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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Aleya A. Said

The purpose of this paper is to describe a comparative study of two novels dealing with the life, feats and death of Alexander the Great: the winner of the 2007 Arabic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a comparative study of two novels dealing with the life, feats and death of Alexander the Great: the winner of the 2007 Arabic Booker Prize Wahat Al‐Ghoroub (Sunset Oasis) (2007) by Egyptian writer Bahaa Taher and Alexander: The Sands of Ammon (1998), Part II of a trilogy by Italian historian, journalist, novelist and archaeologist Valerio Massimo Manfredi. The paper highlights the similarities and differences between both fictional works as it addresses the different narrative styles, character portrayals and thematic concerns presented in both works.

Design/methodology/approach

An analytical reading of the narrative techniques and literary elements of the two novels.

Findings

The paper finds that the two works share similarities as far as historical facts, major thematic concerns and character portrayals are concerned.

Originality/value

This is the first comparative study and thorough analysis dealing with the two literary works.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

James Pounder and Matthew Clarke

Abstract

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Aleya James

This paper explores the work of the educational theorist Gert Biesta in a setting outside of the context where it was originally developed. It aims to address how Biesta’s…

Abstract

This paper explores the work of the educational theorist Gert Biesta in a setting outside of the context where it was originally developed. It aims to address how Biesta’s approach can help educators and policy makers question the philosophical underpinnings of education in the UAE and thereby start a conversation that is currently absent in this context. The paper comprises three elements: first, an overview of Biesta’s educational theory is given with a focus on ‘subjectification’ and his self-titled “pedagogy of interruption”. Secondly and in brief, I use Biesta’s framework of educational dimensions to analyse the philosophy underlying education in the United Arab Emirates using published government documents and media sources. Thirdly, I report a small-scale qualitative analysis of a specific educational space, three General Studies Courses in a UAE tertiary institution, to investigate the ‘risky’ possibilities involved in implementing a pedagogy of interruption. I find that despite a dominant policy discourse that discounts subjectification, there are significant opportunities for students to develop a strong sense of self. These opportunities are created by a small but strongly motivated group of teachers and taken up, on the whole enthusiastically, by students. However, my assertions are limited by a number of challenges which warrant further research. This paper hopes to provide a meaningful contribution to the limited discussion regarding the aims and expectations of education in the Middle East, and finds a pertinent philosophical grounding for liberal studies teaching in a tertiary context. As such the paper will be of value both to policy and decision makers in the Middle East and to teachers and trainers who teach in multi-cultural and international contexts.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Aleya Abdel-Hadi, Eman El-Nachar and Heba Safieldin

Recent studies in the realm of housing design avow for the concept of Liveable Cities; an aspect which in turn, places emphasis on the concept of home range. The home…

Abstract

Recent studies in the realm of housing design avow for the concept of Liveable Cities; an aspect which in turn, places emphasis on the concept of home range. The home range is regarded as the challenge to create a ‘near environment’ that is humanistic and fair, community-oriented and environmentally conscious; a relatively new conception towards responsive and sustainable environments for residents' well-being. Considering that socio-cultural needs in tandem with architectural and urban characteristics correspond to residents perspectives of their home environment; hence, understanding residents' perceptions of their home range should provide designers with deeper insights for creating more responsive residential environments. This study aimed at identifying aspects that contribute to shaping the residents' perception of their home range. The field study included two housing features within the same social class in Egypt with a focus on Cairo: residents of the city's original districts and immigrants of the city to newly suburban gated communities. The methodology was an in-depth qualitative study, exploratory in nature, based on a theoretical content analysis of literature on home range, and a field survey that investigated the residents' perception of the concept. Tools for data gathering relied on photographic and observation methods; together with a structured interview on a random sample in each of the two defined residential environments. Discussions relate findings to planning concepts, and finally, results have generated a framework for decision makers and designers.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Aleya James and Nicole M. Shammas

This paper aims to explore the link between the theoretical foundations of intercultural intelligence and a practical application examining a course dedicated to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the link between the theoretical foundations of intercultural intelligence and a practical application examining a course dedicated to developing Emirati students' intercultural intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the socio-cultural conditions of the United Arab Emirates as a backdrop to the investigation; establishing the pressing need for intercultural intelligence. The paper provides a theoretical framework to situate the course based on King and Baxter Magolda's trajectory of intercultural maturity (2005) and Davies' theory of “interruptive pedagogy” (2006). Guiding principles for the teaching of intercultural intelligence are given.

Findings

Informal feedback through post-course interviews demonstrates a positive self-perceived change in intercultural understanding having taken the course.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concedes that due to socio-cultural constraints the authors are unable to deliver a course with as much practical experience as the authors would like. As a result, students gain more cultural self-awareness and theoretical understandings of intercultural intelligence than practical engagement.

Originality/value

This paper provides a meaningful contribution to the limited body of knowledge on intercultural intelligence training at a tertiary level in the Arabian Gulf and breaks new ground in three ways: first by demonstrating the link between the UAE socio-cultural and political factors on intercultural intelligence training; second by providing a link between intercultural intelligence theory and practice and third by providing practical suggestions as guiding principles and creative ideas for classroom use. The paper will be of value to teachers and trainers teaching in multi-cultural, international contexts and to those providing organizational training in a variety of business contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Grace Inae Blum, Keith Reyes and Eric Hougan

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the experiences of teacher candidates and alumni of color within a multi-campus teacher preparation program at a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the experiences of teacher candidates and alumni of color within a multi-campus teacher preparation program at a large public institution in the northwest region of the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study used focus group methodology. Four semi-structured interviews of participants were conducted to investigate the opportunities, challenges, resources and supports experienced by participants in the teacher preparation program.

Findings

The findings indicate that while participants had varied individualized experiences within the teacher preparation program, many of them had common experiences that impacted their overall success within the program. These shared experiences include finding their voices silenced and seeking out experiences of authentic care.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of research focused on the recruitment and retainment of students of color within teacher education. The suggested implications offer important considerations for practitioners and policymakers regarding the recruitment and retention of students of color in teacher preparation programs.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Benjamin Jones and Daniel Campbell

Winner of the 2014 EFMD competition for best African Business case.In the 1990s, two entrepreneurs made daring, early entries into mobile telecommunications in Sub-Saharan…

Abstract

Winner of the 2014 EFMD competition for best African Business case.

In the 1990s, two entrepreneurs made daring, early entries into mobile telecommunications in Sub-Saharan Africa, both seeing great market opportunities there. One firm, Adesemi, would ultimately go bankrupt. The other firm, Celtel, would ultimately succeed and make its founder, Mo Ibrahim, a star of the global business community. Why the difference in outcome? Emerging markets often present weak rule of law, bringing many challenges to business success—from the demand for bribes to regulatory obstacles, hold-up problems, and even civil war. This case explores strategies that can limit these critical non-market risks in foreign direct investment and entrepreneurship. Students will step into the shoes of both companies by exploring their entry strategies, wrestling with the challenges they faced, and diagnosing the reasons why a shared insight about a new business opportunity turned out to be prescient—and led to extremely different endpoints.

  • Identify key challenges to successful entrepreneurship in emerging markets

  • Evaluate government officials or competitors that might trigger regulatory obstacles or hold-up problems

  • Evaluate potential allies that can help avoid these problems

  • Assess strategies to avoid paying bribes

  • Understand the importance of incentive alignment in directing investment success, even in the face of difficult challenges

  • Identify and appraise the strategic value of partnerships with development agencie

Identify key challenges to successful entrepreneurship in emerging markets

Evaluate government officials or competitors that might trigger regulatory obstacles or hold-up problems

Evaluate potential allies that can help avoid these problems

Assess strategies to avoid paying bribes

Understand the importance of incentive alignment in directing investment success, even in the face of difficult challenges

Identify and appraise the strategic value of partnerships with development agencie

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