cent), 201 females (80.1 per cent) and 7 (2.8 per cent) who did not indicate their gender. To answer the study’s research questions, factor analysis and multiple hierarchical regressions were performed.

Findings

The results of the study revealed training efficiency and relevance were critical in the transfer of learning among the study participants. The findings of the study showed combined training efficiency and training relevance enabled training participants to acquire knowledge and skills for application in the workplace and had significantly positive influence in transfer of learning. The work environment, measured by work variability (or flexibility) and work complexity, and the trainee motivation to participate, measured by learning-conducive workplace features, had a positive influence in transfer of learning.

Research limitations/implications

Because the majority of participants were females (80.1 per cent), this could be one of the limitations to this study. Research has identified that, because of the broad expectations based on sex and different family and occupational roles, men and women differ in their social network communication, participation in CPE, personality traits, gender-related occupational preferences, learning preference and methods of handling workplace conflict. The second limitation is related to the study design. The researchers did not have a control group because of practicality issues. This being a cross-sectional online survey study, all extraneous variables were not controlled such as in the case of a true randomized control study. This study is relying on the information obtained from a self-report training transfer instrument completed by the study participants. The accuracy of the obtained data is dependent on the honesty of the participants and their commitment in providing correct responses.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence pertaining to the transfer of learning among adult learners engaged in a continuing professional development training program. The study examines factors related to training design, training delivery, trainee motivation and the workplace environment and how these factors determine transfer of learning among trainee respondents who participated in the study. The findings of the study have practical implications for the design and successful delivery of continuing professional training among adult learners. The study could be replicated at a national level and in international settings.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Gerald L. Nordquist and Ross B. Emmett

Iowa City is located on banks of the Iowa River in a gently rolling region in the eastern half of Iowa, about 250 miles west of Chicago. It was the state capital until…

Abstract

Iowa City is located on banks of the Iowa River in a gently rolling region in the eastern half of Iowa, about 250 miles west of Chicago. It was the state capital until 1858, when the government was moved to a more central location in Des Moines. In 1919, the year the Frank H. Knight family moved to Iowa City, it was a small university community of about 15,000. No doubt Knight and his wife Minerva found it a pleasant enough place to live and raise their young family. To Frank, the town and surrounding area must have seemed much like that of Bloomington, IL, near where he was born and raised. For the first few years in Iowa City the Knight family lived in an 1890s vintage house close to the campus, and just around the corner from a public elementary school.3

Details

Frank H. Knight in Iowa City, 1919–1928
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-009-4

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